Would working in a small plastic surgery office be easy?

  1. 0
    I am thinking of working in a small plastic surgery center. I am thinking it would be better than working in a hospital's operating room for these reasons....

    1. The patients are healthy which makes the cases less stressful.
    2. The patients are healthy which makes it very unlikely that they have hepatitis or HIV.
    3. You work with only a couple surgeons so they get along with you great.
    4. You work with only a couple surgeons so you will eventually completely memorize their preferences.
    4. There are less supplies to deal with so you will never have a hard time finding something.

    Would you agree with these points?
    Last edit by linda2097 on Feb 2, '08
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  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Plastics patients (not all)can be very vain and overly fussy, which can make them difficult if they don't get "perfect" results.

    Even healthy seeming people can have Hep, HIV and a host other nasties. It's no guarantee.

    Working with one or two Docs could be terrific if you like them, but hell if you don't.

    Just check it out very carefully before you commit...
    On the plus side, there are very few emergency facelifts, so there's probably no call
  6. 0
    I'd be nervous because if something does go wrong, your team is it and you're not going to have all those resources at hand while you're waiting for transport to a hospital.

    Otherwise, I'd think it's got to be easier in many ways than a regular OR. I don't think that the percentage of fussy patients would be much higher than anywhere else, since almost every patient I've ever met expects perfection these days.
  7. 2
    I began school to become an RN last fall, with the intent of working in the field of plastic surgery. I find a lot stigma, misconception, and the need to defend my choice of specialty. For that reason, I'm currently writing a research paper for school entitled, "Plastic Please: Why Registered Nurses Should Choose Plastic Surgery Over Hospital Work". I want to be as well-informed about my choice as possible.
    Being a licensed esthetician, I love the beauty industry and skin care. However, having a background in physician contracting and credentialing, I've dealt a lot with professional liability insurance, malpractice claims, licensure, etc. Because of this, I feel that the beauty industry at the cosmetology level is not "careful" or procedural enough - that the health and safety of the public is at great risk. Initially I wanted to work in a medi-spa, but realized that nursing was probably a much better fit.
    I love that in the field of nursing the ability to specialize and the opportunity and need for continuing education is limitless. But, I am accustomed to office work, office hours, and benefits. Nursing burnout seems to stem from long shifts, understaffing, constant exposure to contagious disease, depressing enviornment, etc. Working in a private plastic surgery practice seems to curtail a lot of the negatives of nursing. I love helping people and making them feel beautiful - it's not just an outer appearance vanity, but their self-esteem, and general sense of well-being and happiness.
    Minney and jahra like this.
  8. 0
    All except #3 and possibly #2.
    There is a lot more drama in a small office. And I'm guessing that because it's plastics the women in the office may be more catty than usual. I've worked in a small office that did foot surgeries. It's a fine line between being social, and removing yourself from the drama. It's very difficult to get along with everyone and you can't avoid them in a small office.
    The surgical side is always easier. I think we had 2 suture choices as compared to the 100 or more suture choices at the hospital.
  9. 0
    "esthegirl23;I began school to become an RN last fall, with the intent of working in the field of plastic surgery. I find a lot stigma, misconception, and the need to defend my choice of specialty. For that reason, I'm currently writing a research paper for school entitled, "Plastic Please: Why Registered Nurses Should Choose Plastic Surgery Over Hospital Work".

    That is great that you found a good match at a Plastic Surgery office.

    I am an RN and Aesthetician trained in Medical Aesthetics. I was very
    disappointed in interviewing years ago with PS. The first team interview
    I had the team was more interested in how many aesthetic clients I could
    bring in, how many dollars, how could I increase that by referring for
    PS consults, how could I suggest add on surgical or aesthetic procedures.
    Medicine is now a business, and allows has been, but there appeared to
    be no soul or conscience in this group and dollar signs appeared to
    be first and foremost. My sense was that a procedure would be done
    whether you needed it or not if you could afford it.

    Needless to say I was out the door in a flash.....

    If you have found a good practice, enjoy the environment it seems like
    a wonderful specialty to work in when you find the right group.
  10. 0
    You must have a VERY high tolerance for drama. Being very manipulative is a plus-that is how nurses succeed in this industry (and many small facilities, not just plastics).

    I've done plastics for years, and am getting out. Looking to do exclusively neurosurgery. Much less stressful.


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