Nursing Academia We Need New Blood! - page 3

by VickyRN Senior Moderator | 13,705 Views | 59 Comments

The average age of academic nurse educators in the u.s. is 55.5 years. Meanwhile, the average age at which nurse faculty members retire is 62.5 years. it is not surprising, therefore, that at least 40% of currently-practicing... Read More


  1. 5
    I do not wish to discuss the nursing shortage because there is not one. Nurses are struggling to find work. Take a gander at the many topics of new grads looking for work. The only people preaching of a nursing shortage are nursing school administrators and nursing instructors, for obvious reasons. students need to be redirected to PT, OT, PA, SP, RT, or many of the other medical disciplines that are still in vogue. The recession saw many people lose their jobs and run towards nursing school with the impression that nursing is recession proof. This is a lie. I and many other were duped. The schools have our money and we have no jobs. The fact that the govt continues to grant work visas to foreign nurses is another kettle of fish and is very sad....anyway, this is the reality and anyone who thinks otherwise may need to remove their head from the sand and take a look around, outside of the academic setting....
    whichone'spink, mystory, hope3456, and 2 others like this.
  2. 6
    Quote from VickyRN
    Tell that to the hundreds of qualified students in my state (North Carolina) who either can't get into a nursing program, due insufficient seats, or have to wait up to 5 years to get into a program. And yes, there are new grad RN positions available in North Carolina. The main reason these programs do not have enough space and are turning away students or requiring some students to wait for years is lack of qualified faculty.
    I would disagree that shortage of faculty is necessarily the main reason. I've taught in ADN and BSN programs in NC, also, and the BON requires that, in order to increase the number of seats in a nursing program, the school have not only adequate faculty to accommodate the increased number of students, but also adequate, BON-approved clinical settings. In my experience, finding good clinical settings is what's getting harder and harder as time goes on, rather than finding sufficient faculty. At the same time that the number (and size) of nursing programs have been increasing in recent years, hospitals have been shrinking, merging into "healthcare systems," and consolidating specialty units/services -- and, while general med-surg hasn't been much of a problem in my experience, it has become extremely difficult to find adequate, appropriate clinical settings to provide good educational experiences for specialty rotations (peds, OB, psych, etc.). It was a nightmare every single semester the last time I had a teaching job, because the large urban area in which "my" program (state uni BSN) was located had so many nursing programs, all competing vigorously for the same few specialty clinical opportunities.

    Also, I agree with the previous posters who have commented that part of the program is too many nursing programs, esp. nursing programs of not-particularly-good quality. We all know that there are many poor quality nursing programs out there -- IMO, the public and the nursing community would be much better off if they were closed.
    mystory, elizabethgrad09, hope3456, and 3 others like this.
  3. 1
    Quote from mindlor
    I do not wish to discuss the nursing shortage because there is not one. Nurses are struggling to find work. Take a gander at the many topics of new grads looking for work. The only people preaching of a nursing shortage are nursing school administrators and nursing instructors, for obvious reasons. students need to be redirected to PT, OT, PA, SP, RT, or many of the other medical disciplines that are still in vogue. The recession saw many people lose their jobs and run towards nursing school with the impression that nursing is recession proof. This is a lie. I and many other were duped. The schools have our money and we have no jobs. The fact that the govt continues to grant work visas to foreign nurses is another kettle of fish and is very sad....anyway, this is the reality and anyone who thinks otherwise may need to remove their head from the sand and take a look around, outside of the academic setting....
    You sound very disillusioned, mindlor. Whatever hardships you or others are experiencing right now, the situation with nursing can and will literally change overnight. Again, this is the subject of another blog or thread. A massive nursing shortage is right around the corner and it will happen very suddenly just as this temporary glut of nurses appeared suddenly due to the Great Recession. And, let's get the record straight, I don't have my head in the sand (as your post implies), but I have extensively studied this subject from every conceivable angle. Again, if you wish to debate this "nursing shortage" subject, please start another thread (or join the hundreds of other threads here on allnurses discussing this topic), as the subject of this blog is the lack of younger faculty in nursing academia. For instance, I would appreciate any comments or insights you have to share as to why you personally would or would not consider a career in nursing academia. Thank you.
    iteachob likes this.
  4. 2
    Firstt let me say this Vicky...I have the utmost respect for you. Your contributions and insights to this community are invaluable. Also, I am not disillusioned. I love nursing. I believe in the nursing process and in the nursing model of care (holistic care).

    I am a male and thus tend to lean a bit more towards pragmatic thinking. I understand that that this is your thread and will certainly cease speaking of the real/perceived nursing shortage per your request.

    To answer your question, I can certainly see myself teaching nursing someday, hopefully at a prestigious school. The need for GOOD teachers is HUGE. Most nursing instructors have no formal training in education and basically read from power points. The nursing texts are mainly dull, and coma inducing, and not engaging to the student whatsoever.

    So yes, once I get some experience under my belt in the real world, I will enter into teaching but just as I enter into nursing, it will be a mission of change. I hope to change nursing annd the teaching of nursing because in both areas there is huge room for improvement.

    Also I feel that Elks point about clinical space is spot on. Do you know how many clinical hours I got in peds.....? I got 8, 8 whole hours.....

    Anyway, peace and have a great holiday season
    nursel56 and VickyRN like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    I would disagree that shortage of faculty is necessarily the main reason. I've taught in ADN and BSN programs in NC, also, and the BON requires that, in order to increase the number of seats in a nursing program, the school have not only adequate faculty to accommodate the increased number of students, but also adequate, BON-approved clinical settings. In my experience, finding good clinical settings is what's getting harder and harder as time goes on, rather than finding sufficient faculty. At the same time that the number (and size) of nursing programs have been increasing in recent years, hospitals have been shrinking, merging into "healthcare systems," and consolidating specialty units/services -- and, while general med-surg hasn't been much of a problem in my experience, it has become extremely difficult to find adequate, appropriate clinical settings to provide good educational experiences for specialty rotations (peds, OB, psych, etc.). It was a nightmare every single semester the last time I had a teaching job, because the large urban area in which "my" program (state uni BSN) was located had so many nursing programs, all competing vigorously for the same few specialty clinical opportunities.

    Also, I agree with the previous posters who have commented that part of the program is too many nursing programs, esp. nursing programs of not-particularly-good quality. We all know that there are many poor quality nursing programs out there -- IMO, the public and the nursing community would be much better off if they were closed.
    Thank you for sharing your insights, elkpark. We have had the same frustrating experience trying to find adequate clinical sites for our pediatric clinical rotations. The general pediatric unit we use is literally being overrun with students (and not just nursing students, but medical students, respiratory therapy students, etc.).

    What we have experienced in our nursing program has been major difficulty getting some faculty positions filled (especially those in peds). We have had stellar candidates apply, only to withdraw their application once they saw how low the pay is (relative to other positions they have had, such as pediatric nurse practitioners).

    I agree with you about some nursing programs being poor quality and that we all would be better off without them.

    Our faculty in our program are also mainly in their 50s. I am concerned about the near future (the subject of this blog) when these older faculty begin to retire. I do not see an abundance of younger educators available to replace them. In fact, many of our younger nurse faculty are leaving us for greener pastures. I would love to see more younger nurses entering our field.
  6. 0
    Oh Vicky, one more request...

    What in your opinion signifies young?

    Cuz I am not young lol
  7. 0
    Another problem as stated before is salary....

    Many of these "young" folks have families and expenses and the schools are going to have to pay them a living wage......
  8. 0
    Quote from mindlor
    Firstt let me say this Vicky...I have the utmost respect for you. Your contributions and insights to this community are invaluable. Also, I am not disillusioned. I love nursing. I believe in the nursing process and in the nursing model of care (holistic care).

    I am a male and thus tend to lean a bit more towards pragmatic thinking. I understand that that this is your thread and will certainly cease speaking of the real/perceived nursing shortage per your request.

    To answer your question, I can certainly see myself teaching nursing someday, hopefully at a prestigious school. The need for GOOD teachers is HUGE. Most nursing instructors have no formal training in education and basically read from power points. The nursing texts are mainly dull, and coma inducing, and not engaging to the student whatsoever.

    So yes, once I get some experience under my belt in the real world, I will enter into teaching but just as I enter into nursing, it will be a mission of change. I hope to change nursing annd the teaching of nursing because in both areas there is huge room for improvement.

    Also I feel that Elks point about clinical space is spot on. Do you know how many clinical hours I got in peds.....? I got 8, 8 whole hours.....

    Anyway, peace and have a great holiday season
    Thank you for sharing your insights, mindlor. I would welcome you into nursing academia. Besides needing younger instructors, we also have need for a more diverse nurse faculty workforce. We desperately need male nurse educators to mentor our male nursing students and give them a more gender-balanced view of nursing.

    And yes, we would welcome your new perspectives, your vision for change. That's why we need new blood!

    In terms of the same old same old in nursing education, we need new pragmatic learning models for millennial students, ones that will equip them for the new realities of healthcare and the dynamic workplace issues in the 21st century.
  9. 0
    Quote from mindlor
    Oh Vicky, one more request...

    What in your opinion signifies young?

    Cuz I am not young lol
    I am 56 and in my mind (I am not being facetious) I am still young. When I look in the mirror, sometimes I don't recognize who I am and think I am looking at my mother instead. But my body and mind still feel young and vibrant and I start each day with enthusiasm. I am especially enthusiastic about teaching, and that's what keeps me young.

    I don't believe I will be "old" until I am 90 or perhaps 100, lol

    In terms of younger faculty, I would like to see nurses just two or three years out of our BSN program start taking courses towards a career in nursing education. Right now, this is rare - only see a select few. Most want to becomes NPs or CRNAs.
  10. 1
    haha I am 47 but by the time time I am prepared educationally and experientially to teach nursing I will be well into my 50's. However, like many of my contemporaries I have an extreme Peter Pan complex LOL

    As many have said, pay and benefits are the central issue here....if schools want dynamic younger teachers, they are going to have to pay up. Things will not improve as you are hoping until that occurs.....

    Why should someone become an adjunct and work for peanuts when they can go make 100G per year practicing.....?
    VickyRN likes this.


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