just informed that mom wants me to drive her kids to school - page 4

I have been on this case for 6 months. Finally there is another nurse to pick up extra hours . Mom has decided she wants the nurses to drive her kids to school,. I am blown away. The new nurse called the agency and informed me... Read More

  1. 1
    Quote from Sehille4774
    My agency has an actual clause in the employee handbook "No supernurse behavior" lol.

    love it
    please check cape at the time clock
    JustBeachyNurse likes this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 0
    I'm facing a similar situation. I've picked up a cognitively intact client with severe CP who owns a van. The client can't drive the van, but they can get in and out. Other nurses have been driving the client to appointments, visits with friends, and other places. I was surprised when I found out; I was told from day 1 that we don't transport clients. If I'm going to be with this client long-term, I may have to drive them around.

    The agency has a release form to absolve the nurse of liability if anything happens, but I wonder. I'm not crazy about minivans (I drive a compact), and despite the waiver, I still wonder about liability.
  3. 2
    Contact your auto insurance company for information about potential liability as the driver of a third party's car. Who's name is the patient's car & insurance in? In my state, no valid driver's license = not entitled to own a vehicle or obtain auto insurance. If you are physically disabled you are issued a non-driver's license and are entitled to a permanent disabled parking permit. Even minor children can obtain disabled parking permits. For those without people to drive them, Medicaid pays for transportation services for the patient and their nurse.

    I'd have an attorney review the release, worth the consultation fee as it may not hold up in the event of an accident. How on earth can you monitor/assess a patient if you are driving?!?
    amoLucia and txredheadnurse like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from Not_A_Hat_Person
    I'm facing a similar situation. I've picked up a cognitively intact client with severe CP who owns a van. The client can't drive the van, but they can get in and out. Other nurses have been driving the client to appointments, visits with friends, and other places. I was surprised when I found out; I was told from day 1 that we don't transport clients. If I'm going to be with this client long-term, I may have to drive them around.

    The agency has a release form to absolve the nurse of liability if anything happens, but I wonder. I'm not crazy about minivans (I drive a compact), and despite the waiver, I still wonder about liability.
    If you don't want to do this, then move on to another case. No one can force you to drive the patient around. Just find a case where driving is not expected.
    vintagestudent likes this.
  5. 0
    I never allowed the nurses to watch the other children. What if one of them was choking and at the same time my son needed emergency suctioning or was turning blue?

    Even if the agency gives you a liability waiver, your insurance company may not cover you since you are using the vehicle for work.

    If this is an otherwise "normal" mom, can you just talk to her and explain the danger of watching the other kid and how if you are driving, you would be unable to assess, monitor and provide treatment for your actual patient? Maybe she will see the light.
  6. 0
    too much liability and really, is that your job???? You are not a servant and hopefully, your agency will not perpetuate that notion.
  7. 0
    Unlikely that she'll see the light. The fact that she even asked.
  8. 2
    I turned down the assignment, as well as another that involves driving the client home from their day program. I'll go on outings with clients, but I don't want to end up investigated by the BON for Failure to Respond because I was looking for a place to park in a crisis.
    caliotter3 and JustBeachyNurse like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from caliotter3
    My client is pushing me to do uncompensated babysitting again. She is taking advantage of me big time. I have told her that I can not legally give her an extra two or three hours on X day, then leave early two or three hours on Y day, but she seems to think that I can and I should. So, that leaves me in the catbird seat. Do I tell the agency to put a stop to it? Anyway you look at the situation, I will be the one without a job. The clients learn to manipulate us so well.
    I was asked to do the same. My humble reply was, "Umm, no." I explained why I could not do that. Furthermore, I refuse to be manipulated by clients. I worked too hard and my family sacrificed a lot for my license to put it on the line for an ungrateful/abusive PCG and I have no problem diplomatically conveying this to my shameless client. If I am dismissed from the assignment, so be it. There are other assignments to be had. It just sickens me that some nurses allow themselves to be manipulated as in the end the nurse is the one who loses. The PCG gets free nanny care, the agency gets their money, but the nurse is left overly tired and feeling abused. That's unacceptable.

    Caliotter3, stick to your job description and let the chips fall where they may. Home health nursing is here to stay and there will always be other clients who need and appreciate our compassion and skills. Stand your ground, fellow nurse.

    Peace.
  10. 0
    kgress, that mom is seriously kooky. I hope you turned in your notice. Stick to your job description and you'll be fine. Don't give these shameless primary caregivers an inch because they'll often take a football field and then turn on you when you refuse to mow the lawn for them and repair the plumbing, lol. Believe me, I've seen these PCG's do the Jeckle n Hyde thing on kind-hearted nurses far too often. My advice: Avoid the PCGs like the plague!

    Hope things work out for you in a better home setting, fellow nurse.

    Peace.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top