A day in the life of a SRNA A day in the life of a SRNA - pg.3 | allnurses

A day in the life of a SRNA - page 3

Hi All, I'm just another one of many contemplating applying to CRNA school. Something that would be extremely helpful to me would be for current SRNA's to give me a snapshot of what your... Read More

  1. Visit  tonyccrn profile page
    #26 0
    I think these posts are very helpful and such a reality check. I would also like to hear about study groups. I have heard some good and some bad things about them. what have others done and what have those who have done them, thought about them.


    tony
  2. Visit  FLAreN profile page
    #27 2
    The first semester, being that I didn't know how it was going to be like, I prepared myself to be dedicated to school until I could grasp the schedule and the material. It helped to learn how the tests were going to be like so that I knew how much studying I definitely needed.

    That being said, you have to know what your learning style is. I am a very indepedent study person; however, it is extremely important to study in a group because it will help reinforce material or clarify material. Additionally, there might be something that you missed in class that someone else wrote down and ofcourse, that will be on the test. I studied with a group twice a week and two weeks till test time, that woud be increased as much as possible.

    This was my schedule for the first semester. Then after that, I had to learn to balance school and family so I already knew how the professors taught and how they tested so I knew where I could possibly not invest so much studying time on and which I had to invest more time. The key is knowing how you study and knowing what your academic strengths and weaknesses were. For me, it was extremely important to get high 90s or hundreds in the beginning because I knew I was going to deliver near the end of the semester. Thank goodness for that because I would have failed had I not gotten high grades in the beginning to balance the fact that I may not do so well during finals because I would miss a couple weeks from delivering my second son.

    Moral of the story - those of you with families, always try to do your best because you never know what may come up that may force you to take time away from your studies. This way, you have a liitle room to not score so high due to personal circumstances.

    Ciao!
  3. Visit  armynse profile page
    #28 0
    Quote from FLAreN
    Thanks for the luck wishes...I DO NEED IT! I don't feel I am different than any nurse who has to do what they have to do...honestly, it is really hard for me and I know if I don't do this program when I have the opportunity, there might be other circumstances that may prevent me to do it. Thus, I do what I have to do.

    I am just happy to be able to share my story to all the moms who think they can't do it. I must say, I have the support of my family who help take care of my kids during the day when I am at school or clinical so that helps a great deal financially.

    I guess I have never been one to know how to accept accolades for anything because I don't feel I am very much different than anyone with a desire to succeed and a will to complete. My will has been tested and I have days when I ask myself what the heck I am doing but then I snap outta it. Some days it takes longer than others to snap outta it though so it helps to develop a great support system in and out of school.

    Again, thanks.... BTW, I am also a firm believer in prayer and GOD has definitely guided my brain to pass tests and get through clinical.
    Lesser women make excuses and give up easily. I earned both of my bachelor degrees as a single mother with two very young children. I couldn't have done that without support from my mom and dad...they were great. I also worked fulltime and graduated cum laude and magna cum laude, respectively.

    However, my undergrad programs weren't nearly as challenging as CRNA school. So, once again, I commend you.

    BTW, I have God on speed dial...I know that I will need Him when my program begins day after tomorrow.
  4. Visit  Summitk2 profile page
    #29 0
    Thank you SRNAs for your input... this helps a ton!

    Does anyone have any advice on choosing a front-loaded program vs. integrated, for those married and have (small) children?
  5. Visit  nurselizk profile page
    #30 0
    Quote from Summitk2
    Does anyone have any advice on choosing a front-loaded program vs. integrated, for those married and have (small) children?
    Yeah, in descending priority:
    1) They accept you
    2) Works for your family situation--the type program isn't the factor, it's the program duration, location and the vibes you get from the faculty and students
    3) Best type for YOU--for me, that's front-loaded, since I want to know as much as possible before I'm pushing drugs, intubating, etc.

    Apply to as many programs as you reasonably can consider attending.
  6. Visit  californianurse profile page
    #31 1
    Quote from nurselizk
    Yeah, in descending priority:
    1) They accept you
    2) Works for your family situation--the type program isn't the factor, it's the program duration, location and the vibes you get from the faculty and students
    3) Best type for YOU--for me, that's front-loaded, since I want to know as much as possible before I'm pushing drugs, intubating, etc.

    Apply to as many programs as you reasonably can consider attending.
    Nice! I'm with ya!
  7. Visit  AdonaiLoveable profile page
    #32 1
    I will not begin my program until August, but in my initial search for programs, I looked at clinical site location as a more important factor than front-loaded vs integrated. I focused on programs that had all their clinical sites at or near the school, or all within one metro area so that I wouldn't have to worry about being away from my small children overnight or weeks on end for clinical on the other side of the state from where my school is located (Examples of schools w/local clinicals: Mercer, UAB, Wake Forest, VCU). The program I'll actually be attending is didactic during the first semester and integrated after that, so its sort of a mix between the two (front-loaded & integrated).

    Adonai

    Quote from Summitk2
    Thank you SRNAs for your input... this helps a ton!

    Does anyone have any advice on choosing a front-loaded program vs. integrated, for those married and have (small) children?
  8. Visit  starae profile page
    #33 3
    There have been some questions about study groups and I thought I would throw in my two cents. Haven't been around lately because school is kicking my butt!

    Study groups can either be a big help or hold you back. I have a unique and solo way of learning, but have found groups to be essential for my success in this program. It took some trial and error in the first few weeks to get a group of people that work well together, but once that core group of people came together it has been a big help.

    We usually only get together before tests or quizzes because we definitely need focus and direction or we don't get much accomplished. It seems to work best for everyone if the people in the group have already studied the material on their own. I personally do not get much out of the group if I have not put solid effort into the material before going. Then we go over the material, trade memory techniques, clear up confusing material, and share that extra information that someone else heard while you were taking a mental snooze in class. Study groups seem to be great for reinforcing material or clearing up confusing concepts. They are not a good substitute for individual study. If I don't have time to study the stuff on my own before a group, then I stay home.

    This may seem elementary, but hope it helps.
  9. Visit  CRNA1982 profile page
    #34 1
    I agree with you.
  10. Visit  MB37 profile page
    #35 0
    I have definitely enjoyed all the responses to this thread so far, please keep them coming! I have a question as well - I know everyone says that CRNA programs do not compare to nursing school, or to any other college experience that anyone has had. How many of you were in an ABSN program? If you were, do you feel the same way? I don't find mine terribly difficult (and I only have 4 weeks left), just time consuming. I have straight As so far. If any of you felt the same, how are you taking to anesthesia? I fully expect it to be the most difficult thing I've ever done - but I expected that of nursing school and it really isn't. Would it be even remotely accurate to characterize your CRNA program as approximately as time consuming as your ABSN program was, with the difficulty level ramped up severely, or am I still way off? Thanks!
  11. Visit  lovegasRN profile page
    #36 0
    Quote from AdonaiLoveable
    I will not begin my program until August, but in my initial search for programs, I looked at clinical site location as a more important factor than front-loaded vs integrated. I focused on programs that had all their clinical sites at or near the school, or all within one metro area so that I wouldn't have to worry about being away from my small children overnight or weeks on end for clinical on the other side of the state from where my school is located (Examples of schools w/local clinicals: Mercer, UAB, Wake Forest, VCU). The program I'll actually be attending is didactic during the first semester and integrated after that, so its sort of a mix between the two (front-loaded & integrated).

    Adonai
    What program did you end up choosing to go to and why? Did any of them seem more family friendly than another? I too, want to attend somewhere with a close proximity of clinical sites. Thanks for the info.
  12. Visit  gasmaster profile page
    #37 2
    Quote from lovegasRN
    What program did you end up choosing to go to and why? Did any of them seem more family friendly than another? I too, want to attend somewhere with a close proximity of clinical sites. Thanks for the info.
    I interviewed at both Texas Wesleyan and TCU. I chose TCU because they seemed to be very supportive of family and the student. During the Wesleyan interview they have you watch a DVD. Most of us felt it was pretty doom-and-gloom. Ya know, how hard it is & how the first year reall weed people out, etc. TCU was the opposite. They said they don't want any to fail. They will do all they can to help the students, and they totally understand that family is a huge factor in all this. However, both schools were very upfront about the fact that you, the student, are basically going to be like another child in the household during school. Your spouse will be the primary caregiver and is often taking on the load of a single parent. Don't know if this helps or not. My hubbie and I had a long talk and planned it all out. He is going to assume responsibility for paying all the bills, laundry, cooking most meals, and helping our son with all his schoolwork.
  13. Visit  AdonaiLoveable profile page
    #38 2
    Quote from AdonaiLoveable
    I will not begin my program until August, but in my initial search for programs, I looked at clinical site location as a more important factor than front-loaded vs integrated. I focused on programs that had all their clinical sites at or near the school, or all within one metro area so that I wouldn't have to worry about being away from my small children overnight or weeks on end for clinical on the other side of the state from where my school is located (Examples of schools w/local clinicals: Mercer, UAB, Wake Forest, VCU). The program I'll actually be attending is didactic during the first semester and integrated after that, so its sort of a mix between the two (front-loaded & integrated).

    Adonai
    I chose Virginia Commonwealth University located in Richmond, VA. I applied to many programs, received interview invitations to all but one of them, but I only interviewed at the first two programs that I was invited two as they were already my top two choices. I was so highly impressed with both Wake Forest and VCU and was quickly informed that I'd been accepted to them both, that I just picked between the two of them and turned down the other interviews.

    I loved what I learned about both programs during the interview process, but I felt so positively about VCU after getting to meet and speak with so many of the faculty during the interview process that I decided it would be the best place for me. In the presentation given prior to the start of the interviews, both VCU and Wake Forest are honest and open with you about the rigor of the programs. It will not be a walk in the park! But both programs had successful students with families in them which gives me an indication that getting through and doing well can be done for students with families.

    I think if you prepare yourself and your family as best you can, it is doable. For example, in my situation, I have a toddler and an infant, my husband works from home (so his job + his benefits will move with us when I attend school), and my Mom is actually making the huge sacrifice of moving with us to Richmond to care for the children and help keep the house together while I'm in school. I'm already planning for things like meals by using one of those frozen dinner companies like Super Suppers, and the home we rented is close to the school, in a great location for getting to clinicals, only a miles or so to the interstate, and within a mile or so of all the shopping and banking resources we'll need.

    I am so happy with my choice. Both the program and the city seem pretty family friendly.

    Adonai

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