Masters degree....

  1. What is a nurse called after they get a masters degree?
    In order to be a NP do you need to get your masters degree?

    TIA!
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    Here a NP is a masters degree. They sign their name with an like this "Julie Smith, ARNP"

    A nurse with a masters degree uses the initials of his/her degree after their name. Such as "Julie Smith,RN, MSN". They aren't necessarily called anything other than what they are, such as an educator, manager, clinical nurse specialist, etc.
  4. by   Ariel70113
    Quote from Tweety
    Here a NP is a masters degree. They sign their name with an like this "Julie Smith, ARNP"

    A nurse with a masters degree uses the initials of his/her degree after their name. Such as "Julie Smith,RN, MSN". They aren't necessarily called anything other than what they are, such as an educator, manager, clinical nurse specialist, etc.
    oh okay!

    Also, another question.....

    I'm planning on getting my RN and then soon after getting my Masters. Is there a difference in pay??
  5. by   Tweety
    Quote from Ariel70113
    oh okay!

    Also, another question.....

    I'm planning on getting my RN and then soon after getting my Masters. Is there a difference in pay??

    Depends on the job you take with your Masters. For example I'm maxed out in my pay as a floor nurse, if I were to get my masters and take a teaching job it would be cut in pay. (better hours and no weekends though, it might be worth it). Nurses usually pursue Masters degrees because they have a passion for what their doing, not necessarily big bucks.
  6. by   Ariel70113
    Quote from Tweety
    Depends on the job you take with your Masters. For example I'm maxed out in my pay as a floor nurse, if I were to get my masters and take a teaching job it would be cut in pay. (better hours and no weekends though, it might be worth it). Nurses usually pursue Masters degrees because they have a passion for what their doing, not necessarily big bucks.
    Oic! Thanks!
  7. by   elkpark
    NP programs are almost all MSN programs, and 49 states require an MSN to practice as an NP. The exception is California -- there are still a few NP "certificate" (NOT Master's degree) programs in CA. However, graduates of those programs are only able to practice within the state of CA; their credentials are not recognized by any other state, and they cannot get national certification as an NP.

    As Tweety noted, how much more (or less) money you would make depends on your job. Teaching positions are notoriously underpaid; there are many cushy clinical NP positions that pay a lot more than working as a staff nurse; there are many clinical NP positions (working in a public clinic in an underserved area, for instance) that might well pay less than you could make as a well-paid staff nurse.

    I would never advise or encourage anyone to go to grad school in nursing just because they were interested in making more money. If that is the main motivation, there are much easier ways of increasing your income than getting a graduate degree!
  8. by   Ariel70113
    Quote from elkpark
    NP programs are almost all MSN programs, and 49 states require an MSN to practice as an NP. The exception is California -- there are still a few NP "certificate" (NOT Master's degree) programs in CA. However, graduates of those programs are only able to practice within the state of CA; their credentials are not recognized by any other state, and they cannot get national certification as an NP.

    As Tweety noted, how much more (or less) money you would make depends on your job. Teaching positions are notoriously underpaid; there are many cushy clinical NP positions that pay a lot more than working as a staff nurse; there are many clinical NP positions (working in a public clinic in an underserved area, for instance) that might well pay less than you could make as a well-paid staff nurse.

    I would never advise or encourage anyone to go to grad school in nursing just because they were interested in making more money. If that is the main motivation, there are much easier ways of increasing your income than getting a graduate degree!
    thanks for replying!

    The reason I was asking about the pay is because I wasn't sure if the pay differed or not.

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