resigning - page 3

by nurse62 9,743 Views | 25 Comments

I am wishing to resign from my current facility. I have been there for two years now and have come to find I am getting a bit burned out. I drive a great distance and my hours are very long. Giving a two weeks notice is... Read More


  1. 0
    Originally posted by grouchy
    I have always given palatable excuses and avoided mentioning staffing issues, etc. when resigning, out of fear of retribution. On one hand, I feel like a coward. On the other hand, I have noticed over the years, that the nursing community is small enough, even in the well-populated area in which I work. I can't believe how many times coworkers from one job have ended up being coworkers at another, years later. So far, I haven't had this happen with any of my former bosses, but I'm not taking any chances! Alot of people switch jobs frequently in nursing. So, you never know when you may be working with them again! I always keep that in mind when I'm not sure what to do or say in a difficult situation.
    I know what you mean about feeling like a coward. But after several instances when I told former employers what I REALLY thought, they became vindictive (as other posters have mentioned). We live and we learn.

    Sad but this is how they control our professional voices...they have the power to ruin us within the community, including blacklists. They know we know this, and it keeps us from speaking out.
  2. 0
    My philosophy has always been "don't burn your bridges." As another poster said, you never know when you're going to run into someone again. Giving a nice letter of resignation and working out your notice doesn't mean that certain individuals won't still blackball you later- I had this happen to me, a nurse manager who hated my guts and interfered with my getting a job. That was several years after she'd been my boss and it wasn't an institutional thing, we were long gone from the hospital we'd both worked at. You can't stop someone from being vindictive, but you don't have to give them a reason.

    I'm currently in management, myself, and I can tell you that I wouldn't be personally vindictive against someone I just didn't like, but if you didn't give decent notice, I sure wouldn't be willing to hire you back. It surprises me these days how many people just stop showing up, or "resign" with little or no notice, and don't think anything of it. (I understand personal and family emergencies, I'm not talking about those). If your employer declines to allow you to work out your notice, that's their issue, not yours; I've never had that happen to me.
  3. 0
    Originally posted by spacenurse
    Seems the disrespect of nurses and other staff, lack of awareness that hospitals exist for the purpose of providing NURSING care comes down from the top.
    If not for ethical nurses, physicians, and others they would literally be getting away with murder every day!

    Here are links to the tip of the iceburg of curruption at HCA:


    http://www.usdoj.gov/opa/pr/2003/June/03_civ_386.htm

    LARGEST HEALTH CARE FRAUD CASE IN U.S. HISTORY SETTLED
    HCA INVESTIGATION NETS RECORD TOTAL OF $1.7 BILLION

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - HCA Inc. (formerly known as Columbia/HCA and HCA - The Healthcare Company) has agreed to pay the United States $631 million in civil penalties and damages arising from false claims the government alleged it submitted to Medicare and other federal health programs, the Justice Department announced today.
    ---------------
    http://www.laweekly.com/ink/03/08/news-ireland.php

    While TV gushed last week over the Republicansí new Senate majority leader, Bill Frist, intervening in a traffic accident, portraying the former heart surgeon as a "Good Samaritan," in truth the GOP has simply replaced a racist with a corporate crook.
    Frist was born rich, and got richer ó thanks to massive criminal fraud by the family business.

    The basis of the Frist family fortune is HCA Inc. (Hospital Corporation of America), the largest for-profit hospital chain in the country, which was founded by Fristís father and brother. And, just as Karl Rove was engineering the scuttling of Trent Lott and the elevation of Frist, the Bush Justice Department suddenly ended a near-decadelong federal investigation into how HCA for years had defrauded Medicaid, Medicare and Tricare (the federal program that covers the military and their families), giving the greedy health-care behemothís executives a sweetheart settlement that kept them out of the can.
    ------------------------------
    http://tompaine.com/feature.cfm/ID/6991/view/print
    A Spoon Full Of Sugar
    Is Bill Frist Bitter Medicine?

    spacenurse:

    I have posted in these forums several times about the worst experience of my nursing caeer- working in a nightmare med-surg unit in the most toxic environment I've ever encountered; An HCA hospital!

    I freaked when I first heard about Frist being appointed Senate Majority Leader. I remember reading articles about what great health care reform we'd have with the famous Dr. Frist as the Senate Majority Leader!

    Famous for corruption, famous for corporate greed and famous for lousy for-profit hospitals!

    What a joke!


    BTW- when I resigned from the hospital, I did tell my NM why. She was incredulous, but she did not believe me. I can't really blame her, though. The things that were going on in that hospital were too outrageous to be believed.

    Since that job, I have never returned to the hospital setting, and won't.
  4. 0
    Hellllllo Nurse, So do you mean that things were going on that the nurse manager wasn't even aware of?
  5. 0
    Yes, cannoli.

    All kinds of awful things.
  6. 0
    Hello. I would like to get some opinions as well. I am not resigning but planning to change from being a full time nurse to per diem nurse. I will be having a 2nd panel interview next week for a part time position in another hospital (with full benefits), 0830-1700 4x a week (works great for my daughter's school time) and hoping that they will accept me. I have a positive feedback from my first interview.
    Just in case I got the job in the other hospital, I don't know what steps to take to tell my manager that I want to work per diem with them. I work in my current hospital for 2 years now. How do I approach them? Should I ask the HR first before making a move just in case I got accepted in the other hospital? So confusing!


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