What can I do to better my chances of being accepted

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    I need a ton of advice I'm in the early stages of planning the start of a nursing career. I have a year of prereqs to complete before I can apply to any program. Here's my story I first graduated college nearly 7 years ago with a bachelor's in biology. I worked in a lab and as a lab educator for a short time. The last 4 years I have been working in childcare. The last two years I've felt a strong pull towards nursing and this last year have started working on prereqs. I'm mostly taking classes I missed the first time around and retaking classes I didn't do well in because I didn't take college as seriously as I should have the first time around. Ultimately, I want to be a pediatric nurse practitioner I am unsure of how to get there. I do not have a medical or healthcare background at all and I think that will hurt me as an applicant even for a direct entry programs. Aside from grades and test scores, what are some ways I can boost my application? Would it be better for me to take the 18 month to 2 year route and become an RN and then apply as opposed to going the direct entry route. I will also need to work while in school no matter what educational path I pursue.
  2. 4 Comments so far...

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    Hi! I just got into a direct entry MSN-Family Nurse Practitioner program. I start in January, I'm so excited! I'm 28, I have a B.A. in Communication and a background in finance, business, and library services. Absolutely no healthcare experience. But for the past two years, I decided to make a career change and go into nursing, with an ultimate goal of becoming a nurse practitioner. I took my pre-reqs while volunteering at a hospital (while still working at my then current job at a library). While my grades were high and competitive, I think that volunteer experience really helped me. It was a great way to show the school that I really wanted this by getting involved in healthcare, and understood what the nursing world was about since I had that floor experience.

    Also, keep in mind that direct entry MSN programs will look at your Bachelor's degree and GPA. You should ask the schools what is the minimum GPA requirement from your undergrad deress, plus what is a good competitive undergrad GPA that most admitted students from the past had.

    Good luck to you!
    Aussierules1985 likes this.
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    Thank you for your advice! I have looked into volunteering at hospitals in my area, and right now they all only want someone to come in certain days of the week. Unfortunately it's the same days and hours I need to work at my ft job. I'm going to keep looking. I'm thinking of inquiring at smaller practices and health care facilities. Congrats on your acceptance.
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    Do what you can. Volunteering is great.. But realistically unless your applying to Duke, Penn, NYU or Vandy..
    you can get in a NON-direct MSN from non-nursing (as in get a BSN). Just do your best on the GPA, and study your butt off for the GRE.

    Thankfully my area was less competitive for the GRE scores, and although i was above average, for the area, i was well above the normal admissions avg.

    Personally a traditional admissions for Masters in nursing mostly IMO would be based on

    1)undergrad GPA
    2)GRE
    3)experience (i really do believe that even not having nursing experience, and being not 20 is a serious advantage. patients always will think that an older person will know more... its the reality we live in. Plus the admissions will probably think a second career person may be more goal directed.)

    Good luck!
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    Quote from Aussierules1985
    (i really do believe that even not having nursing experience, and being not 20 is a serious advantage. patients always will think that an older person will know more... its the reality we live in. Plus the admissions will probably think a second career person may be more goal directed.)

    Good luck!
    This is very true. I know that they don't like people to be too young in my direct entry program. The majority of my class is in their late 20s or 30s.


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