Recruitment / Retention

  1. I am part of a grassroots,alternative professional nurses group(The Concerned Nurses Coalition).We have had some success at changing policy on a local level.Right now we are working with the Health Council to advise tristate hospitals on what REAL measures they can take to recruit AND RETAIN nurses.I truly believe this could be the start of something big but we need info.If anyone has time, could they post,(or Email us at CNCRNCARE@aol.com )their personal feelings on the subject.What do you love about nursing?What do you hate?Why might you leave nursing?Stuff like that...Thanks
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   Mijourney
    Hi Ron,
    Some of the why's on nurse recruitment and retention should be obvious after reviewing this bb. Some of mine include:
    1. inadequate pay for the risks and increasing responsibilities in nursing practice
    2. fear of patient harm, legal repercussions with loss of job
    3. lack of or inadequate professionalism, care, and concern demonstrated in nursing practice
    4. Better opportunities, pay, and less negative stress in other lines of work (this goes with #1); it just needs repeating
    5. Over-emphasis on production and profits as opposed to quality; outcome over process instead of process and outcome
    6. Unreasonable demands placed on nurses in light of the increasing pace of work coupled with high tech.

    Best wishes on your group's journey in nurse activism.
  4. by   Overland1
    Ron,

    Many hospitals need to learn how to recruit and hire people. It seems that when "Personnel" departs became "Human Resources" departments, they forgot their purpose (to recruit, hire, and retain PERSONNEL).

    I just went through a job search and found one at a nearby hospital. One hospital to which I applied sat on the application for more than a week. Another place still has not called any of the applicants back following our interviews (standard procedure there, I am told). The third place took my application, interviewed me within two days, arranged for the interview with two Dept. Managers almost immediately, and made me an offer a day later. Place #3 got the full-time nurse (me) and was most professional in so doing. It was like they were running a successful business ! I will be doing some per-diem at the first place; I finally heard from them today.

    By the way, the first place usually places ads in the area's newspapers, then tells people they are not hiring. They also have told prospective applicants to hand their apps in "at the switchboard desk out front." This, of course, does wonders for general confidentiality .
    Many HR departments really need to change their names back to"Personnel". Next, they need to put a sign reading "Personnel" on the door through which they enter their department at the start of their shift. This may jog their (collective) memory and give them a clue about what they are supposed to be doing.

    Some of this may sound radical, but I worked in business in one of my previous lives. In the company that employed me prior to my Nursing career, serving the customer and working with each other were top priorities.

    Jerry
  5. by   oramar
    Originally posted by Ron_Hamilton_RN:
    I am part of a grassroots,alternative professional nurses group(The Concerned Nurses Coalition).We have had some success at changing policy on a local level.Right now we are working with the Health Council to advise tristate hospitals on what REAL measures they can take to recruit AND RETAIN nurses.I truly believe this could be the start of something big but we need info.If anyone has time, could they post,(or Email us at CNCRNCARE@aol.com )their personal feelings on the subject.What do you love about nursing?What do you hate?Why might you leave nursing?Stuff like that...Thanks
    Go to the post, "Ethical dilemma, Go Agency for the Money?" It is a good example of what goes on inside a person's head before they leave a position. The nurse who wrote that post is giving you an insight into the mental process that takes place prior to the actually move from the position. It goes something like this: 1. unhappiness with one aspect of the postion,(in this case money) 2. unhappiness with two aspect of the postition,(in this case a poor choice for unit manager was made) 3. eventually a generalize dissatisfaction developes and the nurse begins to find fault with everything about the position. 4. the nurse leaves the postion. (other issues that cause dissatisfaction are overwork, short staffing, mandatory overtime, poor relationships with other staff members, a sense of not being included in the decisions made by management). In most cases, the nurse who bolts has been vocalizing his/her discomfort and his/her complaints have been ignored. Sometimes management will make remarks like, "nurses are a dime a dozen, we can always get someone else if you are unhappy, that is the way it is, like it or lump it, you are lucky to have a job." As a result, hospital managers find themselves paying $50 an hour(agency) for a skilled person they could have had for between $15-$18 an hour if they had taken time for a little TLC. This mass exodus by nurses from the bedside has been made one nurse at a time, it can has to be fixed one nurse at a time. Attention needs to be paid to the concerns of the bedside nurse by a caring managment who is willing to take action. What kind of action? More money, better benefits, selection of facilatator type managers who are involved personally with the staff, inclusion of the bedside nurse in the managment decisions that affect day to day care. I am sure other people will have things to add to the list.

    [This message has been edited by oramar (edited October 27, 2000).]

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Recruitment / Retention