Could you help me with this peds question?

  1. Hi...I have looked everywhere for the answer....and can't find it.

    Solution containers for toddlers should contain no more than

    50ml
    500ml
    100ml

    to prevent fluid overload..

    I can't find any info in any books.

    Help!
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   VickyRN
    Quote from HopefulRN2006
    Hi...I have looked everywhere for the answer....and can't find it.

    Solution containers for toddlers should contain no more than

    50ml
    500ml
    100ml

    to prevent fluid overload..

    I can't find any info in any books.

    Help!
    Are you referring to parenteral (IV) fluid limits? If so, I choose 100 ml. I can't give you any official version, just my own opinion, based on several years' experience doing clinicals on the pediatrics unit.

    As I'm sure you are aware, 1-3 yrs are the toddler years. Average weight in kgs: 10-15. 24 hour fluid resuscitation needs for infants and toddlers are generally calibrated according to this formula: 10 kg and below: 100 ml/kg; 10-20 kg: 1000 + 50 ml/kg; greater than 20 kg: 1500 + 20 ml/kg.

    Using this formula, the 24 hour fluid needs of the average toddler can range from 1000 ml to 1500 ml, or 42 ml - 62.5 ml/hr over a 24 hour period.

    In pediatric settings, buretrols and IV pumps are required in delivering IV fluids. The fluid limits should be strictly set at no more than twice the mls/hr. This is a fail-safe mechanism, in order to prevent fluid overload in the child. Therefore, the limit should be 84-135 ml. This is why I chose the option of 100 ml. Hope this helps
  4. by   HopefulRN2006
    THANK YOU Vicky!!

    Yes, it was on IV's.....I copied and pasted your great info on Word, so I can use it as a reference.

    Thanks a bunch!!!
    Last edit by HopefulRN2006 on Sep 29, '05
  5. by   VickyRN
    Quote from HopefulRN2006
    THANK YOU Vicky!!

    Yes, it was on IV's.....I copied and pasted your great info on Word, so I can use it as a reference.

    Thanks a bunch!!!
    Glad to be of assistance
  6. by   suzanne4
    If you are speaking of IV fluids, we always use 1000 ml bags, remember that all IVs for children are placed on pumps, and amount of fluids infused should be documented every one hour. The only time that smaller bags are used, are for specialty things, such as for drugs dealing with cardiac issues called inotropes, or insulin dripa, or something on that idea.

    This has been with both acute care units (regular peds floor) with routine maintenance IV fluids, as well as ICU for the specialty drips.
  7. by   VickyRN
    Quote from suzanne4
    If you are speaking of IV fluids, we always use 1000 ml bags, remember that all IVs for children are placed on pumps, and amount of fluids infused should be documented every one hour. The only time that smaller bags are used, are for specialty things, such as for drugs dealing with cardiac issues called inotropes, or insulin dripa, or something on that idea.

    This has been with both acute care units (regular peds floor) with routine maintenance IV fluids, as well as ICU for the specialty drips.
    That's why it is so important to use buretrols with younger pediatric patients... and, use the buretrols correctly (no more than 2 hrs' worth of fluid in buretrol, top of buretrol clamped "off," so can't receive any further fluids from IV bag). The nurse should set the pump to alarm just before the fluid in the buretrol chamber is due to run out, so he/she can re-fill the buretrol and re-set the volume limit for the next period of time. Also, IV site checks should be done every hour on peds patients

    http://www.accd.edu/sac/nursing/math/peds2.html
    http://www.accd.edu/sac/nursing/math/peds10.html

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