Reasons for Flu Vaccine Reluctancy - page 5

by Kimberly111-13

11,046 Views | 51 Comments

Hello, Iím a pre-nursing student who has a few questions about influenza vaccination for a class assignment. What are the reasons for reluctancy of receiving the influenza vaccination by nurses and nurse assistants? ... Read More


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    Quote from grannyrn65
    Everyone has the right to refuse to get vaccinations. But the rest of us have the right to be protected from those that refuse. If it means isolating you or restricting your ability to work, that goes with your exercising your 'right'. Every vaccination and drug has side effects. But I would hate to go back to the days when the only thing available was the smallpox vaccination. Given the ease that one can travel, one can spread disease much easier.

    For those that refuse various vaccinations, for themselves or their children, I pray you donot get any of these illness. And if you do, I pray that I don't come in contact with you, I don't want to take the chance of getting sick. I suffer from several chronic disease and am quite careful about exposures. I even call to check before going to visit them. This granny doesn't take chances

    GrannyRN65
    So do you not take care of patients without them having the flu vaccine?

    I've never had the yearly flu vaccine and don't plan on getting it...so bc I don't want it I should loose my right to make a living the way a choose?

    Why is it flu vaccine or die for some people? The flu vaccine contains the predicted most common strains for the year so one can get a strain that isn't covered by the yearly vaccine...so I must take this vaccine that is a gestimate of helpfulness every year while taking care of patients who may not have gotten theirs and work side by side other employees who are mandated to get the shot either? What you say sounds good but it's not realistic in my opinion...but hey to each his own...
  2. 1
    Quote from NightNurse876
    So do you not take care of patients without them having the flu vaccine?
    "My patient didn't get vaccinated, so why should I". Certainly there are patients that may have not been vaccinated before the accident or illness. But that is no excuse for a trained HCW to refuse a vaccination required by the employer. Everyone should get an annual flu vaccination.

    Quote from NightNurse876
    I've never had the yearly flu vaccine and don't plan on getting it...so bc I don't want it I should loose my right to make a living the way a choose?
    I've always understood the primary reason for a HCW to get a vaccination is to minimize the spread of a disease among the sick or compromised patients with whom you work, as well as protecting you from a serious infection yourself.

    You are always free to infect yourself with what ever you want, but why take it out on your patients and co-workers and possibly infect them? By virtue of choosing the nursing profession, you have chosen to work in a setting where you come in contact with a lot of different people everyday. The employer requirement of influenza vaccination is designed to not only protect you but everyone around you that you come in contact with everyday in the workplace.

    I think you might be happier making a living in a work setting where you don't interact with too many people and where you employer will not require vaccinations. Two such jobs that come to mind are keypunch operator and typewriter repair person.
    CuriousMe likes this.
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    How many people in hospital aquire the flu from being in the hospital around other people who have the flu? any numbers?

    It's my understanding that the common cold is more communicable in hospital than the flu. Seriously, how many people who are in for a surgical procedure die from getting the flu from their caregiver? (and you can't tell me that every nurse gets a flu shot).

    Just asking for some proofs to go with the best practices being thrown around.
    citylights89 likes this.
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    Quote from laidback al
    "my patient didn't get vaccinated, so why should i". certainly there are patients that may have not been vaccinated before the accident or illness. but that is no excuse for a trained hcw to refuse a vaccination required by the employer. everyone should get an annual flu vaccination.

    there are other options than getting the vaccine. i will wear a mask at work...you feel everyone should get a flu vaccine thats fine, but you can not force someone to period. and it's not an excuse. as it says in my post other hospital employees that come in contact with patients and nurses are not required. also i think i would consider the flu vaccine if it came that way at my hospital without the h1n1 mixed in it...but that's another subject. if the maker of a vaccine will not take it or give it to there children, i don't want it, period!


    i've always understood the primary reason for a hcw to get a vaccination is to minimize the spread of a disease among the sick or compromised patients with whom you work, as well as protecting you from a serious infection yourself.

    you are always free to infect yourself with what ever you want, but why take it out on your patients and co-workers and possibly infect them? by virtue of choosing the nursing profession, you have chosen to work in a setting where you come in contact with a lot of different people everyday. the employer requirement of influenza vaccination is designed to not only protect you but everyone around you that you come in contact with everyday in the workplace.

    well thank goodness for sick days. if i get sick i'm not allowed to go to work. also since this vaccine thing doesn't protect you 100% you can still get sick....nice how you left that part out when picking apart my post.


    i think you might be happier making a living in a work setting where you don't interact with too many people and where you employer will not require vaccinations. two such jobs that come to mind are keypunch operator and typewriter repair person.
    really? does the person at the restaurant you go to making your food have the shot? the cashier the gives you your reciept at the mall? everyone doesnt get the flu vaccine yearly, deal with it. please dont reply to this quote that working in the hospital is different and as a hcp blah blah, you've already stated that but in the end those people come in contact with more people and do people that ride the bus or train...guess you cant get on with ur annual!!

    i know many nurses who work at hospitals that do not require a flu shot and they dont get any sicker than anyone else. you can talk all the crap you want about who should and who shouldn't. in all my time stepping for into a hospital for 2 to 3 days a week, not requiring a flu shot and not having one, i haven't been sick or gotten anyone sick. people like you should all but put in one town so you can mandate what people have to do in your own box. there are options and if i dont want to get it that doesn't mean i shouldn't be a nurse. i guess one would rather have a fully vaccinated idiot taking care of them...i wouldn't. my hospital has mandatory shots and the waiver will be signed and the mask will be worn everyday i go to work, the end.

    and the mandated vaccine was started bc they realized nurses didn't want to get it...so they began to force it...
    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Oct 29, '10 : Reason: Personal attack
    Anne36 likes this.
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    To respond to one poster's question, would I take care of a hospitalized flu patient? If I were still working, I would have had the flu vaccination, so I would have been protected. So yes, I would have no problem taking care of a flu patient. But, based on more then thirty-five years of experience the 'flu' patients admitted to my facility, were admitted because of complications from the flu, such as pneumonia, severe dehydration.

    In response to the 'mandated' vaccination, mandating or requiring vaccinations is not something new. I am sixty five years old. For the past sixty years, I have had to receive numerous mandated or required vaccinations. The ones I received as a child were mandated or required prior to living in Germany and Japan, by the U.S. Army. In the fifties, I and every other child received the Salk and then Sabin vaccinations for polio. I don't remember any parent refusing to vaccinate their children against polio or smallpox. The first mandated flu vaccination I ever received was as an employee of the New York State Department of Health and it was for the swine flu. Since I liked my job,I got the vaccination.

    I can respect a person's refusal to get a vaccination if it is based on a religious belief. But when nurses, who have been educated to follow the science, offering personal beliefs or poorly constructed scientific proof as their reason or a fear of government requiring more and more, as a reason, I think someone needs a refresher course or two. Or perhaps you need a job in an area of nursing that doesn't require patient interaction. You will be protected and so will the rest of the world. I am not trying to insult anyone,just making on a valid suggestion, for all of our protection.

    I do have a question. For those who do not want the flu vaccination, do you religiously follow universal precautions? Do you wash your hands prior to or upon entering a patient's room and after taking vital signs or a tratment or medication or giving a bath, or assisting a patient in a transfer or assisting another employee with a patient? If my own hospitalizations hold true, I was surprised at the number of physicians, house staff, nurses, transportation people, P.T., respiratory therapists, that frequently fail to do this simple preventive task. I have asthma, which has resulted in numerous hospitalizations and now have a reputation as the 'retired nurse'who requires everyone to wash their hands upon entering her room. So what I'd rather have the reputation then pick up someone elses free traveling germ.

    GrannyRN65
    CuriousMe likes this.
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    Granny,
    In your 65 years how long has it been mandatory to get the flu vaccine?
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    Quote from NightNurse876
    Granny,
    In your 65 years how long has it been mandatory to get the flu vaccine?
    Thirty three years. I remember standing in line, in Tower One,with Dr. Warren Toff, Deputy Commissioner, and my boss. He felt since it was mandated,he was included. I don't think my employers, in Florida, mandated it but I do recall it being offered for free, to those that wanted one.

    GrannyRN65
    CuriousMe likes this.
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    Quote from grannyrn65
    Thirty three years. I remember standing in line, in Tower One,with Dr. Warren Toff, Deputy Commissioner, and my boss. He felt since it was mandated,he was included. I don't think my employers, in Florida, mandated it but I do recall it being offered for free, to those that wanted one.

    GrannyRN65
    I guess my concern lies in the H1N1 vaccine I know some ppl and have heard a few horror stories of reactions...I myself was given a bad batch of ppd for a skin test once so now I get chest x-rays bc it was unclear if my reaction was from exposure or the batch...And as much scientific evidence as there is to back up this topic you can find more against it. I guess that's part of my motivation to get into research in the coming years, so I can really have a true understanding of these things. Call me stubborn but I don't like to be forced to do something when I'm unsure of it...
  9. 0
    To NightNurse876, I apologize if you found my-tongue-in-cheek humor insulting.

    grannyrn65 says it so much more diplomatically than I can.

    I can respect a person's refusal to get a vaccination if it is based on a religious belief. But when nurses, who have been educated to follow the science, offering personal beliefs or poorly constructed scientific proof as their reason or a fear of government requiring more and more, as a reason, I think someone needs a refresher course or two. Or perhaps you need a job in an area of nursing that doesn't require patient interaction. You will be protected and so will the rest of the world. I am not trying to insult anyone, just making on a valid suggestion, for all of our protection.
  10. 0
    Quote from NightNurse876
    I guess my concern lies in the H1N1 vaccine I know some ppl and have heard a few horror stories of reactions...I myself was given a bad batch of ppd for a skin test once so now I get chest x-rays bc it was unclear if my reaction was from exposure or the batch...And as much scientific evidence as there is to back up this topic you can find more against it. I guess that's part of my motivation to get into research in the coming years, so I can really have a true understanding of these things. Call me stubborn but I don't like to be forced to do something when I'm unsure of it...
    I can understand your fear of the H1N5 vaccination. The strain of flu that it protected from was a new strain. Because it was a new strain, because no one had any resistance to this strain, I would think, that as a nurse, I would have been more fearful of getting that strain. In some respects, I agree with the statement that more research, on possible long term effects, is warrented but that should not be a reason for not getting the vaccination.

    Your reaction to the PPD test, it is unlikely that you were given a bad batch. If you had been, the entity providing the test, would have received numerous complaints. I really do not know what caused your negative reaction. I received the BCG vaccination my first year in nursing school. Several years later I had a PPD, which I reacted badly to. For years I had chest x-rays in place of the PPD. I know what caused my negative reaction.

    I am not sure what you mean by wanting to go into research. Research nurses, who work in various drug studies,have to follow a strict scientific process. Nurses who conduct nursing research also follow the same strict scientific process. Nurses who do bedside research (I did) have to follow strict guidelines. The research conducted,in such units, is generally based on equipment,procedures, medication, treatments.

    I have gone to other boards where posters saying they are nurses, post opinions about the negative effects of vaccinations. When asked to furnish proof, they generally cite a study published in the Lancet. The problem with his 'research' is that it was poorly constructed. It was so poorly constructed and his method of research unorthodox, that his British license is under investigation. He is presently located in Texas. He is not a license physician here and his research clinic is under investigation here.
    If one wants to cite research, please make sure that it is valid research, that can be duplicated and results published in peer review journals. Citing other peoples reactions to something has never been considered valid research. Or even one's own personal experience is not valid whn it is based on guess at it's cause. I didn't blame my reaction on a bad batch of PPD. My doctor questioned me, after a negative chest x-ray, my past history. It as only then that I recalled my BCG vaccination-the real cause.
    For those that don't know wat BCG is, it was a vaccination that was give tohealth care workers to provide protection against TB. It was discontinued back in the late 60's. although, I understand, is still given in Europe.

    GrannyRN65


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