Do You Have LPN's in your PICU? - page 3

by Chevelle | 9,463 Views | 23 Comments

Hi everyone! Thanks for taking the time to answer. I am just wondering if you have LPN's on your PICU. The reason I am asking was because I was watching a coverage thing on tv today and they were in the PICU...the PICU had a... Read More


  1. 1
    Reading all of these comments helps me understand differences in areas and states. I am going to become an RN one way or another, but right now its not feasible with money concerns, so I am going to go for becoming a CNA, and then become an LPN. I will hopefully by the time that schooling is done, find a good entry level BSN online like Western Governors University or some other new program that may be in the works right now.

    Hoping for it because I really want to become an RN. I am okay with working in LTC for now as a care giver.
    Amber628 likes this.
  2. 0
    I live in one of those states where the nurse practice act for lpn's is intentionally vauge and hospitals set their own standards. I have known quite a few LPN's practicing in the ICU setting, but they all worked in smaller hospitals or in more rural areas. All of the big hospitals in my area either no longer hire LPN's or don't allow them in critical care.
    I was a LPN working in peds before I became an RN working in PICU. Honestly, I didn't learn any new skills in RN school that I didn't learn in LPN school first. I'd been able to hang blood, handle all IV skills, bolus all but a few cardiac meds. The Initial RN assessment was about the only thing out of my scope of practice that I can remember. I learned all the technical skills for PICU on the unit during orientation. But each hospital varies. I was able to d/c central line's/picc's as an LPN in peds with just a check off by an RN, but now as an RN in a bigger peds facility, I can't d/c either. I could hang blood as an LPN in certain clinical facilities I rotated though, but other hospitals didn't allow it.
    I do know that there is a big variation in the acuity level of the PICU's/NICU's in our state. Basically anything very critical or complex gets transferred to our large children's hospital, and the smaller facilities only handle stuff I would consider "step down" worthy.
  3. 0
    Nope - all RNs except our one clerk.
  4. 0
    Quote from scurbro
    Reading all of these comments helps me understand differences in areas and states. I am going to become an RN one way or another, but right now its not feasible with money concerns, so I am going to go for becoming a CNA, and then become an LPN. I will hopefully by the time that schooling is done, find a good entry level BSN online like Western Governors University or some other new program that may be in the works right now.

    Hoping for it because I really want to become an RN. I am okay with working in LTC for now as a care giver.
    I'm a retired PICU LPN and we still have a few LPNs left working in the PICU where I retired, but as a general rule they no longer hire LPNs in critical care. When an LPN retires, they are replaced with an RN. As the above poster mentioned, I worked in a state with a broad scope of practice for LPNs and I could do everything except the admission assessment....so I simply didn't do new admits. I also didn't take charge, carry the code beeper, serve a patients primary nurse and write the care plan or train to be an ECMO tech. Otherwise, I took care of my own patients under my license and there was very little for my RN charge nurse to have to do for me....usually just checked blood products with me before I gave them.

    I would advise you to get your BSN ASAP from a good nursing program with a good reputation and skip the LPN route if possible. Getting that BSN will not make you a better nurse, but it will give you the most options in your career. It will give you the best job security as well. Online BSNs are extremely expensive and many have questionable credentials. The hospital from which I retired will not consider applicants who have an online BSN for positions that require that degree. Your best bet is your local state school which will also be the most cost effective. AVOID the for profit schools that could care less about your qualifications and just want your money.

    Best to you,
    Mrs H.


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