ADN is fine? - page 3

by mtruland | 3,200 Views | 28 Comments

Hello, I'm a student at UNH in Durham, NH. I am currently on a pre-nursing track to get a BSN. This is going to take me five years, as I had some trouble finding what I truly wanted to do. Through my work on my local... Read More


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    I just graduated last year with my ADN and now just finishing up my first semester in the RN-BSN program. I gotta say that this was the best decision for me. I already have almost one year of experience under my belt. The RN-BSN program is a piece of cake, since I love to write and do 10-15 pages of research assignments. PLUS, I'm earning more money than most of my classmates in the university lol. My employer has a tuition reimbursement cap of $2,000/year which is fine with me. I would rather have something than nothing at all. Goodluck and weigh the pros and cons
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    Doing the ASN to BSN complete long distance thing.. Still able to work more than fulltime and complete the course. Plus hospital floats some of the bill. We have a group of Jr's from a BSN program doing clinicals at my hospital and they asked me about the ASN to BSN fast track that I'm doing, they all got ****** and complained to me that it was'nt fair that they had to go through all that school crap and I get to do my assignments at home or at work.
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    Absolutely do the ADN and Paramedic thing. You can go anywhere and do almost anything with that combo, except teach. You can always top off the ADN with a BSN and Masters later on.
    BTW, I was an LPN who bridged to RN, and later became a State-Certified Firefighter/First Responder. Because I was a Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) my County allowed me to function as a Paramedic, when responding to calls.
    Best of luck to you!
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    Quote from Tweety
    Good reasons all.

    But just to clarify that in a lot of parts of the country it's not a "free BSN". Employers usually have a cap on what they pay. My employer pays $2300/year tuition reimbursement. Most other folks in my class have a similar cap. Depending on the school it may indeed be "free" but usually there's some out of pocket expenses, especially if you go the online route.
    And not only the cap - generally you "owe" the employer "time" in exchange for money. i.e. - they contribute X amount of tuition dollars to your BSN, and you owe them a year for each academic year they pay for/partially pay for, or something similar.

    Read the fine print carefully, or you could end up overly obligated to someplace you hate.
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    Quote from Tweety
    Employers usually have a cap on what they pay. My employer pays $2300/year tuition reimbursement. Most other folks in my class have a similar cap.
    Yep, my employer pays $1,000 yearly as a tuition reimbursement. That will barely pay for the books and school supplies, and it sure isn't enough to cover the cost of the classes.
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    I am in the same boat - trying to figure out what to do!!! I already have a BA (Music) but I am not interested in doing an Accelerated BSN program as I am having a child this fall and don't think I could a handle an intense 12 month program. I am applying for programs for Fall 2008 and am torn between BSN and ADN programs. Because of my family plans, I am leaning more toward the ADN programs (so much cheaper, perhaps a little easier, etc). However, so many people have told me that the BSN is the way to go and I'll regret it if I don't do it now. But then again, reading through this forum, it sounds relatively painless to pick up a BSN later. What is the work load like? I would want to continue working while picking up the BSN later - would this be feasible with a child and a life in addition to job and school?

    So many choices to make! Glad to have found this forum.
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    Quote from nursetobein2010
    I am applying for programs for Fall 2008 and am torn between BSN and ADN programs. Because of my family plans, I am leaning more toward the ADN programs (so much cheaper, perhaps a little easier, etc).
    They are not any easier...remember, students graduating from ADN programs take the exact same boards as BS/BSN students....so the nursing content is virtually the same. The 4 year programs have more community and management, but they aren't any harder!
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    Quote from momof2RN
    I went the ADN route and have never regretted it. After a two year break from school, I went back and completed my BSN totally online. My employer also paid for my BSN, so it was a win-win situation for me. I worked full-time (and had a newborn and toddler) while completing the program and never really had much problem. Luckily, I also have a fabulous husband who supported me every step of the way.
    Good luck with whatever you decide on.

    Hi Mom of 2<
    What on-line BSN program did you choose? I'd be interested in that route too.

    Thanks!
  9. 0
    I also went the ADN route and glad i did. Like the others have stated, it is cheaper, faster......yet you receive the same education. The nursing education is two year regardless.

    I graduated in may 2006 and now working in a hospital setting. My job is paying for me to get my RN-MSN in FULL and I start in this fall.

    So not only did I do it cheaper but i will also receive my BSN and MSN in less time than it would take the 4 year student that enter at the same time..... because i have the 1 year working experience behind me.

    ....but whatever decision you make, nurising is the way to go. We need more nurses and im glad you've choosen this field. God Bless.


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