opening clogged PICC, with a wire???? - page 2

by SWAT_RN 9,819 Views | 13 Comments

Howdy all, recent events make me have to ask... I was taught if a PICC became clogged, non-functional, get the order for tpa and follow p&p yada, yada. Well, we tried that x2 and the sucker was still plugged tight. I'm... Read More


  1. 0
    The original post is about a wire being inserted into the PICC to declot it. That is what we are responding to.
  2. 0
    Sure, but it's taken us to some neat places
  3. 0
    I think one aspect that may increse confusion is that in my experience few radiology employees including RNs are that well versed on INS standards. I have not read them for several years.... considering I place central lines I should review them since I am still a nurse I could be held to thoes standards.

    I think the concensus of this thread so far is that you should avoid releasing embolic material into the blood stream whenever possible. The facility in question should address the role of the rad tech, rn and radiologist to increase communication and reduce potential conflicts with nursing staff out of the hospital.

    I come from a radiology background and we constantly release embolic material into the vascular system, everytime we revise a dialysis graft/fistula, and small dvts below the knee are not usually treated ect... but best practice woudl be to remove a clotted line and replace if possible, some patients run out of veins even with ultrasound and x-ray (intercostal piccs are not fun cases). Was there ever clarification if the tech was acting under orders from someone or did this on his own accord?

    Jeremy
  4. 1
    Wow. Talk about risks outweighing benefits! Catheter rupture,catheter embolism,wire embolism,vein perforation,pneumothorax,sepsis and I could go on. I can safely say that guidewires are not labelled for such a use and that PICC IFU's do not include roto-rootering with a wire. A reasonable and prudent act? Not by a long shot.
    LACrn likes this.


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