RRT Contemplates change to nursing w/accelerated program, any advice??

  1. Hi all, I've been reading a lot on this site. I know some RT's make the switch and I would like to know why. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. I am somewhat of a type A personality, just graduated, an RRT and am hoping the two would give me more options.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   EricJRN
    Recently we've seen a few RRT's post here who are considering the switch so that they can pursue advanced practice nursing, like CRNA or nurse practitioner.
  4. by   RRT2RN2CRNA
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    Last edit by RRT2RN2CRNA on Jan 19, '08 : Reason: duplicate
  5. by   RRT2RN2CRNA
    Quote from AllynRRT
    Hi all, I've been reading a lot on this site. I know some RT's make the switch and I would like to know why. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. I am somewhat of a type A personality, just graduated, an RRT and am hoping the two would give me more options.

    I am doing it- and it rocks. But I knew from the beginning that RT was a means to an end for me. No offense to RT lifers at all; RT is a great profession in an of itself. It's an individual preference.

    I did RT because I couldn't be bothered waiting to get into an RN program, which in NY are extremely popular and inundated with bright people. It's just luck of the draw who gets in.

    RT and RN pay are pretty equal initially... but RN pay goes up a lot more down the line. The nursing lobby is very strong- RT lobby is weak but improving- and RT is rarely a priority to hospital administration in regards to funding, training, hiring and retention.

    If you go for RT, you can usually get into school right away, go for 2 years and then you can jump right in and get earning. Then you can do an online (Excelsior AAS in Nursing) or school based RT-RN bridge program in a year while you're working as an RT and getting PAID experience.

    You do not have to do one of those Accelerated BSN programs. If you already are an RT, Accel BSN is IMHO complete overkill. They are a pain in the neck to get into, and you cant work while you're in one. If you have an associates in RT, and you want a BSN particularly you can always do an RN-BSN bridge for a few months after you do your RT-RN bridge. The goal is to get your RN license ASAP, and then work while doing your BSN online. It may sound contrived, but it works out great and is the best way to do it financially.

    An RT-RN Bridge program is a fantastic alternate way to get where you want to go without dealing with nursing school admissions hurdle. You can just run right around it, and get on the road to where you want to be, and make money while you're at it. Once you have your CRT license, you can just enroll in Excelsior and start your RT-RN bridge whenever you want. You are more in control of the timing of your pace and your schedule. Which is important bc most likely you will be working *nights* as a new RT, which would pretty much rule out a daytime Accel BSN program.

    Additionally, I hate to say this, but if you're a Type A personality... you'll find yourself in the minority in respiratory and you may get frustrated and bored with your limited scope of practice.
    Being an RRT/RN gives you a *huge* amount of options- especially if you want to go further in to CRNA or FNP.

    If you have it in you- go for it. You won't regret it.

    Hope this helps-

    A

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