Decisions decisions...

  1. 0
    Hey everyone,

    I currently work for a disclosed facility (left out due to how large this facility is and who may or may not be reading this) and have been in "orientation" for almost 2 months, but I recently received another job offer which I have already started the process for.

    Everyone is incredibly nice where I currently work including the supervisor. The job is incredibly easy and very relaxed. The downside is it's a drive to get there.

    The other job is closer, more pay, but I am left with the mystery of the who I work with and how the job will end up.

    My question is pretty much what should I do?
  2. 7 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    You never know how any job will add up. Since you value your time and money is a consideration, figure the real cost to drive your vehicle, add up the time you drive to and from work (meaning time you are working for no pay, in effect), then do a real comparison between the two jobs. You might find the financial difference is so great, you won't hesitate to take the new job.
  4. 0
    But am I in the wrong when it comes to money? (Stupid question for certain people I know) I like nursing and helping people which both jobs do (just different populations), but I feel like I am going to be letting ALOT of people down if I make the jump
  5. 0
    You're not in the wrong for wanting the most money with the shortest drive you can get, unless you don't need to work, and only do it to keep occupied, no- but that doesn't appear to be the case with you. As far as letting people down, I'll take a leap and suggest that since you already 'started the process' for the new job, that the proverbial cat is already out of the bag, meaning that your current job already has wind of that, and any letting down has been done already. Nursing circles are amazingly small, even in big cities. Also, you say your job is swell, yet you are still in orientation? My guess is you really don't care for it, and are conflcted about what to do. Tough call with the economy the way it is.
  6. 0
    Oh another fact I failed to mention was that I applied for both of these jobs at the same time. It's just one got to me before the other, so I took it then the other job had recently contacted me and started moving me further in the process. Also, the cat is still in the bag and no one but a few trusted employees know. Nursing circles are indeed small even in big cities, but I'm not dealing with one city. It isn't "money isn't an issue" but more of "time is of the essence" with my dilemma. Also, nurses are caring people by definition, so I would hate having to turn down good people for my seemingly selfish desire.
  7. 0
    My suggestion would be that if your current job is 3 12's, to see if you can work both jobs for a period of time (even if taking the closer job part time, or going part time at your current position if possible) and then decide which job you like better. You say that your current job is easy, but it is a farther distance from your house and pays less money. The new job might be more demanding, but is closer and pays better. If the new job doesn't make you pull your hair out from patient load (number of patients, acuity of patients, etc) or want to scream because of your co-workers you might find that a little bit of a higher "stress" is worth not having to drive so far AND still earning more money.
    If you start the new job and hate it, you still have the other job to fall back on. If you start the new job and love it, you might think of quitting the "old" job or going PRN to bump your pay when you feel like it.
    Just something to consider.
  8. 0
    Quote from anothernurse
    Oh another fact I failed to mention was that I applied for both of these jobs at the same time. It's just one got to me before the other, so I took it then the other job had recently contacted me and started moving me further in the process. Also, the cat is still in the bag and no one but a few trusted employees know. Nursing circles are indeed small even in big cities, but I'm not dealing with one city. It isn't "money isn't an issue" but more of "time is of the essence" with my dilemma. Also, nurses are caring people by definition, so I would hate having to turn down good people for my seemingly selfish desire.
    So as I understand it, you just started working at this supereasy job with great co-workers and a bad commute. Not a good idea to quit so soon. You'll be burning bridges.
  9. 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    So as I understand it, you just started working at this supereasy job with great co-workers and a bad commute. Not a good idea to quit so soon. You'll be burning bridges.
    I don't plan on burning this bridge per say, but that would be a huge risk for me. I think I have made my decision though and thanks for the replies


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