nursing students in Chicago want to go to Haiti

  1. 1 Does anyone know if nursing students can be of help in Haiti? Or do we need to be registered nurses first? Thanks!
  2. Visit  sallber profile page

    About sallber

    sallber has '3' year(s) of experience. From 'Chicago, IL US'; Joined Dec '05; Posts: 71; Likes: 212.

    14 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  AU-RN profile page
    0
    Yes, you HAVE to be a licensed RN. What good would the inexperienced and unrefined skills of a nursing student benefit the Dr's and other medical staff down there? There are seasoned Dr's and Rn's that are realizing that even they cant handle the situation down there. How would a student help any patients? It's admirable that you want to help but completely naive and unrealistic.
  4. Visit  tracy874 profile page
    0
    I am a RN as well and i would never discourage anyone from volunteering. I thought this post was completely rude. The situation in Haiti is yes overwhelming for everyone but more importantly it is critical that people help in anyway they can. Obviously they cant pass meds or help with certain procedures but there are things that these nursing students can do. They are not incompetent bc they are students! They could sit with children who have no other family left, help pass out supplies or assist other nurses who just need an extra set of hands! There are plenty of injured people down there who just wish they had someone. Go for it!!!!!!
  5. Visit  Emergency RN profile page
    1
    i read both previous responses; and well, yes and no. the main problem is, you need to go with more bang for the buck. suppose if one was given the choice of transporting 300 people to a disaster site; should one transport and house 300 trained medical professionals, or 300 good intentioned but untrained well wishing hand holders? that is unfortunately the cutthroat financial equation that these aid organizations have to operate under. if one ever looked up these actual medical missions and what they require, they're very specific. they want the sharpest scalpels in their kit, and not a band of innocents who could wind up being more of a liability than a help.

    that said, my suggestion is that even if you're not a licensed professional who work trauma and emergency care routinely; there are many other things that you can do locally to help with relief efforts. you can organize monetary donations, spread awareness of charitable organizations who are participating in the response, encourage colleagues who do have the highly sought after skill sets to volunteer, and most importantly, donate blood. in that manner, you can still give in a way that has positive impact, and you won't be in anyone else way or risk becoming a liability.

    this was really a very good question; i sincerely thank the op both for his or her generous intentions and for having asked it.

    btw, here is a sticky link from all nurses own site about where to donate: haitian disaster relief - links and number for donations
    Last edit by Emergency RN on Jan 23, '10
    AU-RN likes this.
  6. Visit  AU-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from tracy874
    I am a RN as well and i would never discourage anyone from volunteering. I thought this post was completely rude. The situation in Haiti is yes overwhelming for everyone but more importantly it is critical that people help in anyway they can. Obviously they cant pass meds or help with certain procedures but there are things that these nursing students can do. They are not incompetent bc they are students! They could sit with children who have no other family left, help pass out supplies or assist other nurses who just need an extra set of hands! There are plenty of injured people down there who just wish they had someone. Go for it!!!!!!
    Unrealistic......they need TRAINED professionals....it's not your local volunteering group...this is the real deal. They dont need people getting in the way that cant help in the critical time of life or death. Holding hands is NOT gonna cut it....sweet notion but completely ridiculous considering how horrible it is down there.
  7. Visit  Classof2010 profile page
    2
    The OP was simply asking if they could do something to help in Haiti. Your response was rude and not necessary. I'm sure they realized that they wouldn't be in the operating rooms, passing meds or working as an RN. How about thanking the poster for their wanting to help instead of berating them for asking a valid question?
    vball369 and Mexarican like this.
  8. Visit  SheDrum profile page
    1
    They dont need people getting in the way that cant help in the critical time of life or death. Holding hands is NOT gonna cut it....sweet notion but completely ridiculous considering how horrible it is down there.

    RUDE MUCH?? wow, you mean to tell me they don't need people who can bandage and clean wounds etc.??? What about last semester students? Even a brand new student can help transport and clean a person. That's a disgraceful comment you made. If someone is willing to go on their own dime and volunteer down there then who are you to discourage them? They don't have to act in an RN capacity to be helpful in a crisis situation.
    Kudos to the students for caring!
    Mexarican likes this.
  9. Visit  AU-RN profile page
    0
    Not being mean...just realistic....sorry but the truth hurts!
  10. Visit  RunninRN10 profile page
    1
    Wow- AU-RN...yeah i would say pretty cut throat for a poor student asking if they could be of any help. I love that you label them hand holders. She was not asking if she could go in there and suture up victims, start IVs and learn a bunch of new things. She was asking if there was ANY WAY SHE COULD HELP. I am under the impression by your comments you think the only valuable volunteers in Haiti are RNs and MDs?? By your comments yes. I would watch how you say things about volunteers in Haiti. Would you tell those who are trying to help neighbors and other Haitians out of the rubble they are just "In the way"? I dont think so. So instead of trying to EAT YOUR YOUNG like so many Nurses think is effective these days. Why would you not encourage the experience and the help in any way? This is a place for positive comments and encouragement as well as info, not a way to demean those who are our future of healthcare. Please think before you say things, because your words do have validity to some degree, but there are other ways of going about it. Act like an adult and have some respect. And just remember those "Hand-holders" are your future of healthcare and will be taking care of you one day.
    vball369 likes this.
  11. Visit  RunninRN10 profile page
    0
    au-rn
    once again i do not mean to question your 8 years of experience but, please do compare your wording to an rn who has had 25 years of expecience....there is a respectful way which includes rational....

    Quote from emergency rn
    i read both previous responses; and well, yes and no. the main problem is, you need to go with more bang for the buck. suppose if one was given the choice of transporting 300 people to a disaster site; should one transport and house 300 trained medical professionals, or 300 good intentioned but untrained well wishing hand holders? that is unfortunately the cutthroat financial equation that these aid organizations have to operate under. if one ever looked up these actual medical missions and what they require, they're very specific. they want the sharpest scalpels in their kit, and not a band of innocents who could wind up being more of a liability than a help.

    that said, my suggestion is that even if you're not a licensed professional who work trauma and emergency care routinely; there are many other things that you can do locally to help with relief efforts. you can organize monetary donations, spread awareness of charitable organizations who are participating in the response, encourage colleagues who do have the highly sought after skill sets to volunteer, and most importantly, donate blood. in that manner, you can still give in a way that has positive impact, and you won't be in anyone else way or risk becoming a liability.

    this was really a very good question; i sincerely thank the op both for his or her generous intentions and for having asked it.

    btw, here is a sticky link from all nurses own site about where to donate: haitian disaster relief - links and number for donations
    ....and then there are your harsh words.... please go ahead and read how she explains herself in a way she is not putting down the student, she is actually explaining why and and why not, and what else there is she can do if she would like to volunteer...other ways that could be more effective due to her lack of licensure. this is a seasoned nurse, who has respect for others and approaches the question from a standpoint where the individual is able to learn from what she has to say, not be put down and possible deter the student from wanting to help becuase she feels she may be of no help....8 years is a lot of experience, but please learn from how the emergency rn responded to the post. makes you think a bit, and yes nursing is cut throat, but there is a fine line between honesty and disrespect.
  12. Visit  AU-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from JB17
    AU-RN
    Once again I do not mean to question your 8 years of experience but, please do compare your wording to an RN who has had 25 years of expecience....there is a respectful way which includes rational....



    ....and then there are your harsh words.... please go ahead and read how she explains herself in a way she is not putting down the student, she is actually explaining WHY and and WHY NOT, and what else there is she can do if she would like to volunteer...other ways that could be more effective due to her lack of licensure. This is a Seasoned nurse, who has respect for others and approaches the question from a standpoint where the individual is able to learn from what she has to say, not be put down and possible deter the student from wanting to help becuase she feels she may be of no help....8 years is a lot of experience, but please learn from how the Emergency RN responded to the post. Makes you think a bit, and yes nursing is cut throat, but there is a fine line between honesty and disrespect.
    Since your info isnt made available...all I can say is that you are too sensitive. You cant be thin skinned in nursing....ever had to hold your own with a DR? Being blunt and telling the truth in a situation is more valuable than worrying about whether or not it might hurts someones fragile feelings. Medical professionals not mattter what kind that go to Haiti SHOULD be experienced and skilled...period. I do not live in a lala land....taking care of the sick and dying is a very serious skilled business....
  13. Visit  RunninRN10 profile page
    0
    And I do not believe I once indicated that those going to volunteer as Medical Professionals should not be experienced and trained. I strongly agree that they need to be our best. And yes I have had to stand my own with a few Doc's...not fun I agree, but you have to have a backbone as well as a heart in nursing. Sounds a little thin skinned yes....but in reality nursing is more than being rude and blunt....and not worrying about someone's fragile feelings... it is being honest- yet compassionate. So why dont you leave the chewing out of new nurses to the docs because news flash you are not a doctor and talking down to other nurses/ students does not make you a doctor either, so why you seem to be doing so is confusing me. Yes we do need competant, experienced, and dedicated nurses, BUT being disrespectful is a different story. I am not living in la la land either and apparently neither is this student. We are all shaken by this terrible disaster so why the negativity? So what a student wants to help....so be it. Let them do their part too in other ways. You are just so disrespectful to someone who wants to help? It would be very simple to reply in an honest way instead insulting the girl?
  14. Visit  zahryia profile page
    0
    Quote from AU-RN
    Since your info isnt made available...all I can say is that you are too sensitive. You cant be thin skinned in nursing....ever had to hold your own with a DR? Being blunt and telling the truth in a situation is more valuable than worrying about whether or not it might hurts someones fragile feelings. Medical professionals not mattter what kind that go to Haiti SHOULD be experienced and skilled...period. I do not live in a lala land....taking care of the sick and dying is a very serious skilled business....
    Youre wrong! There are approximately 8.5 million people in Haiti. Not all of them are trauma patients. There was a deficiency in healthcare before the quake and there is a deficiency for non-trauma patients after the quake. There's a long history of nursing students going to Haiti to help and learn new skills.

    I think last semester students would be a good fit for some of the hospitals depending on the location and the acuity. I know my country well enough to know what some of the challenges are. Please do not discourage anyone who wants to help.

    My only question is if you are in nursing school, how will you get the time off to go to Haiti. Don't jeopardize your studies unless you are doing a full semester practicum where part of the semester can be done in Haiti or another country.


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