ADHD and nursing school please help - pg.2 | allnurses

ADHD and nursing school please help - page 2

So I am a first year student in nursing school and prior to Nursing School I was a solid A/B student. I have been successful in college completing core classes and prerequesites with out a hitch,... Read More

  1. Visit  ashleyisawesome profile page
    0
    my clinical instructor is a clinical psych mental health specialist, so she picked up that i had ADD right away. she asked me about it and i admitted that i used to take aderall, but its adverse effects outweigh the benefits for me and i prefer not to take medications..

    well ever since then, i feel as though i have become the joke of our clinical group. shes constantly making jokes about me and my ADD, and its embarassing... she even critiques my papers in front of the whole group and says things like "we can clearly see Ashley's ADD shining through here, she starts out great and then takes a sharp left turn and i dont know what shes talking about!" then everyone laughs.. except me..
  2. Visit  SheaTab profile page
    5
    Quote from ashleyisawesome
    my clinical instructor is a clinical psych mental health specialist, so she picked up that i had ADD right away. she asked me about it and i admitted that i used to take aderall, but its adverse effects outweigh the benefits for me and i prefer not to take medications..

    well ever since then, i feel as though i have become the joke of our clinical group. shes constantly making jokes about me and my ADD, and its embarassing... she even critiques my papers in front of the whole group and says things like "we can clearly see Ashley's ADD shining through here, she starts out great and then takes a sharp left turn and i dont know what shes talking about!" then everyone laughs.. except me..
    Houston, we have a problem!

    Ashley, I am horrified that you have felt made fun of and publicly critiqued. This is absolutely unacceptable in my estimation. I'd like to make a suggestion to you, if I may.

    I'd suggest that you request a formal meeting with this instructor during non-class/clinical time. This will provide for limited distractions and also indicate to her that you care strongly about your concerns. You might have a conversation that goes something like this ...

    "Dr./Ms. Doe, I wanted to discuss something with you that has concerned me with regard to my mental health clinical experience. There have been a few times when my diagnosis was referenced publicly that have resulted in a great deal of embarrassment to me. I am hoping that we can talk about this and perhaps come to a better understanding."

    Just like our vulnerable patients, students are also very vulnerable. Ashley, try to stick to "I" statements to keep the conversation heading in a productive direction. Try to organize your thoughts beforehand and make sure you are able to give a few examples of specific incidences where these things have occurred. You don't want to attack your instructor, but you are actually doing her a favor by letting her know how inappropriate her actions are. She might easily make this mistake again. Also, there might be a possibility that you have laughed along with the group at times which may have resulted in her and the class thinking it doesn't bother you much. I can easily see how this might happen as a way to protect yourself from feeling made fun of. You know the old saying, "I'm not laughing at you, I'm laughing with you." Or, "if you can't beat them, join them?" Certainly a nursing student wouldn't try "beating" her professor, so it is better to join in the fun, even if it is aimed at you. Hopefully, just by telling her that your feelings have been hurt will result in a heartfelt apology. I suspect they will. However, if that isn't her response, I'd suggest you take your concerns to your course coordinator and then follow the command all the way up. Be kind, informed, and assertive. Your health history is not up for public discussion unless you choose to make it so. Even if you have discussed your diagnosis among your peers and instructors, you may reserve the right to take it off the table as available to discuss in the future. If this has something to do with it, then perhaps you simply need to tell the instructor that moving forward, you'd prefer it if your diagnosis not be discussed publicly.

    Please let me know if I can help.

    Keep Rocking!

    Tabitha


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