Do I really want to become a CRNA? - page 2

I'm a 26 year old male and taking all of the prerequisites for nursing school, and doing very well in the classes: AP, Microbiology and Chemistry - and they interest me more than most things have in... Read More

  1. by   hell000nurse
    ^^
    great reply! well put.
  2. by   SueBee RN-BSN
    Quote from Brad_RN_Student_PA
    I agree. Not a CRNA yet, but that summarizes the reasons that I am pursuing. Thanks for humbling some of us!
    Prestige is one the worst reasons to choose CRNA as a career. Look at what hubris has done to the medical profession, to the nursing profession as a whole, and to patient care. CRNA is not equal to big shot. My firends who are not in the medical profession don't even know what a CRNA is, and some nurses don't know what CRNA means.
  3. by   Dakkon76
    Jeremy,

    I was 26 when I decided that I was sick of being a computer programmer / systems administrator. I had set foot in a hospital all of about 4 times... and I dreaded seeing family members that were there because the hospital scared the hell out of me. I talked with a friend who was going into the RN program on his way to becoming a CRNA and after a few weeks of thinking about it I thought that was exactly what I wanted to do.

    I'm now on my last semester of my RN program, working on my BSN through another college and will graduate a year ahead of a normal BSN schedule. I'm not bragging, but I've done extremely well in the hospital just because of my work ethic and critical thinking skills. I've had lots of clinical supervisors seek out my instructors and say how awesome I was, and now just 4 days into my preceptorship there are about 4 people, including the supervisor, trying to pull strings to guarantee me a job on the unit!

    I absolutely LOVE everything about nursing so far. I was really worried about having to clean up crap, how I'd deal with emotional patients, etc... turns out I'm a huge patient advocate and I can't get enough patient interaction! All the while I've been set on CRNA, and I've talked with several CRNA's in the anesthesia group at the hospital and even shadowed them. I'd recommend typing in "anesthesia" in the yellow pages and seeing if anything pops up, if not... walk up to the OR room window and ask if there is a CRNA available. So far every single one of them I've met absolutely LOVES their job and after 4 years of busting my butt, being scared to death my first few clinical rotations... I'm still going hard and fast for CRNA!

    I look back now, 4 years later and think... wow, I'm 30 and a little behind the curve. Then I think... wow, what would I be doing now... at 30... if I hadn't made the decision to go back to school!? I haven't regretted it a single second, and doubt I ever will!
  4. by   I_am_Julia
    how is being attracted to the financial asepct any different than being attracted to the "prestige"?

    as long as one performs as they should in their position, it doesn't really matter why they chose the profession.

    Quote from utrn2005
    i'm not denying that the pay plays a factor. but the op didn't mention any benefit over the pay.

    personally, i like the autonomy, the higher level thinking, the prestige, and ,yes, the pay helps. but salary is not my only or even primary concern in my decision to return to school.
  5. by   LadyEJ BSN, RN
    Quote from justif99
    Jeremy,
    I've been a CRNA for a little over two years, and I can't imagine wanting to do anything else. I spent 4 years in my undergraduate work not knowing what I wanted to do with my life. I went into nursing because I worked in the OR as an orderly and enjoyed it very much. After working in an ICU for 2 years after nursing school, I decided to become a nurse practitioner and enrolled in school. My wife nannied for a family where the mom was a nurse practitioner and the dad was a CRNA. She told my wife that I should do anesthesia and forget about NP. Her advice as a NP was: it's very difficult to find a job, hours aren't great, and you do the work that the MD doesn't want.
    As a CRNA, you can find whatever kind of job you like, working easy or difficult surgeries, just doing OB, or doing a combo. You can work 40 hours a week or less, or more if you want. Right now, I'm taking overnight call and making much more money. You can definitely make $120K/year plus.
    Anesthesia is like learning a different language...it's very difficult in the beginning, but once you've learned it, it's very easy. I feel almost no stress 98% of the time. The other 2% is why CRNA's are paid well.
    Anesthesia is a wonderful career. I highly recommend it.
    I'd be happy to answer any other questions you have.
    Justin
    I really appreciate positive posts such as this. They remind me why I want to go into Anesthesia one day.
  6. by   deepz
    [QUOTE=I_am_Julia;2133655]......As long as one performs as they should in their position, it doesn't really matter why they chose the profession.[QUOTE]

    Not to quibble, but if one is to master any endeavor, and they attempt to do so by doing the right thing for the wrong reasons, they ultimately fail. So, yes, it does matter why we choose this profession.

    To truly succeed we must do the right thing for the right reasons.


    grasshopper d
  7. by   MediHawk
    Quote from SueBee RN-BSN
    Prestige is one the worst reasons to choose CRNA as a career. Look at what hubris has done to the medical profession, to the nursing profession as a whole, and to patient care. CRNA is not equal to big shot. My firends who are not in the medical profession don't even know what a CRNA is, and some nurses don't know what CRNA means.
    I feel that prestige plays an enormous role in the work that we do every day. There are many individuals that spent countless hours in school--i.e., physicians, nurse practioners, CRNAs, etc. and they deserve the respect they receive. These folks are not your run-of-the-mill LPNs or two-year RNs. People recognize this and the prestige is only one of the many rewards for being at the top of your profession. And, this is not a form of hubris since those who work hard at what they do are typically rewarded, and their patients are rewarded as well for being under the care of a committed, educated practitioner.

    As for your friends, although they may not understand the role of a CRNA, let alone know the meaning of the acronym, the majority of doctors and nurses do recognize and understand the CRNA profession, as well as demonstrate their respect for the type of work done by the CRNA. This type of understanding, as well as the fact that CRNAs are well paid, is what elevates the prestige of this fascinating field.
  8. by   kmg1019
    Jeremy,

    Many doors will open for you as a nurse. The possibilities are endless. Strong science skills are an important consideration but more importantly, you have to decide how much are you willing to sacrifice to practice as a nurse. If your "people skills" are not stronger than your science skills I would advise you against nursing. I have been an RN for 21 years and a CRNA for 10 of those. There are long work days, crazy scheduling, overwhelming number and acuity of patients and the dreaded "being on call". It is very hard on my family. When I walk thru the doors of the hospital I cannot leave until the OR schedule finishes. As a nurse, your shift may end at 7pm, but because of a sick patient or a couple of late admissions you have 2 additional hours of paperwork to complete before you can leave. There are not a lot of "atta boys". You have to be consoled by the little things that happen in your day. We are taught that anesthesia is 98% boredom and 2% stark raving terror. It's how you respond during that 2% that determines your success in this profession. We bear a heavy load of responsibility and are compensated accordingly but the reality of a lawsuit lingers in the back of your mind at all times. There are more days than I would like to admit, that I wish I sold t-shirts on a beach in the Bahamas.

    Kathleen
  9. by   Designer NP
    "....These folks are not your run-of-the-mill LPNs or two-year RNs." What exactly is that supposed to mean? I have worked my way from CNA,LPN, ADN-RN and now working on my BSN to CRNA. I feel I have a whole lot more experience just by "stair-stepping" my career. I find that comment offensive.
  10. by   CandyMSN
    Why feel guilty about returning to school for more money, prestige, autonomy? Who returns to school to make less? How many of us would be RN's simply for the love of the profession w/o any pay? If you are persuing CRNA congratulations. CRNA schools are limited are highly competitive (and expensive). Yes, you should consider pay grade before returning to school! You should always ask yourself, "Is this worth they money?" Be a smart buyer. Higher education is a purchase! Remain professional and diligent in your practice and success will prevail regardless of why you chose to return to school. On the contrary, more money does not equate to happiness.
  11. by   godsgem
    I did not even finish readiing because if you have to ask this question now then my answer is no.........
  12. by   yeSICU
    Quote from SueBee RN-BSN
    Prestige is one the worst reasons to choose CRNA as a career. Look at what hubris has done to the medical profession, to the nursing profession as a whole, and to patient care. CRNA is not equal to big shot. My firends who are not in the medical profession don't even know what a CRNA is, and some nurses don't know what CRNA means.
    It is funny that you mention that. My husband and I were just talking about how people are going to assume he is still the breadwinner when I am done with CRNA school for the very reasons you mentioned (I am a nurse/female and people don't know what a CRNA is for the most part... let alone know how to pronounce anesthetist). I do all the work, guy gets all the glory! Oh well, I guess he is helping put me through school over the next 28 months, so he should share in the spoils a bit when it is all said and done...lol. After all the loans are paid off that is...yikes!
  13. by   sunshine32
    I was reading your posting in regards to you being in NP school. Did you finish? I currently am in NP school and have had CRNA school in the back of my mind. I have less than 1 year of NP school left. I need guidance. Thank you for your time.

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