I have an Ulcerative Colitis patient to care for tomorrow. Questions about diet? - page 3

So tomorrow, I'm assigned to care for a patient on the med/surg floor with an admitting diagnosis of "Ulcerative Colitis with Exacerbation". Simple enough, right? The patient's charts say their... Read More

  1. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Is this the same patient or a new one?
  2. Visit  delrepublica1776 profile page
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    same pt
  3. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    What is ulcerative colitis? Ulcerative Colitis - National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse
    What are the complications of ulcerative colitis? Ulcerative colitis - MayoClinic.com
    • Severe bleeding
    • A hole in the colon (perforated colon)
    • Severe dehydration
    • Liver disease (rare)
    • Kidney stones
    • Osteoporosis
    • Inflammation of skin, joints and eyes
    • An increased risk of colon cancer
    • A rapidly swelling colon (toxic megacolon)

    what meds are they on? what are the side effects of those meds? What are the effects of long term chronic disease on the psyche?
  4. Visit  Esme12 profile page
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    Coping
  5. Visit  Esme12 profile page
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    has had previous surgeries (cholecystectomy, ganglion cyst removal, tubal ligation, bladder sling).

    But HOW am I going to tie that stuff into the diagnosis's risk factors?

    And for the previous surgeries, how do I tell which ones could and couldn't affect her UC? Tubal is birth control. Bladder sling is from having babies. Gaglion cyst is on the wrist and the Gallbladder? incidental.

    What else do you know?
  6. Visit  delrepublica1776 profile page
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    Hmmmm. So when it says "Factors that DECREASE risk", what does that mean?

    Let me go out there and suppose our patient had HIV (purely made-up) instead of UC.

    The factors that INCREASE risk would be 'men who have sex with men', 'not using protection', 'also using drugs'. Factors that DECREASE risk would be 'using a condom', 'not sharing needles', etc.

    But how can there be factors that decrease the risk of UC exacerbation? I don't get it.
  7. Visit  Adri :) profile page
    1
    Quote from samianquazi
    Hmmmm. So when it says "Factors that DECREASE risk", what does that mean?

    Let me go out there and suppose our patient had HIV (purely made-up) instead of UC.

    The factors that INCREASE risk would be 'men who have sex with men', 'not using protection', 'also using drugs'. Factors that DECREASE risk would be 'using a condom', 'not sharing needles', etc.

    But how can there be factors that decrease the risk of UC exacerbation? I don't get it.
    Just to name a few:

    Following the appropriate diet, reducing stress, following prescribed medication regimens, keeping scheduled follow up appts with PCP,etc ....are ways to decrease the risks of a UC flair up.

    Think of it like this:
    What can cause a UC flair up? Not doing those things decreases your risks..

    Hope that helps you...
    KelRN215 likes this.
  8. Visit  Esme12 profile page
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    If you click on the links I provided to you......they will give you what you need.
  9. Visit  delrepublica1776 profile page
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    Okay, I looked through those links, and they did help a bit. Thanks for that.

    I now need some help for the labs. On my CDB sheet, it says this:

    "1) List abnormal and significant "Normal" lab values. Include pertinent changes over time.* 2) include possible rationale for these changes and 3) collaborative & nursing interventions for each change. Cite reference.
    * For example: If hemoglobin & hematocrit (H&H) have fluctuated over last week, explain why. If unsure, list possible reasons and give rationale. Include implications for nursing care of this client."

    So I'm looking over the lab values. The AST (84) and the ALT (180) are way way elevated, but I can't figure out why. Don't those two lab thingies have to do with the liver? But when I felt for this patient's liver, I couldn't feel it. What's up with that?
  10. Visit  FLmed profile page
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    Quote from samianquazi
    But what if they go to the toilet when I'm not in the room and void and then flush?
    You bring in a hat into the patient's room. Show the patient the hat and tell them that you will be putting this on the toilet. Tell them you want them to urinate in it because you want to measure their output. Also-- keep in mind that it's very common to see blood in the stool of somebody who has ulcerative colitis. You can ask your patient if they noticed this the last time they had a bowel movement.
  11. Visit  Beek74 profile page
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    I had UC until my ileostomy. Using the hat is so embarrassing for patients. But they're all correct, the patient should know what their trigger foods are.


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