What certs required for Peds floor/ER?

  1. What certifications are required as a Peds floor nurse and as a Peds ER nurse? Specifically, PALS and ACLS (or the ped version of those).

    Also, can you get those while you're still in school or do you have to be a working RN?

    Thanks!
    •  
  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   sara52g
    Quote from meredithT
    What certifications are required as a Peds floor nurse and as a Peds ER nurse? Specifically, PALS and ACLS (or the ped version of those).

    Also, can you get those while you're still in school or do you have to be a working RN?

    Thanks!
    In my experience, to work on a peds floor you are usually just required to have basic CPR and then possibly take PALS within a few years of working. For the peds ER ro ICU, PALS is mandatory. Any of these courses can be taken by anyone in the general public, however most hospitals or organizations will offer special ones for health care professionals that are more focused on what you would practically need to know in your job, and maybe more physiology than the standard classes.
    Good Luck
  4. by   babynurselsa
    ACLS and PALS are usually only offered to persons with a license....RN, LPN, MD, EMT etc. THink drugs and electricity....
    Some places will allow someone without a license to attend the class but they will not card you.
    If you go to work in wither ER or peds your employer should offer you the chance to attend these classes.
  5. by   MissJoRN
    I strongly encourage nurses to take PALS asap (PALS is the "peds version" of ACLS) I think PALS has a strong emphasis and early recognition/ intervention/ prevention that is so important! Also in peds it's good to redefine the word "code" as you're used to with adults or school. Rapid response teams aside, traditionally you didn't call a code in the adult world until arrest actually occurred. In peds you typically really see them coming and call (a good) code team to "code" your kid during distress. You actually start CPR for ineffective breathing not absent breathing.

    I said "good code team" since I actually worked in a hospital that was very adult based and the RTs and residents were so uncomfortable with peds that 2 peds nurses or even a lone peds nurse and well trained aide handled resp distress far better than the official code team. if I heard "why did you call? that baby's fine. Look his sats are 94%!" one more time I might have killed someone. Adult based people can get so hung up on those sats that they miss the retractions, tachypnea, and decreased breath sounds! Then we were arguing whether to act instead of acting. Our residents (but not RTs!) had to take PALS but blew it off "kids never code here" No. Kids don't arrest here. They code here several times a year!
  6. by   vamedic4
    MissJoRN speaks the truth...and I can vouch for my floor..peds cardiology. What MOST of my coworkers don't understand is that "THIS IS WHERE KIDS GO TO DIE". "IF THEY DIE, IT'S GONNA BE HERE, ON OUR SHIFT, ON OUR FLOOR". And it's not just the "sick" one's. Just about 8 hours ago we coded a 14 year old asthma teen who's sats dropped from 96 on room air to the mid 70s....bronchospasm/constriction. Pediatric codes are respiratory in origin more than 60% of the time in my experience...probably more than that (but my experience is a little skewed, cuz babies with heart defects are pretty prone to code experiences).
    PALS IS a must for working in the hospital, and if you're really interested, try the PPPC...that's the PALS prehospital equivalent-focusing on "prehospital care of critical children", not necessary for nurses but EXCELLENT information and skills nonetheless.

    Just make sure your assessment skills are up to par. Assessment is EVERYTHING!!!

    the more you learn, the more you need to know
    vamedic4
    going to bed now.




    Quote from MissJoRN
    I strongly encourage nurses to take PALS asap (PALS is the "peds version" of ACLS) I think PALS has a strong emphasis and early recognition/ intervention/ prevention that is so important! Also in peds it's good to redefine the word "code" as you're used to with adults or school. Rapid response teams aside, traditionally you didn't call a code in the adult world until arrest actually occurred. In peds you typically really see them coming and call (a good) code team to "code" your kid during distress. You actually start CPR for ineffective breathing not absent breathing.

    I said "good code team" since I actually worked in a hospital that was very adult based and the RTs and residents were so uncomfortable with peds that 2 peds nurses or even a lone peds nurse and well trained aide handled resp distress far better than the official code team. if I heard "why did you call? that baby's fine. Look his sats are 94%!" one more time I might have killed someone. Adult based people can get so hung up on those sats that they miss the retractions, tachypnea, and decreased breath sounds! Then we were arguing whether to act instead of acting. Our residents (but not RTs!) had to take PALS but blew it off "kids never code here" No. Kids don't arrest here. They code here several times a year!
  7. by   luv2yoga
    Wow - you all are full of information. Thanks.
    Meredith
  8. by   PedsER-RN
    Quote from mereditht
    what certifications are required as a peds floor nurse and as a peds er nurse? specifically, pals and acls (or the ped version of those).

    also, can you get those while you're still in school or do you have to be a working rn?

    thanks!
    our peds er requires: bls, pals, acls, tncc, and enpc. i think the floor just requires bls and pals.

    not sure about your 2nd question....sorry!
  9. by   navynurse06
    Also, if you have cancer pts on your floor in order to give chemo, you must be chemo cert.
    But where I work you have to have 6 month on the floor before taking the peds chemo course.
  10. by   GregCP, RN
    In the pediatric med surg floor i work in, they require me to take PALS, Chemo, BLS, and if you do nights- Charge nurse.

close