Sinclair LPN to RN or ADN question

  1. 0
    I'm interested in opinions regarding whether an LPN may fare better going into Sinclair's LPN to RN bridge program or just adding the extra quarter and taking the ADN program. I had intended on going the bridge route, but recently a coworker told me that she's in the ADN program b/c a lot of people fail out of the bridge program and end up doing the regular RN program. Has anyone heard opinions on this topic? Thanks!

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 6 Comments...

  3. 1
    Hi MGM,

    I am in Sinclair's LPN-RN bridge program right now so I thought I'd give you a few thoughts on it...

    If you bridge, you go directly into NSG 132-133 which is the state mandated transition class. It is 1 quarter for these two classes. If you bridge, you essentially skip NSG 121, 122, 123, 124 I think so it looks like you are saving 2 quarters.

    The last I heard, it was nearly a 3 year wait to get into the regular nursing program at Sinclair and that is after you get all the pre-reqs done and get on the list. Though they say there's no real list for the bridge, there really is. I already had a degree but still needed a few classes to qualify for this unofficial list. I got those done in 2 quarters ( going part time). I still had a few classes that I needed to take which took up another 2 quarters (part time). I lucked into the bridge program just in time. Essentially, it took me 4 quarters to get in.

    I don't know that any more people fail out of the bridge program than do those who go the traditional way. Of the 9 that I started with in my bridge class, 7 of us remain. One didn't make it. The other would have but had to hold off school for other reasons. Is it tough? Yes, it is much harder than PN school. Is it doable? Certainly.

    I don't think it would be any harder bridging than going the regular route. You do miss out on some things skills wise but they're not hard to catch up on. Sinclair has one of the best ADN programs around with a really high first time NCLEX pass rate. The program overall is tough but that is as it should be. There are instructors that people tend to avoid but I have no complaints about the ones I've had thus far. I am seeing the end of the tunnel now and have only one class quarter and the preceptorship quarter left.

    NSG 220 for most people seems to be the hardest class and you have to take it regardless of whether you go through the traditional way or bridge. After 220, you do 2 classes per quarter (4 hrs each) and they are each 5.5 weeks. For instance, last quarter I did cardiopulmonary the first half of the quarter and psych the second half. This quarter I had neuro/ortho/uro the first half and now I'm in OBGYN/L&D. It's a lot of information in a short time but even being a much older student than most of my classmates, it's certainly doable.

    In addition, Sinclair's tuition is really low compared to any other school around. I don't live in Montgomery County so my tuition is about double but it is still less than $100 an hour! Let's see, a fantastic nursing program at an affordable price (especially considering I have to pay it all out of pocket).

    I would suggest trying to get all non core nursing classes out of the way before getting into the program if possible. It will make life more bearable in the program. This is especially true for classes like Human Physiology (if you bridge you take this instead of repeating all the A&P classes) and Pharmacology. You will hear horror stories about the pharm instructor but go in with an open mind. If you do your work before class and study, you'll be fine. It is hard but you will learn a lot from him and he's not as bad as people say.... actually, I liked him.

    Good luck whatever you decide to do!!!!
    mjm1979 likes this.
  4. 0
    Thank you Beccah. I really appreciate your taking the time to give me a detailed answer.

    I'm not sure at this point if I will continue my education for several reasons, but I may. I just graduated in Aug and need a break from schooling. I went to MVCTC and their program is very intense. I dread going back to school after going through that.

    Do you think if I take the pre- and co-reqs slowly, like a class a quarter, that by the time I get into the program that the knowledge will be too stale or do you think it's better to take these classes closer to taking the actual nursing classes. I'm talking about Psych, Micro, Physiology and Pharm. I don't need to take the Englishes or humanities b/c I have an assoc. degree in sociology. I'll have to take the communications class and I guess the nursing math.

    Here are a couple of important questions for me personally: When you get into the core program, which quarter do clinicals start? And how many days/nights a week are you in school/clinicals?

    I hated clinicals! I love my job but I guess it was just getting up practically every Saturday for 1 1/2 years at 3 - 5 am and going to an eight hour clinical and not getting paid for it... so I dread clinicals.

    I heard you're in the classroom three days a week and in clinicals two days a week... The good thing is that I'd get off a few weeks between clinicals and get the summer off. I was in the two year part-time program and it was year round. So for two years I went to school/clinicals three 8-hour days a week. We'd go 3 - 3 1/2 months and then get a one or two week break. So maybe getting to take a breather in the summer will help. Thanks again SO much for taking the time to respond!!
  5. 0
    Hello! I was just searching for Sinclair posts, and happened upon yours. I am a current nursing student going into 220 in the fall. I know it's a little late, but I thought I might be able to answer some of your questions. I would most definitely get Micro and Pharm out of the way early, and save A&P classes for closer to your acceptance into the program.

    Clinicals begin in 122/123, which is the second "real" nursing quarter. You will be in the clinical setting three days a week, usually about 4 hours a day, and then have two days of lecture for two hours. The schedule is pretty standard (M&F lecture 8-9:50am and clinicals T-W-Th 7:30am-12pm) unless you are taking the evening section.



    Oh, and for the LPN to RN transition program at Sinclair you unfortunately only get to skip one quarter.

    I hope this isn't too late to help!
  6. 0
    Thanks for all responses, and no it isn't too late. If I go back I probably won't even be taking a general class until early next year anyway... I deeply appreciate all comments. I'm an older student and I think if I go back that I'll probably do it within the next year b/c for me times awastin'! I didn't work going thru the PN program but will have to work at least part-time if I go on and I'm old and tired and my memory ain't what it used to be!! So, I'm just trying to gather info to make my decision as to if I'll continue with my education. Thanks again!
  7. 0
    Quote from clewis08(student)
    Hello! I was just searching for Sinclair posts, and happened upon yours. I am a current nursing student going into 220 in the fall. I know it's a little late, but I thought I might be able to answer some of your questions. I would most definitely get Micro and Pharm out of the way early, and save A&P classes for closer to your acceptance into the program.

    Clinicals begin in 122/123, which is the second "real" nursing quarter. You will be in the clinical setting three days a week, usually about 4 hours a day, and then have two days of lecture for two hours. The schedule is pretty standard (M&F lecture 8-9:50am and clinicals T-W-Th 7:30am-12pm) unless you are taking the evening section.



    Oh, and for the LPN to RN transition program at Sinclair you unfortunately only get to skip one quarter.

    I hope this isn't too late to help!

    Hi I was just wondering how long it took you to get into the RN program at sinclair. I just moved back and have most of my prereqs done. They told me the wait is 1-2 years depending on your grades...does that sound accurate? I really want to go there because it is a good program and much cheaper. Thanks for your time.
  8. 0
    It took me two years (actually 9 quarters) from the time I took my PaxRN to get into the program. As far as I know, grades don't have anything to do with it. You do have to maintain a 2.0 to be in the program, but even if you carry a 4.0 you aren't going to get in any quicker. It really is a great program, and I think it was worth the wait.
    Oh, and the grading scale does change for any nursing class. You have to have an 80% to pass.
    80-85%=C
    86-92%=B
    93-100%=A


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top