Need advice .

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    I am currently going to be a freshman at CSUB. I'm there to get my BSN but i just recently talked to one of my peer advisors who recently decided to pursue a career in nursing he basically was trying to give me some tips on how to go about things . He told me that if he was me he would go and get his Associates Degree in 2 years first and then work and do an online course for my BSN at the same time which would mean i would get the BSN in 3 years with a whole years worth of work experience plus some cash . I don't know if i should take his advice or just go to school for the 4 years straight to get my BSN? please help.
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  4. 0
    Quote from Jlara16
    I am currently going to be a freshman at CSUB. I'm there to get my BSN but i just recently talked to one of my peer advisors who recently decided to pursue a career in nursing he basically was trying to give me some tips on how to go about things . He told me that if he was me he would go and get his Associates Degree in 2 years first and then work and do an online course for my BSN at the same time which would mean i would get the BSN in 3 years with a whole years worth of work experience plus some cash . I don't know if i should take his advice or just go to school for the 4 years straight to get my BSN? please help.
    The ADN program itself is 2 years long but ADN programs have prerequisites which can take another year or two so when you consider that, it's not faster.

    I, personally, do not see the appeal of going for your ADN first if your ultimate goal is BSN. In my area, there are hardly any jobs for new grads and BSN is required for hospital positions so the idea that you'll have a guaranteed job upon graduation and get to work/make money for a year while completing your BSN just isn't so.
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    If you have the support to go and obtain your BSN, I think it is probably a good idea. Firstly, some hospitals seem to prefer BSN, so you will have far more job opportunities when you graduate. secondly, as Kel pointed out, the ADN programs have prerequisites- so its actually often at least 3 years or 4 to do the pre-req's and then to do ADN program. So you aren't really saving any time.

    There is also the "risk" if you will of getting the ADN, and starting to work and suddenly life gets in the way and you never get the BSN. Having a BSN opens a lot of doors beyond the bedside. (That may not seem important now, but it will seem important 10-15 years into your career.

    Your advisor does not have a bad idea, the problem is that perhaps he/she did not understand that you would have to do all the pre-reqs (usually takes about 2 years) anyway, so you might as well go ahead with the BSN.


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