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Accelerated BSN (15mo) or ASN-MSN Bridge Program (3 yrs), Which Would You Do?

Pre-Nursing   (155 Views | 7 Replies)

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So in the midst of applying to nursing school. I have a choice between doing an accerelated BSN which can be done in as little at 15mo or an ASN-MSN bridge program where I get an ASN after 2 years then complete my MSN online (total time to complete ~3 yrs). Which would you do? Are there any benefits to getting a BSN vs ASN? I will be getting a MSN after 3 years though with the ASN program. Please help!

Thanks!

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1,059 Posts; 11,093 Profile Views

Would the  MSN be a general MSN or a specific concentration that you are planning to get regardless? Also I would compare the cost of each program to help make the decision.

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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My first question is the same as the question posed by the previous poster.   What focus/specialty would the MSN be in?

What is the quality/reputation of each program?

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18 Posts; 85 Profile Views

 

5 hours ago, llg said:

My first question is the same as the question posed by the previous poster.   What focus/specialty would the MSN be in?

What is the quality/reputation of each program?

The BSN program is highly reputable. But I've also heard good things about the ASN-MSN program. I would have a choice in what I'd be concentrating in for the MSN, I'm thinking about nursing informatics or education. The ASN-MSN would be significantly cheaper too. 

 

Just wondering, would it be a drawback to get an ASN first? It wouldn't really matter right since I will eventually get the MSN a year later.

Thanks!

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

6 Followers; 13,271 Posts; 59,598 Profile Views

I would strongly consider the ASN-MSN program as it might be a "better value" for the investment.   That is assuming the following things:

1. that you'll be able to get a decent job in your community with the ASN.  In my community, ASN degrees are generally only offered by for-profit schools with not-so-good reputations.   Their graduates have poor job prospects.   However, if that is not true in your region -- and you will be able to get a good job with that ASN while you complete your MSN -- then it would be OK.

2.  An extension of #1.   The MSN is of good quality and well-respected.

If there is any question about the quality/reputation of the ASN-MSN school, I wouldn't do it.   I would not do it if the school is a "for-profit" school, for example.   I would not do it if the school is not fully accredited by the proper agencies (CCNE or ACEN for the nursing program) and the school as a whole should have regional accreditation.   In other words, the school should have the same accreditations as major universities in the same region.  If it doesn't have those accreditations, then I would not attend that school -- and would go to the well-respected BSN program.

Education is a big investment.  Make sure you are spending your resources on high quality education. 

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I'm piggy backing on this question because I have a similar one. Which is better:

BSN 2nd degree from Penn, or Masters of Science in Nursing (but not an "MSN" bc NY doesn't give MSNs) from Columbia? 

I'm hoping to work as an RN in NY after I complete one of those programs before going back to school for an advanced practice degree. Any advice appreciated.

 

 

 

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On 2/7/2020 at 9:08 AM, llg said:

I would strongly consider the ASN-MSN program as it might be a "better value" for the investment.   That is assuming the following things:

1. that you'll be able to get a decent job in your community with the ASN.  In my community, ASN degrees are generally only offered by for-profit schools with not-so-good reputations.   Their graduates have poor job prospects.   However, if that is not true in your region -- and you will be able to get a good job with that ASN while you complete your MSN -- then it would be OK.

2.  An extension of #1.   The MSN is of good quality and well-respected.

If there is any question about the quality/reputation of the ASN-MSN school, I wouldn't do it.   I would not do it if the school is a "for-profit" school, for example.   I would not do it if the school is not fully accredited by the proper agencies (CCNE or ACEN for the nursing program) and the school as a whole should have regional accreditation.   In other words, the school should have the same accreditations as major universities in the same region.  If it doesn't have those accreditations, then I would not attend that school -- and would go to the well-respected BSN program.

Education is a big investment.  Make sure you are spending your resources on high quality education. 

Thanks for your response. I think that most students do well with an ASN in my area, but then again, I am new to my state and have lived here less than a year. I researched the school and they both have proper accreditations.  

My other question is...after completing the AS portion, I would then enter the master's portion which is completely online. What is the reputation for online master's in the nursing community? Are they looked down upon? I feel like there are a ton of online master's programs...is this where nursing is headed?

I think I would do better in face to face class, but I've done online courses before...they are just very tedious and time consuming because I think the instructors want to make sure you're spending time "in class."

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

6 Followers; 13,271 Posts; 59,598 Profile Views

I agree with you about the proliferation of MSN programs.   It's become very common.    The quality of such programs vary from excellent to poor.   It all depends on the particular school.

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