BSN or CNL to FNP - how to get from here to there?

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    Hey all,

    I posted this reply on another thread but wanted to open it up for discussion in a more public place.

    I am considering the entry-level CNL program at a school I have basically already been promised acceptance at. Going through this program with no room for a summer internship would spit me out in two years with an MSN without nursing experience, in same time it would take for a BSN + summer externship experience.


    SOOOO... CNL input?

    I am considering an entry-level masters without any prior nursing experience for one reason: better chance of getting hired once entering the job market. Sure, many employers may not have a "CNL position" just yet, but since most CNLs begin as staff nurses anyway, would they beat out a non-experienced BSN graduate in a competitive job market because they have that Masters?

    I want to be an FNP too. I wonder if I should go through the BSN then work then try for a FNP degree, or get a MSN in this CNL thing (which could really just apply itself as a generalist bedside nurse with a Masters, no?) and then make the route to FNP shorter after working some years by completing a post-certificate in FNP?

    What do you think? Already I have a non-nursing bachelors and am a preschool teacher. I want to do pediatrics or FNP so badly!!!!!!!

    Thanks!
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  4. 0
    There are a bunch of existing threads here on the CNL role -- have you looked at them?

    No one in my entire region (in the Southeast) is using CNLs, period. And I think it's highly debatable that an MSN would give you an edge in hiring for entry level, new grad positions over those who went through a traditional, conventional nursing program. I'm certainly no expert on that question, however.

    You say that the CNL program would take the same amount of time as a BSN program. Is there a significant difference in cost between the CNL program and any BSN program(s) you may have looked at? If you're going to be taking out student loans, even a relatively small difference in the principal of any loans you take out now will be a big difference in cost by the time you've paid back the loans with interest over years.

    Have you looked at any accelerated BSN programs? Those are for people who already have a BA/BS in another subject, and typically take 12-18 months (depending on the individual school).

    Also, if you know you want to end up an FNP (or pedi NP), have you looked at direct entry MSN programs that would put you directly into an NP program?

    Best wishes for your journey!
  5. 0
    Thanks for responding! I am avoiding an accelerated program because I want a summer externship employer with which to secure a relationship and return to once I graduate. Accelerated programs leave no summer with which to gain work experience in between years. I also believe that accelerated programs are responsible for the increase in nursing graduates without jobs -- too many nurses, not enough open positions.

    I realize that CNL is an example of an accelerate route which also offers no summer externship, but am wondering if the Masters earned ups the chances of landing a job after graduation.
    Last edit by newmusic on Apr 10, '11 : Reason: grammar
  6. 0
    Quote from nursemusic
    wondering if the Masters earned ups the chances of landing a job after graduation.
    As I answered in your parallel post, I don't think so. Based on what I've observed of the graduates from my DEMSN/CNL program, only a couple were hired "cold." The others who were hired were taken on at places where they either (a) did their clinicals or preceptorships or (b) had a relationship with somebody on the inside.

    You may actually find a distinct bias AGAINST the DEMSN folks (that is, the "how can you have an MS without experience" comments). Look around this site... you'll find plenty of examples.
  7. 0
    Thanks for your attention! I am aware of the biases in both directions. In other fields, like teaching, you can't possibly have any work experience without a specific degree, so getting a masters in nursing didn't sound totally unreasonable when I was considering it. Like everybody else, I am trying to figure out the best way to get hired. Maybe to enroll at a teaching hospital is the best bet.
  8. 0
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    As I answered in your parallel post, I don't think so. Based on what I've observed of the graduates from my DEMSN/CNL program, only a couple were hired "cold." The others who were hired were taken on at places where they either (a) did their clinicals or preceptorships or (b) had a relationship with somebody on the inside.

    You may actually find a distinct bias AGAINST the DEMSN folks (that is, the "how can you have an MS without experience" comments). Look around this site... you'll find plenty of examples.
    Oh, and I should mention -- did you keep tabs on most of your fellow DEMSN grads? Do you know any who didn't find work?


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