Butterflys as Infusion Devices? - page 2

by jadelpn 2,926 Views | 13 Comments Guide

This is new to me, but I just wanted to put the question out there. There seems to be a few threads regarding using a butterfly needle (that one would use for a blood draw) as a device to infuse in the short term. Is this... Read More


  1. 0
    Well lthere is Kalbitor for Hereditary angioedema but that is a series of 3 SG injections...there is an IV medication of a different name as well. I have also seen many patients with a variety of blood factor deficencies that use a steel butterfly device to self administer or a family member of friend or parent can perform the injection. It is easier for them to use this type of device as it takes less skill although it does take several visits to instruct them and they need a home an IV home health agency or MD to call in case they cannot access a vein .
  2. 0
    Looks like the drug may be Cinryze. That seems to be a lot to expect from a patient in an emergency situation considering how long it took me to accomplish IV's and that there hopefully wouldn't be much opportunity for practice. It's amazing what can be done at home these days.
  3. 0
    Back in the "olden days," when I was a new grad in the NICU ...they didn't make IV catheters small enough for premature babies. But they did have butterflies that were small enough -- and that's what we used for most of our peripheral IV's. We'd keep them in hand veins and scalp veins for days. If that wasn't good enough, we'd have to get a physician to do a "cut down" to access a deeper vein big enough for a pediatric catheter to get into.
  4. 0
    It was in our medic book about using them on infants but I don't think I've ever seen them in the field. I think it was mentioned in the nursing book but I don't remember. It would be easier to just use a 22 or 24.


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