Intergrated versus Non-intergrated program

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    Hello everyone,
    I was just wanted to put this question out there among the SRNA's or anyone else with insight on the matter. What are the pros & cons to an intergrated program (clinicals and classroom work at the same time) versus a non-intergrated program(classrrom work the first year and then clinical the remaining time)? Any input would be much appreciated.
  2. 4 Comments so far...

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    Quote from marco346
    Hello everyone,
    I was just wanted to put this question out there among the SRNA's or anyone else with insight on the matter. What are the pros & cons to an intergrated program (clinicals and classroom work at the same time) versus a non-intergrated program(classrrom work the first year and then clinical the remaining time)? Any input would be much appreciated.
    Hey Marco!

    I have looked at this a lot. I think there is a huge variable to how the schools administer each type. So the definitions are not set in stone. I have read that some SRNAs really like front-loaded, as they feel that they are more well prepared for what they see in the OR-however they also feel that they have to wait SO LONG before beginning to learn the hands on stuff. Others like learning and doing at the same time in the integrated program, but also feel that their time is seriously crunched because they are working in OR hours along with all the didactics. I think it depends on the how the school does it. I think that integrated for me would be great, but it seems that many programs are front loaded. Where I interviewed it seemed like a nice mix-front loaded however you still had a few OR days a month and weekly sim-lab time. I think that's a nice mix.

    good luck and hope others will chime in!
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    Hi missnurse,

    thanks for the reply. good insight. I was just curious if there were any overt benefits one program over the other. it seems like the one w/ integrated would be very busy w/ school work and clinicals. but have the advantage over the non-intergrated in that he/she would be further advanced in her practice in terms of experience and clinicals. the non-intergrated program, on the other hand, you get the whole first year dedicated to just classwork. then the remainder you do all the clinicals and rotation. i was just curious wish would serve you better in the long run in terms of marketability and all. I'm leaning towards the non-integrated in that your life might be less hectic w/ separating classwork and clinicals in the beginning. but then again, i'd like to get as much exposure in the clinical setting to feel competent in the field. I"m not sure. in any case, i appreciate your input. hopefully, i'll get to hear back from more people.
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    My program in integrated but we start clinicals 3 months after we start the program. Clinicals and classroom days are on separate days. Also, we start off with just 1 day a week and after every quarter, we add an additional clinical day. Some of friends of mine are in a front-loaded program and they often voice when they started their clinicals, most of them had forgotten their lectures that corresponded to their clinicals. For example, OB anesthesia lectures were given early on in the program but they didn't start their OB clinicals til more than a year later, where most of the people kind of struggled.

    During clinicals, the front-loaded people well more versed in theory in regards to the integrated program students but when it came to clinicals, the integrated students performed well but towards the end of the both programs, the students ended up on the same level playing field. I rather do the integrated to I can perform what I am learning and it makes you feel more comfortable in the OR early on versus sitting in a classroom all day. The thing I like about my program is they have a 95% pass rate the last 5 years on their boards and they have a 3 month review course integrated in the curriculum and they also offer 2 exam review classes, one of which is sponsored by the University. We also have 2 fellowship programs for students to sub-specialize in either pediatric anesthesia or pediatric cardiothoracic anesthesia.

    Hope this information helps.
  6. 0
    Thank you SRNA4U, it was very insightful. i'm was curious as to the difference between the two. I was kind of leaning towards intergrated. but then again, if i cant get into that one, i will probably do the other kind. thanks again.


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