Two people in recovery? Can't read an EKG monitor... - page 2

Hi everyone... For those of you that work PACU, perhaps you can be of assistance to me....I work at a small hospital in Florida in Labor and Delivery. We do our own C/Sections and recover... Read More

  1. by   shudokan-RN
    I agree, with all above posts.
    this might help though (light humor)
    bad rhythm VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
    really bad rhythm -----------------------------------------

    fortunately I have had the opportunity to take both basic rhythm class and acls.

    I still carry my rhythm flash cards with me, when doing local sedation, or when I'm the #2 RN in recovery on call back
    Marci
    Last edit by shudokan-RN on Mar 21, '04 : Reason: spell check
  2. by   schmatah
    Quote from southRNflchick
    Hi everyone...

    For those of you that work PACU, perhaps you can be of assistance to me....I work at a small hospital in Florida in Labor and Delivery. We do our own C/Sections and recover patients in our own PACU. Here's my question: our nurse manager is well aware of the fact that: A. There is only ONE person in recovery (even though I truly belive there is a state law in Florida that TWO people must be present in recovery due to a case that took place about 7 years ago where a male nurse was molesting patients that were incoherent) and B. most of the nurses recovering these patients (myself included) do NOT have ACLS nor do we have even a basic EKG training under our belts...in other words, we were told (and I QUOTE) "just put "yes" in the box that asks for the cardiac monitor dx" (as in, yes, they're on a monitor, but I have no *******' idea what it says!) I am very nervous about this whole situation....and feel as though my manager is just trying to save a few bucks to make the budget look better (by not staffing the recovery room and not properly training the staff) when in the long run, I could be in jeapordy of losing my license, couldn't I??? I even asked my manager if she would "allow" me to take off a few Fridays so I could attend the one and only EKG course offered at my hospital and she told me no!! I sure don't want MY family having a baby where I work!!
    Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
    :uhoh21:
    whoooah,
    I work in PACU in FL. All staff are ACLS and PALS certified. We have at least 2 RNs at all times in PACU. If a patient is unconcious or has an airway in place, we 1:1 them until they can manage their airway. We 1:1 all icu patients. The RN stays at the bedside. Our anesthesiologists are available at all times. They have one in charge so he is free to troubleshoot any issues. We just hail them by walkie talkie and they come in seconds. We are abusy unit, averaging 400 cases a month. Our manager demands a high standard. She does not tolerate anything less than excellent service management to patients visitors and doctors (even the asses!)I work hard but go home feeling like I have done a good days work.It is possible.
  3. by   schmatah
    :hatparty: The best thing about being on call in PACU is that I am sitting at home typing messages and getting paid for it!
  4. by   sharann
    Quote from schmatah
    :hatparty: The best thing about being on call in PACU is that I am sitting at home typing messages and getting paid for it!
    But how much? Not enough for the inconvinience of not being able to make plans to be more than 30 min away from work :uhoh21: Also, just love being woken up at all hours for an "emergency" D&C (pt has one spot of old blood on peripad, grrrrr :angryfire

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