Reasons NOT to be CRNA - page 3

Hello everyone, I'm a student nurse in a BSN program in florida. I heard about CRNAs shortly after I decided to purse a nursing career. I thought I had my mind set on being a CRNA. However, so far... Read More

  1. by   micugirl
    Yes, the "getting in everyone's way"-part is so true,and I can't do anything right, except get the intubations. The girl I am with feels like she has it down pat to the point they are leaving her alone in the room her 2nd week, but she has had a lot of new grads as her CRNA's, and they are typically nicer about our situation. I hope you are right in that it gets easier. It's like--okay I want to learn about how to do all of these new things, but I don't want to get yelled at the whole time I'm trying to get it, so it's discouraging.
  2. by   deepz
    Quote from endorphinrush
    ........I have logged about 50 hours shadowing CRNA's. .......Most CRNA's I ever spoke with were not very happy in the job they held. ........

    Ouch!

    Really must say, endo, that's not been my experience these past 40+ years. Far from it. But ... most of my personal CRNA friends and acquaintances practice either independently or with much autonomy -- minimal or nominal input from MDAs, if any at all. Perhaps the specific jobs they hold are the rub for the dissatisfied CRNAs you've met? Do they feel micro-managed, brow-beaten, abused and dumbed-down by MDA employers perhaps? (... Not uncommon.)

    ?
  3. by   heartICU
    Quote from micugirl
    The girl I am with feels like she has it down pat to the point they are leaving her alone in the room her 2nd week, but she has had a lot of new grads as her CRNA's, and they are typically nicer about our situation.
    Don't believe everything you hear. A SRNA who is in her second week of clinicals is not being left alone. Everyone will say things like they intubated, put in lines, etc...most likely greatly exaggerated.
  4. by   yoga crna
    Anesthesia is not for everyone, that is the plain simple truth.

    When I was a program director, one of the hardest things I had to do was dismiss students from the program. The reasons usually were not academic, but were related to difficulty learning clinical skills, inability or understand the politics of the operating room or rigid thinking regarding anesthesia techniques.

    Now that the admission requirements are more rigid, students are comfortable with many of technical aspects of one to one patient care and with ventilators and tubes.

    As a CRNA, I have seen some mediocre colleagues (the ones you wouldn't request for family members) and I have seen some spectacular anesthetists. This is probably no different from any profession.

    As a legal consultant, I have seen some really bad practice, usually by CRNAs who have become complacent, have not kept up with current practices or have substance abuse issues.

    As you know, I love anesthesia, but it is not a profession for anyone who doesn't like it. You have to be comfortable in the anesthesia environment, like patient care a lot and be willing to participate in life-long learning.

    We are an elite profession with an excellent professional organization, AANA and have an amazing history. But, if you need a lot of direction, not comfortable making your own decisions or have difficulty dealing with stressful situations, you need to reconsider anesthesia.

    yoga crna
  5. by   goodytwoshoes
    yoga, deepz, and some of the other experienced CRNAS, perhaps I could bug you for some advice? I am a brand new SRNA- haven't even started clinicals yet- but starting to have doubts about my choice of professions. I was thrilled to be accepted into school- part of this elite group-but I'm not sure I fit the "type." I was in a highly acute trauma ICU for 2 years, with 2 years as a critical care step down nurse previous to that. However, I am not an "adrenalin seeker" as many anesthesia students seem to be. I am extremely thorough and cautious in both my professional and personal life, and I though I LOVE learning and challenging myself, (and most of my life people around me refer to me as "so smart!") I don't love a confrontation. I came to anesthesia because I was already tired of taking excellent care of extremely critical patients, having the resident on call asking me, "what should we do next?" and having the family come in and praise, "THANK YOU DOCTOR!" for a great save on a patient. I knew I could be the one calling the shots and I wanted to. But a pressure cooker? Not for me. I don't think yelling and screaming have any place in the hospital, unless it is from the patient. I have been in plenty of massive codes but I treat them like any other patient situation: ABCs, BLS, ACLS, 1-2-3 everyone has their job, and keep looking at your patient. No running, no yelling, no sweating, (except of course, the diaphoretic patient.)
    Should I get out now? Perhaps I am not "tough" enough? Its an awful lot of work to go through to realize I don't quite "fit in" in the OR.....????
  6. by   micugirl
    I agree that Anesthesia is not for everyone, and now that I have had some practitioners that are considerate of our learning curve compared to the other students who have a year preload classes, then I have had a better time in clinical. I mean, I don't have it all down pat, and some of the methods of practice that come with a "feeling" and experience are still hazy. I can say I would be doing a pt injustice if I let my CRNA leave me alone with him or her at this point. The girl I am with explains her ability to do so is: "Just pretend like you know what you are doing even if you don't, and they'll leave you alone." That's just it--I don't want to pretend--I want to pick their brains full of knowledge as much as I can while I have them available, and thus, they may be getting the impression that I do not know much, but I am merely comparing the conglomerate of information to try to form my own technique. After my 3rd week completed (of 7 total days), I know enough to get them on the table after preop, induction, monitors, and intubation vs LMA. The rest is coming slowly. I usually work very well under pressure, and remain calm--it is this underground world of the OR that is taking me a while to adjust to it.
  7. by   HyperTension
    Welcome to the joys of medicine. I leve a very good general ICU / Open Heart position to go to the University of Michigan to develop contacts for medical school (ADN, with almost completed biochem. degree). I worked in the Adult / Mott Childrens ED, and was able to spend about 1 week with the CRNA's there and absolutly felt that I had found a "home" if you will.

    Working on my lifesaving BSN (note critisism for getting my bach. in an anspect that I feel will have minimal impact on my future MSN (Anesthesia). Nobody asks you who your fav. nursing theorist is as you administer versed / fent / propofol / , ect, ect. And they can't once they are intubated )

    When asked from a husband / wife anesthesia team why I wanted to go into this field, my response was "through hundreds of years of knowlege from people smarter than me, I will have the ability to start, stop, slow down, or generally mess with any body process, and then place back to baseline". Their response was "You will do just fine".

    Anesthesia, like ER, ICU, OR nursing is about having a certain "mentality". Like anything, it will either fit, or not. For me, as this time, it seems to fit like a glove. Like anybody and everybody, you have to find that "spot". I wish you luck, this is a great forum, with some very smart people to utilize as a resource.
  8. by   Zinobile
    I understand and respect your concerns. You're the "cream of the crop" amongst your peers, then you enter anesthesia school where everyone around you is the "cream of their crop". It can be disheartening for overachievers and competitive souls like us.

    You started grad school, learned a new language, made (and will continue to make) lots of personal sacrifices, worked like a dog, and came up 'average' amongst your classmates, and it's only just the beginning. Work hard at engendering teamwork w/ your classmates and help everyone you can. That's what will set you apart from everyone else. Don't be so hard on yourself. Good luck!

    Z
  9. by   Sheri257
    Seems like this might be another reason:

    http://www.aana.com/uploadedFiles/Ad...hesia_cuts.pdf

    Assuming this info is accurate ... Medicare cuts would also probably mean less salaries overall. Seems like it would be even more difficult to recoup lost income and debt incurred for CRNA school.

    :typing
  10. by   deepz
    More up to date info:

    12 DEC

    "The bill adopted by Congress and sent to the President for his signature (HR 6111) reverses 5.1% of the 13.7% Medicare payment cuts facing nurse anesthesia and anesthesiologists."

    http://www.aana.com/Advocacy.aspx?uc...uID=6&id=6171&
  11. by   subee
    [QUOTE=goodytwoshoes;1916254]yoga, deepz, and some of the other experienced CRNAS, perhaps I could bug you for some advice? I am a brand new SRNA- haven't even started clinicals yet- but starting to have doubts about my choice of professions. I was thrilled to be accepted into school- part of this elite group-but I'm not sure I fit the "type." I was in a highly acute trauma ICU for 2 years, with 2 years as a critical care step down nurse previous to that. However, I am not an "adrenalin seeker" as many anesthesia students seem to be. I am extremely thorough and cautious in both my professional and personal life, and I though I LOVE learning and challenging myself, (and most of my life people around me refer to me as "so smart!") I don't love a confrontation. I came to anesthesia because I was already tired of taking excellent care of extremely critical patients, having the resident on call asking me, "what should we do next?" and having the family come in and praise, "THANK YOU DOCTOR!" for a great save on a patient. I knew I could be the one calling the shots and I wanted to. But a pressure cooker? Not for me. I don't think yelling and screaming have any place in the hospital, unless it is from the patient. I have been in plenty of massive codes but I treat them like any other patient situation: ABCs, BLS, ACLS, 1-2-3 everyone has their job, and keep looking at your patient. No running, no yelling, no sweating, (except of course, the diaphoretic patient.)
    Should I get out now? Perhaps I am not "tough" enough? Its an awful lot of work to go through to realize I don't quite "fit in" in the OR.....????[/QUOTE


    The anesthesiologist will still get the thank-you note - usually the CRNA gets only an honorable mention. As I get nearer to retirement I require less validation (getting cranky!) so just knowing that I did a good job is satisfaction enough - hopefully I will get to supervise lazy people in heaven for eternity. There's lots of choice for workplace environments when you get out. You don't have to work in the kind of place that you train. I already knew when I went to CRNA degree that slums and bums were great experiences as a student, but when I got out of school I was going back to hicks and sticks. Not to worry - you're plenty "tough" enough.
  12. by   chamorro
    It seems that the ambulatory care surgery centers (one day surgery) anesthetists seem to enjoy/love their job. Always smiling, always encouraging other nurses who are interested in nurse anesthesia pours out of these individuals. I work in 2 one day surgery centers and have been blessed to have unlimited amount of hours to shadow the crna's there. Grant it, I work with the surgeons of those centers closely and the management and I get along well. When I worked in the ICU or in the PACU/Preop areas in a hospital, the crna's there looked very stressed. Of course, politics played a huge role in the hospital vs private ambulatory care center areas, but it's something to consider. Before backing out of the idea of a crna because of your experience in the hospital or "bigger surgical centers", rest assured there are a variety of places to work. I am not a crna or srna, but I am on the road to hopefully getting accepted. Yes, I realize that a crna in the hospital vs a lower level trauma one day surgery center may make a crna more responsible for probably more continuing education,..etc. I have been interested in pursuing this career but honestly felt intimidated by the idea of the competition. But I have overcome that after being a nurse for 6 years (that and supporting my student husband and having 2 kids For those srna's that are unhappy or worried, as with any nursing specialty (icu,the floor, cvicu,oncology,...etc), the same seems to be for crna's depending on the hospital or private institution you work for. I really hope this helps some. Man, this is a great forum,...really helpful suggestions.
  13. by   Terpole
    Quote from deepz
    More up to date info:

    12 DEC

    "The bill adopted by Congress and sent to the President for his signature (HR 6111) reverses 5.1% of the 13.7% Medicare payment cuts facing nurse anesthesia and anesthesiologists."

    AANA - Advocacy
    Deepz, I have NO knowledge of the working of this bill and how it affects CRNAs but what does it mean to the CRNAs working in the field?

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