Nurse Educators, Introduce Yourselves! - page 17

Welcome to the Nurse Educator Forum. It is my desire that you find this a warm, inviting place and will come here often for friendly, collegial discussions. Let me introduce myself: I have been an... Read More

  1. by   sirI
    Quote from FarainFlorida
    Hello,
    I am a coordinator of a vocational school in Florida with some challanges before me. The programs I oversee have been up and running for a long time, some 30 years (PN). However, looking at the policies (I have been here 4 weeks) some things do not make sense. That is for another thread....

    I have been an RN for 10 years and an educator for 4. I am also a MS (Administration) major about halfway finished.

    I have 2 lovely daughters and I am a single mom, much more relieved since my ex is gone.

    I enjoy this site because of the access to large groups of nurses and the responsiveness to the posts. Staff are always helpful and enlightening.

    Look forward to many problem solving and fun discussions!

    Fara:roll :roll :roll :roll
    Hello, Fara,:Melody:

    I want to welcome you to Allnurses.com Great to have you with us in the Educator forum. I look forward to seeing more of your posts and have the opportunity to bounce off ideas with you.

    Check out the other forums, too.
  2. by   organichombre
    Hello folks,
    I too am in the middle of a masters in nursing education, and have posted another thread about alternative health practices.
    I hope to complete my program and either teach in a conventional BSN/MSN program or continue at my present institution as a nurse educator.
    My theme here would have to be "Where are all the male instructors?"! Personally I never had a male nursing instructor. A few taught physiology and patho but none in the "nursing" classes. I'm hoping that by becoming an educator I can influence more men to consider nursing as a career.
  3. by   TreeSawRN
    Hello Organgichombre:
    I have much in common with you. I am working on my MS degree in Education (100% On-Line) and am a BSN . I have been an RN for 27 years in California and have a broad nursing background.
    I had a male instructor in my original ADN program 1974, but none since. There are several male nurse educators in my institutional setting however. Most of the males educators I know are either atttracted to ED or Critical care. One is an NP but loves to teach.
    TreeSawRN
  4. by   organichombre
    Hello TreeSaw,
    Thanks for the reply. Are you by chance going thorough the University of Phoenix for your degree? I've been pleasantly impressed with their program so far.
    I hope that I can translate all of this information into an effective teaching style!
  5. by   TreeSawRN
    I am going to California State University, East Bay. U of Phoenix was too expensive ($18,000) and I didn't want to have to re-take statistics, pathophysiology, or physical assessment, so I'm working on my MS in education with a certificate in on online teaching and learning ($10,000). I have already earned the certificate and have two more classes after this quarter before I complete the MS degree requirements.
    I figure that when I retire (I'm 49- so that won't be for a while), I can still do work from home as an online instructor and course design expert.
    TreeSawRN
    Last edit by TreeSawRN on Oct 28, '05
  6. by   organichombre
    Very interesting ideas there. Good luck!
  7. by   lbp60
    I know that I am "late" in this reply but this is my 11th year teaching in an ADN program and I find that I put more hours in than I did as a floor nurse. If I have morning clinicals, I'm as the hospital from 6am-12:30pm, office hours till class at 2pm-4pm, then more office hours and usually home by 6:30pm. With afternoon clinicals, my day starts at 8:30am with office hours, class from 9-11am, office hours till clinical starts at 1pm and ends supposedly at 7pm but usually not out of there till 7:45pm. On non-clinical days, I have office hours, meetings, grading, exam writing, reading, etc to do. Usually spend 4-8 hours/weekend working also.
  8. by   organichombre
    And you still enjoy teaching or are you telling us that you're at the end of your rope, or don't do it...? I've gotten spoiled I know with my 12 hour shifts and an extra day off, so it will be a challenge for me when I do begin teaching ft.
  9. by   lbp60
    Quote from organichombre
    And you still enjoy teaching or are you telling us that you're at the end of your rope, or don't do it...? I've gotten spoiled I know with my 12 hour shifts and an extra day off, so it will be a challenge for me when I do begin teaching ft.
    I was reacting to the post by Ksfrn66 who said "I actually am a full time instructor - this year I will apply for promotion to Assistant (or maybe associate I can never keep it straight!) professor. I do not teach in the BSN program, just the ADN so my day is done by 3 at the latest. I usually start at 9 am, we take an hour lunch and we leave by 3. Gravy job! I luv it!"

    I haven't met any nurse educator who said it is a gravy job! You put a lot of time in but there are many rewards in seeing the students grow throughout the program. Good luck!<!-- / message -->
  10. by   organichombre
    I really want to teach once I finish my degree but don't know if financially I'll be able to fulltime. I guess I'll just have to wait and see.
    Thanks
  11. by   Roro
    hello to all nurse educators,
    I was graduated in 1996 from my BSN degree and I worked directly as a pediatric RN for around 8 years. Then, I started as a pediatric clinical educator as of February 2005. Although, I had a very little experience in that field i enjoyed it a lot. i was graduated in june 2005 as a master in public health with the concentration on health policy and management.
    In addition, i started as a Nursing instructor as of october 2005.
    Being a nurse educator is something very interesting and I enjoy it a lot.
    it is not something easy to become as a nurse educator since we should be very patient with an excellent background knowledge in addition to a very good clinical skills as well as good critical thinking and analytical abilities.
    it is a challenge for me to be a nurse educator. Sometimes, I felt that it is something rewarding for me especially when I see my students interested about a certain topic and that they are interacting with each other.
    best regards and good luck to all nurse educators.
    Roro.
  12. by   sirI
    Quote from Roro
    hello to all nurse educators,
    I was graduated in 1996 from my BSN degree and I worked directly as a pediatric RN for around 8 years. Then, I started as a pediatric clinical educator as of February 2005. Although, I had a very little experience in that field i enjoyed it a lot. i was graduated in june 2005 as a master in public health with the concentration on health policy and management.
    In addition, i started as a Nursing instructor as of october 2005.
    Being a nurse educator is something very interesting and I enjoy it a lot.
    it is not something easy to become as a nurse educator since we should be very patient with an excellent background knowledge in addition to a very good clinical skills as well as good critical thinking and analytical abilities.
    it is a challenge for me to be a nurse educator. Sometimes, I felt that it is something rewarding for me especially when I see my students interested about a certain topic and that they are interacting with each other.
    best regards and good luck to all nurse educators.
    Roro.
    Hello, Roro. Welcome to the Educator forum. Great to have you with us. You are correct, this role is most rewarding. Enjoy the forums.
  13. by   Bangkokmk
    Hi, all. I've been a nurse for 22 years in Emergency, Cardiac services, and ICU. Just recently became clinical educator for the ICU where I work. I'm one class shy of earning my BSN at age 47. I'm glad to see this site. As a new educator I have lots of questions and it looks like I am not alone in this. Thanks.

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