Which FNP programs are the shortest? - page 3

I have heard that Vanderbilt is one year? Georgetown is 16 months? Are there any other fast pace FNP programs out there that can be done in less than two years?... Read More

  1. 0
    Well that's up to your program...I would assume that clinicals for FNP would primarily be in primary care practices. But I have not researched this since I am looking into ACNP so you should speak to a recruiter or advisor from the program directly.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 0
    University of Pennsylvania's FNP program starts in September and runs through the following December, so that's 15 months. However, they are filled up through at least 2014 the last I heard. You would have to inquire to find out. Here's some info:

    Penn Nursing Science

    Feel free to email any of the profs listed. I found everyone at Penn very responsive when I was thinking about applying there. (Full disclosure: I am finishing my Penn degree in about 7 weeks, but I chose a different track than FNP.) You can also PM me for more info. I've taken courses with FNP students and had some of their teachers as profs.
  3. 0
    There's one in Michigan.University of michgan @ flint I think. Accepts only 12 students a year. Has a grant to pay for students education for the next 3-4 years I think... Fast program.. I couldn't do it cause I have to work. Good luck!
  4. 3
    Georgetown's full-time program is 18 months and beyond rigorous! They also have a part time option that takes two years. Unless you're Einstein, it's probably impossible to work at all while enrolled full time. The university estimates most students devote 75 hours per week on classes, studying, and clinicals. If you work one day per week you'll have to spend more than 12 hours per day the other six days. You might manage this pace for a month or two, but you probably won't be able to maintain it for a year and a half. Is there a pressing reason you want to complete an NP in less than two years? I was given advice once, "Everyone wants to apply today, be accepted tomorrow, begin the day after, then finish in as little time possible. You can either rush to failure or take a reasonable amount of time to success."
    Mom To 4, nursegirl2001, and sapphire18 like this.
  5. 1
    rynophiliac

    I too am in a position where I do not have to work, however .... I am not in the mindset to rush through such a serious aspect of clinical healthcare performance and services. Think about it for a minute, doctors have to go to school for a lot longer than NPs so how can we even offer accelerated programs under 2 years that actually prove effective in the clinical setting?? ... .As other posters have commented I would not want a practitioner who has rushed through a program and is treating me because I cannot help but wonder and associate this behavior/attitude with potential for the same disposition in the professional setting. NP is a serious job and responsibility that requires rigorous study:icon_roll..........hurried education will most likely equal hurried (potentially detrimental and incompetent) results.....
    I want to get through school as well but I want to be competent and knowledgeable as a provider but I need adequate TIME to learn the material to be able to do so effectively..... ...
    Mom To 4 likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from nursegirl2001
    rynophiliac

    I too am in a position where I do not have to work, however .... I am not in the mindset to rush through such a serious aspect of clinical healthcare performance and services. Think about it for a minute, doctors have to go to school for a lot longer than NPs so how can we even offer accelerated programs under 2 years that actually prove effective in the clinical setting?? ... .As other posters have commented I would not want a practitioner who has rushed through a program and is treating me because I cannot help but wonder and associate this behavior/attitude with potential for the same disposition in the professional setting. NP is a serious job and responsibility that requires rigorous study:icon_roll..........hurried education will most likely equal hurried (potentially detrimental and incompetent) results.....
    I want to get through school as well but I want to be competent and knowledgeable as a provider but I need adequate TIME to learn the material to be able to do so effectively..... ...
    Nursegirl, I'm not sure if you read through the entire thread or not but we have already covered this. This thread is not about how about how effective accelerated FNP programs are in preparing their graduates for clinical practice, it is to identify which accelerated programs are out there so potential students can do further research into each program.
  7. 0
    rynophiliac


    I have read through the entire thread and even if I knew of an accelerated program I would not encourage such anyway. Obviously others are every bit as concerned as I but I won't reply again to this topic.....
  8. 0
    Quote from rynophiliac
    Sapphire, are you saying that I can do clinicals in a rheumatology clinic and get credit for them in the program? That would be great. I have never heard this before.
    I think this is relatively common. For example, a colleague of mine just completed her FNP studies. She had a clinical in a women's health setting, a clinical in a family medicine setting, and one with a dermatologist. She wants to do women's health, but they got assigned. Some programs will let you choose a preceptor.
    Good luck in your search.
  9. 1
    Quote from hey_suz
    I think this is relatively common. For example, a colleague of mine just completed her FNP studies. She had a clinical in a women's health setting, a clinical in a family medicine setting, and one with a dermatologist. She wants to do women's health, but they got assigned. Some programs will let you choose a preceptor.
    Good luck in your search.
    That would be great I didn't realize that this was even a possibility. I planned on doing some training courses with the American College of Rheumatology for NPs and PAs after I completed the FNP but some clinicals in Rheumatology would be great too. I will add this to my list of questions to find out when I research different schools.

    Thanks
    SHGR likes this.
  10. 1
    Clinical requirements are dictated by individual programs, and sometimes at the whims of school directors or others. Some programs assign preceptors, others encourage or expect students to find their own. Some schools want each student to have different specialty experiences beyond their first and maybe second rotations. This is similar to most nursing school models where students gain general med-surg experience and general nursing education, then continue to 'specialties' where they get a taste of different areas of nursing where a greater depth and focus is required. These may be the programs to consider if you are sure you want to do something like dermatology or nephrology. On the other hand, if you're unsure if you want to 'specialize' or if you like the idea of family practice, you may want to consider programs that allow you to stick with the same preceptor from one semester to the next in family practice settings where you will see a range of ages, both genders, and a variety of medical conditions.

    The very first question a prospective student should ask an on-line or distance school is, "I am a resident of XYZ state; can will I be able to do my clinicals in my area?"
    nursegirl2001 likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top