Non-Female Midwives

  1. I am a male LVN that is leaning towards Midwifery. Any thoughts?
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   scoutgirl17
    Good luck. I remember in nursing school we had a male student. He was fine in the nursery, but the patients did not want him to check them post-partum, and absolutely refused to have him in their room during labor. Also where I work the nurses do the vag exams during labor and I dont think a male nurse would go over too well. That poor male student ended up very proficient in newborn care.
  4. by   dswalker
    I encourage you to consider nurse-midwifery. You would need to become an RN and then from there may enroll in either a certificate or graduate level program. Many programs require at least a year's experience as an RN before starting the nurse-midwifery clinical courses.

    Men are definitely in the minority in nurse-midwifery, even proportionately greater than in nursing in general, I would guess. I worked with a male CNM who was very well thought of by patients, nurses and other midwives. I believe he had no more patients refuse his care than did a male OB physician. Male OBs are accepted readily but male nurse-midwives are met with more skepticism and this may be related to the history of both midwifery and nursing. To be honest, there is some prejudice toward male nurse-midwives and probably those who view them most negatively are not the patients, but other nurses. We had a male student graduate from our nurse-midwifery program several years ago and we have not had more male students because we do not get many male applicants. I encourage you to talk with several male nurse-midwives if you are seriously interested, as they can give you the best perspective. If you would like the names of two to contact, let me know.
  5. by   jamistlc
    Originally posted by dswalker:
    <STRONG>I encourage you to consider nurse-midwifery. You would need to become an RN and then from there may enroll in either a certificate or graduate level program. Many programs require at least a year's experience as an RN before starting the nurse-midwifery clinical courses.

    Men are definitely in the minority in nurse-midwifery, even proportionately greater than in nursing in general, I would guess. I worked with a male CNM who was very well thought of by patients, nurses and other midwives. I believe he had no more patients refuse his care than did a male OB physician. Male OBs are accepted readily but male nurse-midwives are met with more skepticism and this may be related to the history of both midwifery and nursing. To be honest, there is some prejudice toward male nurse-midwives and probably those who view them most negatively are not the patients, but other nurses. We had a male student graduate from our nurse-midwifery program several years ago and we have not had more male students because we do not get many male applicants. I encourage you to talk with several male nurse-midwives if you are seriously interested, as they can give you the best perspective. If you would like the names of two to contact, let me know.</STRONG>
    I too am a Male LPN who has a calling to be in the birthing room! I have an other thought though I am thinking of the D.E.M. route which does not require the RN credential just the willingness and some medical training. It is usually a program where you do both classroom coursework and apprenticeship training! I am seriously considering "The Iowa School of Traditional Midwifery". Anyone need a nurse there in Iowa? He, He!

    I have been a LPN for 11 years and I can tell ya that as a LPN and male their many who will look down upon your skills and abilities do not get discouraged! "Males in Nursing" is an other place to get support and encouragement, they have several members who are Midwifes and MALE! Although I do not advocate joining the Org as it is a sister/Sub Group of the ANA, who doesn't acknowledge LPN's as Nurses! I might suggest you join groups who are practitioners in the field and/or start as a Birth Doula while going to school (again the opposition is not so much the clients as the women who are practicing as a Doula), but it is a good way to get your feet wet and until you graduate as a Midwife! There is a group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DoulaNurse which has a weekly discussion on Sundays for birthing room practitioners!
    It is at 7 PM ESt (Daylight Savings Time, now) and I moderate the group, You are welcome there!

    Peace,
    Have a Blessed Day,
    Jami

    This is a nickname, too many "James" in the family, also it is more Unisexed


    [ April 29, 2001: Message edited by: jamistlc ]
  6. by   kennedyj
    Hi,
    I am a male OB nurse who is attending graduate school to be a nurse midwife. My Ob clinicals instructor (a midwife who later part time precepted me in an ob externship)Introduced me to it. I started out wanting to do trauma like most other's male nurses especially being in the Military. Trauma is great but I later found myself to have a higher interest in midwifery although the name itself is hard to get used to. I like Ob/gyn nurse practitioner better. Although they have a smaller labor and delivery scope. I am married and have a duaghter. I am 1/3 of the way through the program. From working in an a high risk referral center experience has been great. I found out there is so much more than what I expected to learn in this field. I get along great with all my patients and have never had anyone feel uncomfortable that I know of. I like to talk and get to know each person. I think it depends on your character and the way you present yourself. You will have great oppertunities to work with families, get to know them (in the 20 min clinical visits- lol), any answer questions (great patient teaching) helping them meet their needs and understanding. This is usually a positive exciting event and you get to be a part of it. Helping it to be an even better event for the family as well as serving in a health provider role.
    good luck,
    Jared
  7. by   jamistlc
    Greetings,

    i would like to clarify from my past post the chat on Sunday has been deleted from our groups schedule and has ceased. I would however suggest that you become active in your community by joining local associations and colalitions. I would also say join our club for Midwifes and Doulas to get actively involved as an advocate and to learn as much as you can prior to getting formally enrolled in a program. It is also a good way to make contacts (network) as a male you need to make these contacts for future reference!
  8. by   jamistlc
    Greetings All Nurses,


    I would like to direct you to this URL http://www.uky.edu/ArtsSciences/Clas...dicine375.html

    Please note we are fighting against a long estblished social norm, as such ANY MALE who desires to work "WITH WOMEN" during childbirth is a CHANGE AGENT! This implies we must remember who and what we do will be scrutinized by eveyone concerned more so than if we were female. I am doing research for a paper to be published and I thought this page really set the tone for what we are up against as childbirth providers, whether we desire to go the CNM or DEM route. And for me I am working against the Medical establishment as well, I desire to do Homebirth/Waterbirths! Best of luck and do not give up we need all the support we can muster!
  9. by   ruffhouser
    If this type of nursing "sings" to you, go for it. Follow your passion. You'll be terrific! Take care and God Bless!
  10. by   mark_LD_RN
    hi all i am a male L&D nurse I am currently working on becoming a CNM. my patients love me and request me on return visits. I encourage you to purse your dreams,i know 4 other male nurse midwives and their patients really love them also. i already have a 2 job offers for when i become a cnm.
    as far as scoutgirl17's post about male student in her class, i think theur must have been a problem with the way he presented himself or that others introduce him. I have found some women to be hesitant about having a male nurse if they are introduced as a male nurse or if they introduce their seld as such. I refuse to let others intoduce me even when i was in school. I just go in to patients room politely introduce myself as mark and say i am your nurse for today is that ok, NEVER had a patient or family refuse my care. i have recieved many cards gifts and letters from my patients. the current hospital i work at posts all of our exit surveys that comeback from patients with a nurses name on it up on the wall by nurses station. Ihave so many up their in the last 3 months that it has been jokingly called marks worship wall.
    so just do what you like treat your patients as friends and with respect and you will be fine. if i can be of any help you can email me at mark_LD_RN@hotmail.com.
  11. by   alansmith52
    I have myself been a victim of L & D nurse predjudice. when I was a student I never saw even one delivery. directly due to the fact that the Labor nurse was embarassed to have me there.
    I think this speaks volumes for the professionalism.
    incidently my highest nclex scores happen to be in womens health thanks to my wife who was an L&d nurse and had our first child around that time.
    I hope men become more accepted in womens health It is a joke that its not and unfortunantly it is nurses who stifle it. the same nurses by the way who plays folleys in males (or have).
  12. by   mother/babyRN
    Mid husbands?
  13. by   mother/babyRN
    That wasn't meant to be fresh...I think it would be great to have more men involved.....
  14. by   RN2B2005
    I'm still a nursing student, but I'm also a mother, so I'll give you my $0.02.

    Personally, I prefer female physicians. Our family doctor is a woman, as is my OB and our family dentist. The ARNP who does my routine GYN care is female, as well. It's partly personal preference (especially with the OB/GYN--the old mechanic/car adage) but also coincidence--the vast majority of family practise physicians in our area happen to be female.

    However, as far as the actual labour and delivery process goes, I found out fast that it doesn't matter what sex your OB is...he/she won't be there for most of the labour. Mine ended up being on vacation, and one of her partners (female) barely made it into the delivery room, even though the nurse was screaming into the phone that I was crowning and she'd better get here if she didn't want a nurse delivery (I was an unmedicated primipara, and the doc underestimated my desire to be done being pregnant). You probably know all about this, being a dad.

    I now believe that a CNM, male or female, would be a better choice than an absent female OB doctor. Certainly, the LDRP nurse who was with me through delivery could have been any sex at all as long as she kept the pudding cups coming and kept the poking and prodding to a minimum. Postpartum care was an embarassment-inducing time, and I doubt a male nurse would have made it much worse.

    As Mark said, it's all about your presentation of yourself. Be confident and professional, and I'd be surprised if your patients even give your sex a second thought. Good luck!

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