Are Online RN to BSN Degrees Looked Down Upon?

  1. Hello everyone! My question is about online RN to BSN degrees. I'm currently enrolled in an ADN program in Texas and I'm considering my options for where to obtain a BSN. I cannot seem to find any classroom RN to BSN programs - the only one I could find is at UT Austin but that program is not currently active. I've heard that employers do not care if your BSN is online, as long as it is from an accredited university, but that graduate programs look down upon these degrees. Is this true? I understand that I'm still in school, but it is not a bad thing to plan ahead and I just want to leave my options open. I'm a little worried that I've just screwed myself if grad school is something I ever want to do.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    Tens of thousands of RNs earn their BSNs and MSNs and DNPs online every year. your fears are unfounded.
  4. by   Yuweezy
    Like the previous comment says, tons of people get their degree through online. It doesn’t say on your diploma whether you went to school in person or did it online.
  5. by   Shanimal
    Quote from hollyd45
    I've heard that employers do not care if your BSN is online, as long as it is from an accredited university, but that graduate programs look down upon these degrees. Is this true? I understand that I'm still in school, but it is not a bad thing to plan ahead and I just want to leave my options open. I'm a little worried that I've just screwed myself if grad school is something I ever want to do.
    I've never heard of an employer caring whether the RN-BSN was earned from an online program or not as long as it's accredited. A couple colleagues of mine earned their BSN degrees online (from schools that didn't have a brick-and-mortar presence associated with it), but after submitting grad school applications to our local university were told by the program director that their degrees "didn't count for much." While I doubt that's the attitude of all or even most graduate schools, there's certainly some discrimination out there. If you're considering graduate school later on then I don't think it matters whether the program is online or not, but rather if it has the brick-and-mortar presence to back it up--the degree is the same whether you completed the coursework online or in person. Since you're in Texas, the RN-BSN program at UT Arlington is a good example of an online program that has a well-established physical campus as well. Hope that helps some.

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