PhD/DNP in Nursing.... what incentives does the State and Federal Gov offer? - page 2

by rtx723

The IOM and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released a report called the The Future of Nursing... It talks about increasing BSN nurses to 80% by 2020, doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020, APN to have full... Read More


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    No, the Nurse Faculty Loan Program (NFLP). The Schools with this federal support are listed at https://ersrs.hrsa.gov/ReportServer?...Format=HTML3.2.

    The NFLP loans can be forgiven up to 85% if you are full-time nursing faculty for four years at any accredited nursing program in the US (or territories).
    JenRN30 likes this.
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    Good to know. I will have to keep this handy! Thanks!
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    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Well the real bottle neck in the system if they are truly intending to get to 80% BSN in 8 years is that in areas like CA and probably across the country 80% of new RN's are graduating from community/junior colleges. So those schools simply aren't able to issue BSN's since they are by design 2 year colleges only.

    Now in theory they could do what has happened in my home country in NZ when professions that were primarily taught at the polytechnics (which did not issue bachelors level degrees) demanded higher levels of education the polytechnics paired up with the local university to be able to issue certain degrees.

    So if say a CA community college could pair up with a CSU/UC to issue a BSN then that's an option otherwise I don't see any change soon. All those community colleges aren't going to be willing to get rid of their most popular degrees
    I think that more schools will be doing this. I just got accepted to an "AAS/BSN Concurrent Enrollment Program" here in Arizona. Basically each semester I am taking extra "BSN" classes tacked on to the Associate level nursing courses. It makes sense.....I hope more community colleges will offer this option because it does save money!
    rgbrn likes this.


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