Clinical hours short of NMC suggestion? - page 9

by helricha

33,906 Views | 123 Comments

First of all, I really hope Silverdragon reads this and gives me insight. I have sent out my application as well as all of my paperwork to the NMC for my nursing license, except my training form. I was trained in the US at... Read More


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    Quote from migraineattack
    hi. thank you... i appreciate your reply. is it also possible to share your email address/fb account with me via pm since sending ang receiving messages here is limited. i would also like to work in uk, however, i don't think 25000aud will suffice everything-from visa
    costs, onp, show money, daily living expenses, etc. my other option is to work in australia and live there if given the chance. im in a third world country and i have 3 years experience in nursing. i am willing to work in rural or regional areas and i am not picky. i need work, more than that, i believe it would be a big break for my career to enter oz and get into a new system. needless to say, i respect the diversity of my clients regardless of their race, educational background, age, religion, etc. by the way, do you think the said amount be sufficient if i opt for ahpra registration and undergo the bp? luckily, there is an agency in pi which offers financial assistance to nurses, although i must admit the interest rate is one hefty amount. i hope you can update me with your progress in uk. so you finished the onp last april, how come your pin was that delayed?
    Hi, 25,000 Australian dollars will be plenty of money but if you meant 2,500 that wont cover much at all. Not even your flight if it is short notice.

    The registration process for both the UK and Australia is pretty similar and both frustrating and slow. You will have to take an english language test for both countries.

    Be very careful about using agents. There was a large group of nurses who came to my hospital a few years back. They had paid a large amount of money with the belief that they would have jobs. But none of them did and a few were even failed registration because their english was so bad or their paperwork was questionable. Some had to go back home because they couldn't afford to stay and look for work.

    Remember that working in the UK and Australia nurses have a more hands on role than they do in your country. Familes very rarely assist with care, like showers, feeding and dressing.

    If your not in a hurry I would suggest a few more years experience and try and specialise in a certain area. If you have a specialty it makes it much easier to find work.
  2. 0
    Quote from MuppetAus

    Hi, 25,000 Australian dollars will be plenty of money but if you meant 2,500 that wont cover much at all. Not even your flight if it is short notice.

    The registration process for both the UK and Australia is pretty similar and both frustrating and slow. You will have to take an english language test for both countries.

    Be very careful about using agents. There was a large group of nurses who came to my hospital a few years back. They had paid a large amount of money with the belief that they would have jobs. But none of them did and a few were even failed registration because their english was so bad or their paperwork was questionable. Some had to go back home because they couldn't afford to stay and look for work.

    Remember that working in the UK and Australia nurses have a more hands on role than they do in your country. Familes very rarely assist with care, like showers, feeding and dressing.

    If your not in a hurry I would suggest a few more years experience and try and specialise in a certain area. If you have a specialty it makes it much easier to find work.
    hi..yes i meant the former..it's 25000 aud..will it cover all expenses from onp, registration, etc? thanks for sharin your ideas and suggestion.. i found an agent tied up with a microfinancing company who is willing to loan as much as 25000aud to cover all the cost of registration in oz.. as to the ukrn process, how much should one need?thank you
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    A working holiday? Are you Australian? You really need to call the NMC to ask about the LPN thing and ask as I've been reading on this board for many years and haven't heard anything about folks going through from the LPN route. If I was to guess, they would say no and you should do an entire ADN plus BSN (theyd on't take kindly to online programs either from what I've read)...

    When you call them, you need to ask to speak to a decision officer because the people who answer the phones read off a piece of paper and don't know all the specifics. My first phone call, they told me I wouldn't be eligible period with my BSN, but I called again, talked to a decision officer who set me straight.

    If you really just want to see the UK, you can go over there for up to 6 months without a visa as an American.

    edit: sorry, this is to Sahara.
  4. 0
    Hi MuppetAus! Congrats! I hope you get your pin # soon from the NMC. I heard that it takes about 4-6 weeks? I was just curious, did you take the exam the third time your class met at Bournemouth? or did you guys meet up again on a different day to take the test?
  5. 1
    Quote from hilife_RN
    Hi MuppetAus! Congrats! I hope you get your pin # soon from the NMC. I heard that it takes about 4-6 weeks? I was just curious, did you take the exam the third time your class met at Bournemouth? or did you guys meet up again on a different day to take the test?
    Thanks
    My PIN has arrived and I have had my first day of orientation. I will post about my experiences when I'm a little more settled.

    The ONP - the third day is the exam day. You will also hand in your workbook. You will then come back later in the day to get your results and workbook back again, and a brief chat about the course.

    Migranehead ache it is hard for me to give you an idea of the costs involved because our exchange rates are different. It roughly cost me $4500 but I haven't sat down and worked it out exactly. This didn't include costs once I was in the UK. Such as food, trains and other stuff. I would be super careful taking on a loan there are lots of bad agents out there and you don't know until it is to late.
    hilife_RN likes this.
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    Yes, MuppetAus! Pls. do update us with your experiences. Wait, there is another fee we have to pay to get out PIN #? and how long did you have to wait for it? abt 4 wks?
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    I was lucky I only had to wait 3 weeks for my PIN but some have had to wait longer. The hospital I work for is happy to check electronic that I'm registered and then bring in the PIN card for offical view but some hospitals will not let people start until the nurse has the PIN card in their hand.

    I'm into my 5th week now. I'm working in the day chemo suite, so I'm not doing weekends and nights. They work a variety of 8hrs, 10hr and 12 hr shifts depending on the demand of the area. The 12 hr shifts aren't to bad. I find if I keep busy I feel better at the end of the day. It's when there is a quite moment that tiredness kicks in. If you work the 12hrs you get 1hr lunch break. Mostly because it is to difficult to have 2 30min breaks. I wear blue scrubs but the other nurses wear white shirts with blue piping around the collar and sleeve and blue scrub trousers. I wear scrubs because I'm agency (I don't know why).

    I have had a few moments where I have been unsure that I have made the right move over here. It's little things like familiar routines and procedures. For example where I came from we would use normal saline to flush between each unit of blood and have really frequent obs, but here there is no flushing not even when the bag is finished. It's not wrong just different to what I'm used too.
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    MuppetAus- how did you find it going being agency and new to the NHS?I am staff in the A&E- and although I am familiar with emergency care, I am glad I made the choice to start where I did- even terms are different to those in the US.You mentioned the uniforms. NHS staff nurses (?everywhere?) wear white tops with blue trim. Agencies wear similar colours/uniforms in my hospital.
  9. 0
    Quote from NoleNurse2000
    MuppetAus- how did you find it going being agency and new to the NHS?I am staff in the A&E- and although I am familiar with emergency care, I am glad I made the choice to start where I did- even terms are different to those in the US.You mentioned the uniforms. NHS staff nurses (?everywhere?) wear white tops with blue trim. Agencies wear similar colours/uniforms in my hospital.
    NoleNurse I don't mind being agency. I like that I'm not commited to anywhere. I feel like I have some control over where I am and what I'm doing, and I don't feel I get caught up in the politics of wards/areas.
    The NHS is pretty similar to the health system where I'm from. One big thing I have noticed is the lack of input and influence the unions have. In Australia you can't blink without unions being involved. Here lunch breaks get shortened and work hours extended and nothing ... no comment from the unions at all. I'm not a big fan of unions but I do think they have there place.

    My uniform is royal blue scrubs. The permenant nursing staff where the white tops with blue trim.
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    I've been told that because of the NMC code of conduct, nurses basically can't protest much. Like strikes are not allowed, for example (or risk losing your license). Additionally, you must report any wrongdoings (of course), but you also run the risk of being fired for doing so without much union repercussion. Our professor told of us of many stories while I was taking the ONP class...


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