Intake and Output problems - page 3

by EmilyEmily

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any recommendations on a site that offers practice problems on intake and output???... Read More


  1. 0
    It's every bit as absurd to say that 1 pint = 500 mL as it would be to say that pi = 3

    So now 1 gallon = 4 liters?
  2. 2
    precisely , which is why I want to know the name of the book! It should be trashed! ASAP!
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    It's every bit as absurd to say that 1 pint = 500 mL as it would be to say that pi = 3

    So now 1 gallon = 4 liters?
    GrnTea and Esme12 like this.
  3. 0
    Intake and output is not math, it's arithmetic. No matter what the liquid is, you add the number of cc that went in (Intake, I) and the number of cc that came out (Output, O). That's pretty much it.

    If they want to know what the balance is, that means that you lok at the difference between intake and output.

    If there was more intake than output, the patient is in positive fluid balance (positive here is not necessarily a good thing-- it means a positive number, greater than zero). Do the subtraction.

    If output was greater than intake, that's a negative fluid balance (negative is sometimes a very good thing indeed, if someone was fluid-overloaded in the first place and you want him to pee out more than he takes in). Do the subtraction.

    Does this make it clearer for you?
  4. 0
    Threads merged
  5. 0
    one kg obtained in a patient, it's one liter retained
  6. 0
    Quote from senay
    one kg obtained in a patient, it's one liter retained
    That's "retained," but otherwise you are correct. And that 1 kg = 2.2lbs.


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