MS versus DNP - page 3

by B00P

5,614 Views | 33 Comments

So, just to give a background on what I know (or what I think I know); here it goes... Some CRNA programs I have been looking at are programs where the CRNA student gets a Master's degree when they graduate. Other CRNA... Read More


  1. 0
    Where I am going to be starting school it looks like they will offer the DNAP if you want to continue on in the program. However I am concerned as I have been reading a lot of dialog about the degree not having much clinical content, either in lecture or hands on content. Reading the brochure it states:

    "The DNAP emphasizes knowledge development beyond that of entry-level nurse anesthesia programs by including coursework in patient safety and human factors, quality assessment and improvement, health care systems and organizations, leadership, evidence-based research, statistics, and adult education."

    this is why I was wondering what people doing the phd are getting their degree in. I am not sure that the DNAP is right for me, and it seems that I will have to do doctorate at some point.
  2. 0
    Quote from missnurse01
    this is why I was wondering what people doing the phd are getting their degree in. I am not sure that the DNAP is right for me, and it seems that I will have to do doctorate at some point.
    There is no reason you would have to get a doctorate at any point unless your goal is to teach at a university. For practicing CRNAs the masters will be all thats needed.
    I don't plan on getting a doctorate and if I did it sure as heck would not be a DNAP or DNP.
  3. 0
    I was worried about the moving between states and being able to be relicensed in the future as a crna. We tend to move around a lot and would hate to have a requirement of suddenly needing a doctorate to work in a different state. I know nothing is set now...

    I also feel that a phd and not dnap would be more advantageous
  4. 0
    What's the difference between DNAP and DNP?
  5. 0
    Quote from SUNFL0WER
    What's the difference between DNAP and DNP?
    The DNP curriculum was set up by the AACN, and is through a school of nursing. A DNAP is a CRNA specific clinical doctorate that is approved through the nurse anesthetists council of accreditation. The DNAP has more latitude in the type of program that can be set up. The DNAP program that I chose had an additional 12 semester hours in advanced/applied science along with the option to specialize in nurse anesthesia education/administration. The DNAP came about because many nurse anesthesia schools are not in schools of nursing and cannot offer an MSN/DNP degree.
    Last edit by wtbcrna on Jan 5, '13
  6. 0
    So if I did not wish to teach, would a DNP be sufficient? I feel a DNAP sounds like it is more specific to a nurse anesthetist, but if a DNP would get me to the same place as a DNAP depending on my school of choice, it doesn't really matter?

    That last run on sentence is confusing and probably doesn't make sense. It's just all of these different degrees that virtually give you the same thing is confusing me. I don't want to make a mistake of doing something I don't want to by not knowing what it means.

    I keep trying to relate it to the RN thing. I wanted to be in a 4-year BSN program because it would give me everything at one time without having to go back to school or have wide gaps between applying elsewhere, as opposed to getting an ADN or a traditional 2-year BSN (pre-requisties done before applying). Now, I'm just trying to figure what would be the best route to take for a CRNA with the same motive; get it all done at one time in one place.

    If that makes any sense, please help me! If it doesn't, I'll try to explain what is confusing.

    Thank you so much!
  7. 0
    Quote from SUNFL0WER
    So if I did not wish to teach, would a DNP be sufficient? I feel a DNAP sounds like it is more specific to a nurse anesthetist, but if a DNP would get me to the same place as a DNAP depending on my school of choice, it doesn't really matter?

    That last run on sentence is confusing and probably doesn't make sense. It's just all of these different degrees that virtually give you the same thing is confusing me. I don't want to make a mistake of doing something I don't want to by not knowing what it means.

    I keep trying to relate it to the RN thing. I wanted to be in a 4-year BSN program because it would give me everything at one time without having to go back to school or have wide gaps between applying elsewhere, as opposed to getting an ADN or a traditional 2-year BSN (pre-requisties done before applying). Now, I'm just trying to figure what would be the best route to take for a CRNA with the same motive; get it all done at one time in one place.

    If that makes any sense, please help me! If it doesn't, I'll try to explain what is confusing.

    Thank you so much!
    http://www.aana.com/newsandjournal/D...409_p92-96.pdf
  8. 0
    [QUOTE=SUNFL0WER;7101289]So if I did not wish to teach, would a DNP be sufficient?


    If you dont want to teach there is no reason to ever get a doctorate in anything ever
  9. 0
    I will have to disagree with that. People use doctorates to become administrators, researchers, educators, and/or just for their edification/personal fulfillment. There is more than one reason to get a doctorate degree.
    Last edit by wtbcrna on Jan 5, '13
  10. 0
    Wtbcrna: I agree with you. My inner nerd is really looking forward to obtaining my doctorate for my own enjoyment and fulfillment, though I may not pursue it until well after CRNA school, depending on where I eventually attend school.


Top