CRNA schedule

  1. 0
    I'm thinking of specializing as a CRNA eventually and I'm curious as to what the normal schedule is for one. Monday-Friday? or Weekends and weird hours? I had originally planned on becoming a doctor but chose nursing for the heavier emphasis on human interaction and less demanding schedule in school/work. I wanted to have a life and a family. Being a CRNA seems extremely interesting and involves all the aspects of medicine that I was interested in but i'm worried it will be equally time consuming. Can you guys please give me some input?

    thanks :-)
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  4. 3
    Hello--

    I am not a CRNA, but I am an Anesthesia Tech in a large level 1 trauma hospital.

    There are over 100 CRNAs in our hospital. Since there are so many CRNAs, they are able to work almost any schedule they choose. It's safe to say that flexibility will depend on where you work, but overall it appears to me that CRNAs have no problem balancing work and family. I cannot begin to tell you the variety of shifts I see people working---8s, 10s, 12s, 16s, and 24s. Those who work 8s (6:30a-3p), work 5 days a week. Some who work 10s work 4 days a week etc. Some of our 10 hr shifts are from 1p-11p, some of our 12 hr shifts are 11a-11p, and the traditional 12/hr shift is 6:30a-6:30p. I know one CRNA who works a 12, and a 24, and is done for the week. He usually works in another hospital on his off days. People don't have a hard time trading days or giving away call shifts, because there is always someone willing to trade, or pick up the shift for the extra money. I don't fully understand how their vacations work. I know its based on where your name falls in that particular month. But say for example, your name is at the top of May---then that is your vacation month. People even trade Vacation months--I see it posted all the time, "my vacation month is June, I need December can someone help me out?" And 90% of the time you can find someone willing to help you out. Some of them are able to take an entire month off if need be. I am not sure if I have fully answered your question, but I just wanted to add my !
    a_damsel, MyNameRN, and Aggiejane07 like this.
  5. 2
    I am a student nurse anesthetist graduating in a couple months. School is VERY demanding on your time, but after that you can write your ticket to any time you want that will work for you and your family. I would suggest if you haven't started a family yet to wait until you graduate from the program to do so. But, if you do have kids it is doable...there is a couple of people in my class that have children, I can just imagine it is a lot harder to budget your time. I too wanted to be a doctor and changed my major to nursing knowing that I wanted to become a nurse anesthetist because I felt it was the next best thing and I am very glad with my decision!
    nomoreIT and Aggiejane07 like this.
  6. 5
    As a previous post eluded, there are many jobs out there with shift work. However, a lot of jobs require call as well. This does not mean you will necessarily be working more. But you do have to be cautious as to what call positions will entail. I even know some CRNAs that work shift work and also take call. Taking call position where you are in a "leaving order", usually results in your being able to leave based on when you 'where' on call or when you 'will' be on call, will usually allow you to be 'cut' [go home] when rooms start coming down. These sort of models often will have pre-call, post-call, and sometimes 'day of call' days off. I work in this type of paradigm. The disadvantage is never knowing exactly what time you will be getting off. However, as you become more familiar with the OR norms and customary times to leave in a specific leaving spot, you can usually guess when you might be getting out. The key to this type of model if not being short staffed of CRNAs. This will result in longer hours. At my facility, the docs and CRNAs are in the same 'leaving order.' This means that when the numbers of rooms down hits my spot on the list a doc or CRNA will relieve me to go home. It creates equity in our group. The leaving order is sacred. Right now I work around 38 to 40 a week, including my worked call hours.

    The reality is, there are more ways to schedule anesthesia services than can be counted. In my area, there about 10 facilities all employing CRNAs. I don't think you can find two identical systems. Although, many will share common traits, the method or manner in which equity is achieved varies widely. One of the main reasons why CRNAs change jobs in the first two years is related to their understanding of what kind of schedule they want, to meet their varying needs, and the experience they gain over time that leads to a better understanding of how to attain it. It is very difficult to understand many of the systems out there while in school or just out. I hope this help--as complicated as it might sound.

    Quote from Aggiejane07
    I'm thinking of specializing as a CRNA eventually and I'm curious as to what the normal schedule is for one. Monday-Friday? or Weekends and weird hours? I had originally planned on becoming a doctor but chose nursing for the heavier emphasis on human interaction and less demanding schedule in school/work. I wanted to have a life and a family. Being a CRNA seems extremely interesting and involves all the aspects of medicine that I was interested in but i'm worried it will be equally time consuming. Can you guys please give me some input?

    thanks :-)
    nomoreIT, CCRN-CMC-CSC, lovegasRN, and 2 others like this.


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