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A simple list of what nurses do on a regular basis.

Posted

I've heard that nurses do some pretty grotesque work sometimes, which is completely understandable because of the nature of their work. I graduated from high school a few weeks ago, and I told my friend that I want to become an LPN, then a nurse anesthetist, and finally an anesthesiologist. But he warned me about how nasty their work can get sometimes.

I eventually read a series of sugar-coated, sunshine-and-rainbow articles about the duties of nurses and found nothing of what my friend mentioned. The articles made nursing seem like the most pleasant career on Earth. But luckily, I found this forum of nurses willing to give me information based on experience.

Don't get me wrong, I can handle nasty stuff. I just want to know how often I will experience it, and what exactly I'll be experiencing so that when I become an LPN I'll have a heads-up.

So if you will, please write a numbered list of your duties as a nurse. It doesn't matter what type of nurse you are, I just want to read stuff from people who have the job.

A numbered list ...of everything? Oh, please.

I could give you enough information to keep you reading for years just on my job alone. And that's not taking into account the incredible variety in nursing positions and the responsibilities that come with them.

How about you ask a concise question and I'll do my best to answer it.

Edited by SoldierNurse22

Wow! That's so many things! thanks for answering my question, you have been so much help, and I can't thank you enough. That numbered list you wrote was almost TOO long lol. once again, I can't thank you enough for taking the time to educate an inexperienced person.

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 15 years experience.

Wow! That's so many things! thanks for answering my question, you have been so much help, and I can't thank you enough. That numbered list you wrote was almost TOO long lol. once again, I can't thank you enough for taking the time to educate an inexperienced person.

I think you completely missed the point. There really is no list of what nurses do on a regular basis. It varies based on specialty, locations, type of facility, state scope of practice, facility policy, and that's just a few variables to start with.

If you want to see what a nurse in your area would do, look into shadowing for a day or two. While only a small glimpse into a tiny area of nursing, it would be much more understandable than a list that can't be created.

Also, you may want to research your career plan. An LPN cannot become a nurse anesthetist without first becoming an RN and getting critical care experience. A CRNA cannot become an anesthesiologist without going to medical school. Nurses and doctors are extremely different career fields. Yes, some nurses have gone on to medical school, but they have had to meet the requirements, including college courses that may not be part of nursing curriculum.

If you work at the bedside, you will see poop, pee, blood, or vomit pretty much on a daily basis. Depending what area you work in you may see more like large wounds/ wound vac dressings, open fractures, gi bleeds, chest tubes, etc. You WILL have to wipe butts. I work in ICU and we don't always have an aide but even if we have one, they are there to help you do it not do it for you. Obviously there are many more duties of a nurse that aren't "gross" but it is definitely part of the job. It's not that bad (most days) and you get used to it.

The above poster is right about CRNA vs anesthesiologist. You generally do not become a CRNA then an anesthesiologist, it is one or the other. If you became a CRNA, you would have to go back to school like 10 more years to be an anesthesiologist. If that is your goal you should just go that route. If you are wanting to be a CRNA, you should just try for a BSN, it will be quicker in the long run. Good luck!

Wow! That's so many things! thanks for answering my question, you have been so much help, and I can't thank you enough. That numbered list you wrote was almost TOO long lol. once again, I can't thank you enough for taking the time to educate an inexperienced person.

Oh, you're so welcome. I appreciate you, as an inexperienced person, asking for a list and then acting entitled to it once an experienced person told you your request was impractical. Displays great potential.

OP, in your infinite wisdom, you may want to consider that there is no nursing shortage, as you indicate in your profile. If you had average grades in high school, you'll need to work hard in college to maintain a competitive GPA. A job after college is no guarantee as many hospitals aren't hiring new grads. There are areas that have a higher demand for nurses, but many of them are rural.

Edited by SoldierNurse22

I have no idea how long it takes to become an LPN. But it sounds like you're gonna do pre reqs. LPN. The 2 years to be an RN. Then 1-3 years to go RN-BSN, 2+ years of critical care experience, 3 years of intense full time CRNA school and then 4 years of medical school (assuming you have all the medical school prerequisites) and then another 3-4 years of residency for your specialty. That's over 2 decades worth of education before landing in your final career (with no experience). I would suggest doing a little more research on what it is you want to be.