Which FNP programs are the shortest? - page 3

I have heard that Vanderbilt is one year? Georgetown is 16 months? Are there any other fast pace FNP programs out there that can be done in less than two years?... Read More

  1. by   nursegirl2001
    rynophiliac


    I have read through the entire thread and even if I knew of an accelerated program I would not encourage such anyway. Obviously others are every bit as concerned as I but I won't reply again to this topic.....
  2. by   SHGR
    Quote from rynophiliac
    Sapphire, are you saying that I can do clinicals in a rheumatology clinic and get credit for them in the program? That would be great. I have never heard this before.
    I think this is relatively common. For example, a colleague of mine just completed her FNP studies. She had a clinical in a women's health setting, a clinical in a family medicine setting, and one with a dermatologist. She wants to do women's health, but they got assigned. Some programs will let you choose a preceptor.
    Good luck in your search.
  3. by   rynophiliac
    Quote from hey_suz
    I think this is relatively common. For example, a colleague of mine just completed her FNP studies. She had a clinical in a women's health setting, a clinical in a family medicine setting, and one with a dermatologist. She wants to do women's health, but they got assigned. Some programs will let you choose a preceptor.
    Good luck in your search.
    That would be great I didn't realize that this was even a possibility. I planned on doing some training courses with the American College of Rheumatology for NPs and PAs after I completed the FNP but some clinicals in Rheumatology would be great too. I will add this to my list of questions to find out when I research different schools.

    Thanks
  4. by   Patti_RN
    Clinical requirements are dictated by individual programs, and sometimes at the whims of school directors or others. Some programs assign preceptors, others encourage or expect students to find their own. Some schools want each student to have different specialty experiences beyond their first and maybe second rotations. This is similar to most nursing school models where students gain general med-surg experience and general nursing education, then continue to 'specialties' where they get a taste of different areas of nursing where a greater depth and focus is required. These may be the programs to consider if you are sure you want to do something like dermatology or nephrology. On the other hand, if you're unsure if you want to 'specialize' or if you like the idea of family practice, you may want to consider programs that allow you to stick with the same preceptor from one semester to the next in family practice settings where you will see a range of ages, both genders, and a variety of medical conditions.

    The very first question a prospective student should ask an on-line or distance school is, "I am a resident of XYZ state; can will I be able to do my clinicals in my area?"
  5. by   nursegirl2001
    Patti RN:

    I could not have said it any better than that. I chose, well God chose the FNP area of study because of the focus of both medical and psychiatric issues which was what I wanted to do anyway. Family practice as you so well stated sees an array of health conditions and across the life span. I am happy with the choice to pursue FNP !!!!!!!!!!!!
  6. by   daniam25
    Id like to reply to this post. I disagree that a quicker education could be an issue. I have been an ER/trauma and flight RN for over 10 years, already have an MSN degree in nursing education and a doctoral degree in education (Ed.D), 3 ANCC board certifications, CPEN, CEN, and CFRN certifications. Not trying to sound bold, but I think that one year of an NP program would be perfectly sufficient for me to practice as an NP. So, I think that asking "what program is quickest" is appropriate considering a highly experienced registered nurse would succeed in their NP role, regardless of the length of the program. Plus you have to remember that most NP's were experienced nurses for years before they attended an NP program. I guess it just depends on the individual RN and their background. I am considering NP programs at this time and have found that most of the post-MSN NP programs can be completed in less than one year as I have already taken the majority of the same classes that NP's take. Oh, and I teach two courses in an NP program already (advanced pathophysiology and advanced pharmacology)...
  7. by   nomadcrna
    I totally agree with this post.

    Quote from daniam25
    Id like to reply to this post. I disagree that a quicker education could be an issue. I have been an ER/trauma and flight RN for over 10 years, already have an MSN degree in nursing education and a doctoral degree in education (Ed.D), 3 ANCC board certifications, CPEN, CEN, and CFRN certifications. Not trying to sound bold, but I think that one year of an NP program would be perfectly sufficient for me to practice as an NP. So, I think that asking "what program is quickest" is appropriate considering a highly experienced registered nurse would succeed in their NP role, regardless of the length of the program. Plus you have to remember that most NP's were experienced nurses for years before they attended an NP program. I guess it just depends on the individual RN and their background. I am considering NP programs at this time and have found that most of the post-MSN NP programs can be completed in less than one year as I have already taken the majority of the same classes that NP's take. Oh, and I teach two courses in an NP program already (advanced pathophysiology and advanced pharmacology)...
  8. by   RN4JUSTICE
    doesn't worry me. Some of us have other education and degrees and we just want to get the redundant paper work out of the way
  9. by   KaraBSNRNCRRN
    I was thinking the same thing, no one knows your intelligence or circumstance, just answer the question. Some of us, like me, have been a clinical nurse for 15 years... That must account for something. AND I received my BSN from some wonderful, very particular, nuns! With a family of 6 and working overtime, I want the fastest ACCREDITED MNP out there. And to exbound on what you eluded to, I just got report from a med surg float that doesn't even know how to start an IV really. WTH?
  10. by   RN4JUSTICE
    It should not worry you. I am in a situation where I have a bachelor of science and an NP certificate from Canada. I worked as an FNP for 2 years before immigrating here and working as RN. I got my NP CA license through reciprocity back in 99. I ended up in management and eventually completed an MBA in health care admin. Now I am thinking about either a DNP or maybe being an NP again. They have made it so difficult for those of us who have a diverse educational back ground to for example complete the new NP requirements that mean you have to have a masters. Going back to the original point :yes I personally would seek the shortest, fastest , cheapest way to get the masters and get it online too to minimize disruptions to my established career and family life.
  11. by   applesxoranges
    Most NP programs I have seen is 2 to 3 years and usually non-stop.
  12. by   Lala72
    What program did you end up doing?
  13. by   Dodongo
    Quote from KaraBSNRNCRRN
    I was thinking the same thing, no one knows your intelligence or circumstance, just answer the question. Some of us, like me, have been a clinical nurse for 15 years... That must account for something. AND I received my BSN from some wonderful, very particular, nuns! With a family of 6 and working overtime, I want the fastest ACCREDITED MNP out there. And to exbound on what you eluded to, I just got report from a med surg float that doesn't even know how to start an IV really. WTH?
    The point is not everyone has the same experience or abilities. NP education is extremely unstandardized. Some people are brand new nurses, fresh out of their BSN, and entering a program that is approximately 1 year that allows them to diagnose and treat/prescribe. I personally am not a huge fan of that. Minimum requirements and standardization protects the quality of the professionals graduating and ultimately the quality of care patients will be receiving. It's not a personal slight against anyone.

    Perfect example - starting an IV is a skill that can be easily acquired. Who cares if the nurse can or can't start an IV? Show me a physician (other than an anesthesiologist) who can start an IV? You can teach a tech to start an IV. Knowledge and its application is another story entirely.

    Prior experience as a nurse is a must in my opinion. But at some point you reach a plateau. A RN is not a NP. And while I think you can learn a lot as a RN, it does not replace the need for time and experience in a NP program within a controlled environment where you are being watched and trained.

close