Starting at a Community College.. | allnurses

Starting at a Community College..

  1. 0 Hey all,

    I am about to start my journey into nursing school, and I have a few questions about becoming a CRNA. I already have a Bachelor's Degree from a 4 year school (double majored in graphic design and marketing..) and I have found that after almost 5 years in the field, it's just not "doing it for me". I have done some shadowing and I am going to make the switch to earn my RN, but I would love to go further and become a CRNA. In my position, married with a 1 year old, an accelerated program does not really work for me, so I am going to go the slow route and earn my LPN to RN to BSN.. is this a ridiculous route to take? My grades the first time around really weren't exceptional (had the wrong priorities and graduated with a 2.9), so I want to start from scratch to give myself a better opportunity to get into an advanced program in the long run. It will probably take me about 10 years, but I will be able to continue working my marketing job while going to school (and being a mom). Once I have my RN, I will hopefully work as an RN while I'm earning my BSN. I am hoping that if I dangle the carrot of CRNA school in front of myself, I will remain motivated to earn as close to a 4.0 during school as possible.

    Now for the question (sorry for the long-winded set up), will the CRNA program look down upon the fact that my science pre-reqs were earned at a community college? I am in Minnesota and hopeful that I will be applying to the University of MN's CRNA program (in like, 2019.. yikes). Do I need to plan on taking more advanced science courses at a graduate level prior to applying? I am going to apply to St. Scholastica for my BSN, after getting the ADN from the community college in my city, then planning to get a couple years of ICU experience prior to applying for the CRNA program. A lot of hopefuls in this post, and I realize about 100 factors could change between now and then, but I am a planner and I need to keep the big picture in mind to stay focused.

    Thank you in advance for your responses.
    A
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. Visit  ckh23 profile page
    #1 0
    Quote from abjerk
    Hey all,

    I am about to start my journey into nursing school, and I have a few questions about becoming a CRNA. I already have a Bachelor's Degree from a 4 year school (double majored in graphic design and marketing..) and I have found that after almost 5 years in the field, it's just not "doing it for me". I have done some shadowing and I am going to make the switch to earn my RN, but I would love to go further and become a CRNA. In my position, married with a 1 year old, an accelerated program does not really work for me, so I am going to go the slow route and earn my LPN to RN to BSN.. is this a ridiculous route to take? My grades the first time around really weren't exceptional (had the wrong priorities and graduated with a 2.9), so I want to start from scratch to give myself a better opportunity to get into an advanced program in the long run. It will probably take me about 10 years, but I will be able to continue working my marketing job while going to school (and being a mom). Once I have my RN, I will hopefully work as an RN while I'm earning my BSN. I am hoping that if I dangle the carrot of CRNA school in front of myself, I will remain motivated to earn as close to a 4.0 during school as possible.

    Now for the question (sorry for the long-winded set up), will the CRNA program look down upon the fact that my science pre-reqs were earned at a community college? I am in Minnesota and hopeful that I will be applying to the University of MN's CRNA program (in like, 2019.. yikes). Do I need to plan on taking more advanced science courses at a graduate level prior to applying? I am going to apply to St. Scholastica for my BSN, after getting the ADN from the community college in my city, then planning to get a couple years of ICU experience prior to applying for the CRNA program. A lot of hopefuls in this post, and I realize about 100 factors could change between now and then, but I am a planner and I need to keep the big picture in mind to stay focused.

    Thank you in advance for your responses.
    A
    I don't know if a program will look down on your science classes, but every program is different and different things carry more weight in their decision. I wouldn't worry about graduate level courses unless your GPA comes out on the low side.

    I don't think there is anything wrong with your plan and it is the route that I took. I graduated with my ADN and worked in the ER for a few years and then moved over to the ICU. While working in the unit I got my BSN and I am currently in anesthesia school. My only advice would be to skip the LPN and just start on your RN.
  4. Visit  naptime14 profile page
    #2 2
    Quote from abjerk
    Hey all,

    I am about to start my journey into nursing school, and I have a few questions about becoming a CRNA. I already have a Bachelor's Degree from a 4 year school (double majored in graphic design and marketing..) and I have found that after almost 5 years in the field, it's just not "doing it for me". I have done some shadowing and I am going to make the switch to earn my RN, but I would love to go further and become a CRNA. In my position, married with a 1 year old, an accelerated program does not really work for me, so I am going to go the slow route and earn my LPN to RN to BSN.. is this a ridiculous route to take? My grades the first time around really weren't exceptional (had the wrong priorities and graduated with a 2.9), so I want to start from scratch to give myself a better opportunity to get into an advanced program in the long run. It will probably take me about 10 years, but I will be able to continue working my marketing job while going to school (and being a mom). Once I have my RN, I will hopefully work as an RN while I'm earning my BSN. I am hoping that if I dangle the carrot of CRNA school in front of myself, I will remain motivated to earn as close to a 4.0 during school as possible.

    Now for the question (sorry for the long-winded set up), will the CRNA program look down upon the fact that my science pre-reqs were earned at a community college? I am in Minnesota and hopeful that I will be applying to the University of MN's CRNA program (in like, 2019.. yikes). Do I need to plan on taking more advanced science courses at a graduate level prior to applying? I am going to apply to St. Scholastica for my BSN, after getting the ADN from the community college in my city, then planning to get a couple years of ICU experience prior to applying for the CRNA program. A lot of hopefuls in this post, and I realize about 100 factors could change between now and then, but I am a planner and I need to keep the big picture in mind to stay focused.

    Thank you in advance for your responses.
    A

    I 100% agree, skip the LPN part. You are going to pay an arm and a leg to get thru an LPN program....not worth it. Go straight to your ADN and work in the ICU while obtaining your BSN. You will be looking at a date much sooner than 2019!
  5. Visit  bsn2crna2828 profile page
    #3 3
    Hi there! I agree with the posts above. Don't bother getting the LPN. Go straight for your ADN. Also, an A is an A...whether it be from a 4 year university or a community college. It's all about the effort. At the end, they see the grades/GPA and NOT where it came from. You can achieve this goal a lot sooner than 10 years. But with a child and family, I could see why you would want to pace yourself. Be sure to get the highest grades you can in everything, but most importantly the sciences! Just so you know, I started as a high school drop out, got my 2 year degree, worked 2 jobs in different ICUs while obtaining my BSN (maintained a 4.0 gpa), and got into both anesthesia programs that I applied to. I also have 2 children (ages 10 and 1 month). Trust me, anything is possible!! It's all about how bad you want it!
  6. Visit  abjerk profile page
    #4 0
    You all just warmed my heart with your encouraging responses.. Thank you SO much! I don't know why I was expecting to get negative feedback! The community college in my town includes the LPN as a requirement to get the ADN, so I'm not able to get around it and go straight for the ADN, at least not with my local program. It looks like it will take me about 7 semesters to get my science pre req's, LPN, and ADN completed. Once I complete the LPN, it's only about 7 more classes to get the RN. I'm not sure how that differs from other programs, I haven't really shopped around.

    Any tips for balancing motherhood, working and going to school? Oh, and giving my husband some attention in there as well?
  7. Visit  ahSICURN profile page
    #5 1
    My husband and I were in school at the same time; me for my ADN-BSN and he for his degree. We also both worked part time and really didn't see each other a lot. What kept us sane was date nights. Each month we would sit down with our work schedules and pick one night (ideally) each week that we kept sacred, only for us. Sometimes we would go out to dinner, and other times we'd order take out and just watch a movie. It was great because we both had a few hours to catch each other up with our lives and it became something I really looked forward to! About half of my ADN class were working parents. I'd suggest something like what we did, so you, your husband and baby have some dedicated family time together. It really helped us grow together even more. We still do it now and look forward to keeping up the tradition when I become an SRNA
  8. Visit  RNtobe15 profile page
    #6 0
    For those of you in CRNA program or that have completed it, did you work as a nurse during the program? Why is the ICU ideal to work in before CRNA school? Also, I read that my program will cost around $48,000, did you guys save up or get loans? I'm just trying to find out as much information about CRNA school as possible.
  9. Visit  abjerk profile page
    #7 0
    On second thought, maybe I will take my science generals and then regroup in a year in a half or so to see if the LPN to RN to BSN would still be the best choice. I was also looking at an accelerated Bachelor's to BSN program that would be a lot faster. Just curious if CRNA school would then look at my marketing degree grades from 2008 or just the science grades and nursing grades? I just want a fresh start and I'm not sure what would be the best scenario for a hopeful CRNA.
  10. Visit  abjerk profile page
    #8 0
    Quote from dimov13
    For those of you in CRNA program or that have completed it, did you work as a nurse during the program? Why is the ICU ideal to work in before CRNA school? Also, I read that my program will cost around $48,000, did you guys save up or get loans? I'm just trying to find out as much information about CRNA school as possible.
    You might get more responses to your question if you started a new thread.. others may not see your question hidden in the responses! As far as I've read, sounds like it's best NOT to work during CRNA school as it is very rigorous and you want to retain every detail of what you are being taught. Also, from what I understand, ICU experience is required/ideal because of the vast experience you will get with many skills necessary to become a CRNA. I am just in the beginning of taking my science pre-reqs, so I am far from CRNA school and in the same boat trying to get info! Best of luck to you!
  11. Visit  RNtobe15 profile page
    #9 0
    Thank you, I will make a new thread but I will check this one if someone knows something, thanks!
  12. Visit  jflo956 profile page
    #10 0
    Currently in CRNA school here. I started off as a LVN->ADN->BSN. I found my ADN program to be more family friendly as it had day and evening classes. My LVN prog was pretty strict 8-4 m-f mostly. I did my bsn online while getting RN experience (Tele), applied to CRNA school after 1 year ICU. LVN, ADN, and many classes completed at community college.... so it is possible, good luck.
  13. Visit  naptime14 profile page
    #11 1
    Quote from dimov13
    For those of you in CRNA program or that have completed it, did you work as a nurse during the program? Why is the ICU ideal to work in before CRNA school? Also, I read that my program will cost around $48,000, did you guys save up or get loans? I'm just trying to find out as much information about CRNA school as possible.
    Out of my class of almost 30 students, I think I am the only one working occasionally (on holidays). There really is no possible way to work. You should expect to be in the operating room and studying anywhere from 75 to 90 hours per week. This leaves no time for a job. I've been in the CRNA program for almost 5 months now and I've only worked 4 times in 5 months. And I will tell you, the money isn't really worth the stress of going back to work and stressing yourself over having to be there. And all programs have a different cost, but $48,000 is probably about average. Most just take out federal graduate student loans or private loans to pay for tuition and cost of living (since you can't work).

    And to answer your question as to why the ICU is ideal to work before CRNA school.........You will care for very critical patients in the ICU. Patients that are on multiple vasoactive drips, patients with multiple co-morbidities and patients on different life support devices. Taking care of patients on ventilators is a very important part of anesthesia (managing airway). You learn how to be vigilent when watching their monitors and watching their hemodynamics and vitals change (and not just BP and HR.....CVP, PAP, PCWP, etc), treating abnormal labs and understanding why you are doing the things you are doing. You have to know what to do when things change (and change fast). You learn to be a little more calm and collected when crap hits the fan. Working in the ICU will give you the basic pathophysiology of the advanced physiology that you will learn in CRNA school. There are many other reasons why the ICU is required to get into CRNA school, but this post would go on for a while.
  14. Visit  RNtobe15 profile page
    #12 0
    Thank you for thoroughly answering my questions. I also wanted to ask about having a family and being in a CRNA program. Is it doable? I have 3 small kids and I'm about to start my BSN nursing program. Are there people in your class with similar situations? I'm worried that I would miss out on my kids childhood. I'm wondering if the NP program is a little less demanding and possibly better for someone in my position...

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