What if you have a bachelor's degree in another discipline and are getting a ADN? - page 3

by AZO49008

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I'm a mid-life career changer and have a bachelor's degree in marketing. I spent 13 years in that profession and the last two positions were in management. I'll soon be entering an ADN program. My undergraduate alma mater... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Michigangirl
    Respectfully, I really don't think an ADN is a dumbed-down version for people that aren't capable of university-level classes. At least I hope not!
    I just stumbled across this thread and had to comment. In my experience, the ADN program I graduated from had the same level of rigor as the private liberal arts college that I attended to receive my Business/Communications degree - without the attendant high tuition. Especially w/ oldest DS starting college next year, I took the "two" year route and will let the new employer pick up the tab for the BSN degree completion. I think implying those of us who chose the ADN route based on acedemic rigor, or lack there of, is insulting. :angryfire
    ADN candidates passed the same Boards as the nurse with the BSN, without the additional classes. But, I would never imply that that makes an ADN applicant smarter.

    P.S. I realize Michigangirl was responding to another poster, but wanted to second her statement!
    Last edit by MNmom3boys on Oct 17, '07 : Reason: see postscript
  2. 0
    Quote from AZO49008
    I'm a mid-life career changer and have a bachelor's degree in marketing. I spent 13 years in that profession and the last two positions were in management. I'll soon be entering an ADN program.

    Will the fact that I have a previous bachelor's degree and spent time in management come into play when seeking a promotion at some point in my future career?
    Let's say I have a BSN,worked for 13 years in it and go back to school to work in business. Will I get a leg up when I graduate and go to work in the stock market?????


    The fact is all of life's experiences help us in many ways, not all written in stone. If you are a successful employee, you are more likely to be successful at some things and less successful in others. From what I see it can go both ways. Some people use what made them successful in previous careers, to be successful in another. I worked in business and did just that.

    Bbbuut........
    I have also seen many people, (frequently posters on this BB) coming from "management", or "business", or "IT", thinking that they are just going to just rock nursing to its foundations, straighten all it's problems and be awesomely vaulted to the top of the pack because of their genius. And they go down in flames, cursing all those biased nurses who eat their young and unfairness of it all.

    When you change fields, you have to let go of some of the things that worked in that field and adjust to the new one. But there are many things to be said for already having a set work ethic.

    But why do people feel that when they change fields in midlife, that they should automatically have a leg up? I expected to "start over".
  3. 2
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Let's say I have a BSN,worked for 13 years in it and go back to school to work in business. Will I get a leg up when I graduate and go to work in the stock market?????


    The fact is all of life's experiences help us in many ways, not all written in stone. If you are a successful employee, you are more likely to be successful at some things and less successful in others. From what I see it can go both ways. Some people use what made them successful in previous careers, to be successful in another. I worked in business and did just that.

    Bbbuut........
    I have also seen many people, (frequently posters on this BB) coming from "management", or "business", or "IT", thinking that they are just going to just rock nursing to its foundations, straighten all it's problems and be awesomely vaulted to the top of the pack because of their genius. And they go down in flames, cursing all those biased nurses who eat their young and unfairness of it all.

    When you change fields, you have to let go of some of the things that worked in that field and adjust to the new one. But there are many things to be said for already having a set work ethic.

    But why do people feel that when they change fields in midlife, that they should automatically have a leg up? I expected to "start over".
    I have never been a nurse, nor have I worked as a stock broker, so I can't comment on that. However, since most nursing care is performed under the umbrella of a business, I don't think it is unreasonable for someone with extensive business experience to have ideas or input for improvement. Working in IT for 10 years, the majority of my time was spent studying all kinds of business processes. Now a nursing student for less than 1 semester, we have spent a good deal of time studying the nursing process. (And it seems to be rather important to you all!)

    I can see where it would be irritating for an experienced nurse to have to deal with someone with all these new ideas, just because they are switching careers and think they can change everything. There is ego involved on both sides, but I'm sure the inexperienced person does not have the depth of knowledge to understand why some of their suggestions are unreasonable. But, on the other hand, sometimes it takes someone thinking "outside the box" to make improvements, and it shouldn't automatically be discounted because of who makes the suggestions.

    I know I'll be starting at the bottom, and that doesn't really bother me. I just hope I'll be respected for what I do bring to the table.
    Mollypita and arciedee like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from llg
    If hospitals felt that the BSN grads were not competent, they wouldn't be hiring them. But they DO hire them, because they understand that grads from all 3 types of programs can do the job.[/B]
    It's not just about the ability to get hired as a new nurse but also how smooth a transition the graduate wants from student to professional. Different schools' clinical experiences can vary a lot even if the number of clinical hours is identical. If a person is concerned about their ability to pick up on clinical work, they might prefer a school with known reputation for a strong clinical education. If a certain local program has a clearly stronger reputation for turning out clinically strong graduates, that might be a deciding factor for some, regardless of whether the degree is a ADN or BSN.

    Sure, you can expect to pick up more clinical skills during your new nurse orientation, but there's so much else to learn at that time that some might prefer to have stronger clinical skills right out of school. Many new nurses find the transition from student to nurse VERY stressful and for some having a stronger clinical foundation might make that transition less stressful... and might even keep them in nursing at the bedside as opposed to be overwhelmed and leaving bedside nursing altogether.
  5. 1
    Quote from jjjoy
    It's not just about the ability to get hired as a new nurse but also how smooth a transition the graduate wants from student to professional. Different schools' clinical experiences can vary a lot even if the number of clinical hours is identical. If a person is concerned about their ability to pick up on clinical work, they might prefer a school with known reputation for a strong clinical education. If a certain local program has a clearly stronger reputation for turning out clinically strong graduates, that might be a deciding factor for some, regardless of whether the degree is a ADN or BSN.

    Sure, you can expect to pick up more clinical skills during your new nurse orientation, but there's so much else to learn at that time that some might prefer to have stronger clinical skills right out of school. Many new nurses find the transition from student to nurse VERY stressful and for some having a stronger clinical foundation might make that transition less stressful... and might even keep them in nursing at the bedside as opposed to be overwhelmed and leaving bedside nursing altogether.
    I've coordinated orientation programs for many years (and in many different states) over my 30 year career. I have definitely NOT found it to be true that BSN new grads have particular problems surviving the first year of practice. In fact, as more BSN programs are including senior-year practicums, many of those BSN grads are more clinically prepared than their ADN counterparts -- particularly in specialties such as intensive care.

    Of course that's not true in every community as all types of programs vary from school to school. But it is wrong to assume that ADN grads are superior to their BSN counterparts or that they have an easier time of transition from student to professional. There are way too many factors that come into play for individual people to make that generalization -- and I am pretty sure that there is no research that supports that assumption.
    Tweety likes this.
  6. 1
    i have a b.a in english/education and am in an "adn" program however to get my bsn all i need to do is take a couple more classes (statistics, nutrition, organic chem). we live in a small community and one of the state universities offers a distance learning program for adn's that want a bsn with or without a prior ba/bs. in fact, i took one of the classes that i will need along with my other nursing courses this last quarter.
    another option (the one i'm most interested in) is the master's program for rn's that have a prior ba in another feild but became an rn via the "adn" route like myself.
    Mollypita likes this.


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