A BA in Psych + ADN-are they good enough for RN jobs which require a BSN?

  1. 0 Any insight would help.
    I currently already have a BA in Psych and I am working on getting my ADN. I have heard some people say that there are certain RN jobs that require a BSN in Nursing(Ex Managment, ICU etc).
    Does anyone know if already having the BA in another subject and having the ADN would cut it or if an employer would consider this as an equivelent?

    thanks...
  2. Visit  Nemrac profile page

    About Nemrac

    From 'SLC, UT'; 41 Years Old; Joined Feb '04; Posts: 24.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    That would depend on the specific employer -- some would find it acceptable and some would not. 'Fraid that's probably the closest you can get to an answer ...
  4. Visit  purplemania profile page
    0
    also depends on the type of job you are seeking. If you had your ADN and years of experience that is one thing. But NEW GRAD with ADN has neither the exp or education for some positions. Many people work as ADN and get back in school part-time for the BSN.
  5. Visit  Elenaster profile page
    0
    Look for an accelrated BSN program. You'll will probably go to school for the same amount of time as you would getting an ADN, but graduate with a BSN based on the fact that you've completed those "core" classes required for a Bachelor's.

    I was in the same boat as you, but decided to go ahead and get the BSN in 6 semesters instead of the ADN in 5. It hasn't made a difference in my employment as an RN, but I'm free to apply to graduate school as soon as I take the GRE. That was my main motivation for going ahead with the BSN.
  6. Visit  heatherbless profile page
    1
    Quote from Nemrac
    Any insight would help.
    I currently already have a BA in Psych and I am working on getting my ADN. I have heard some people say that there are certain RN jobs that require a BSN in Nursing(Ex Managment, ICU etc).
    Does anyone know if already having the BA in another subject and having the ADN would cut it or if an employer would consider this as an equivelent?

    thanks...
    hey, just stick with what you have right now....finish the ADN, and then just bridge with an online BSN--there are plenty of programns online out there--I really think the challenge these days is just getting into a good school/so, good luck to you. hty/
    mxgandhi likes this.
  7. Visit  smk1 profile page
    0
    you will probably only need a few classes to finish your bsn since you already have a BA in psych. if you find that your BA + ADN isn't getting you into the positions you want just take the few classes to get the official BSN.
  8. Visit  Nemrac profile page
    0
    Quote from heatherbless
    hey, just stick with what you have right now....finish the ADN, and then just bridge with an online BSN--there are plenty of programns online out there--I really think the challenge these days is just getting into a good school/so, good luck to you. hty/
    Thank you everyone for the good advice. And thanks for the good luck wishes......I need them

    Seriously though, I am going to get the ADN and then if I need too or want too in the future will just go for a BSN at night or online...after all....most of the hard classes will have already been done. Thanks again everyone.....
  9. Visit  Maisie profile page
    0
    Most schools have a 5 year limit on the science classes.
  10. Visit  lady_jezebel profile page
    1
    ICU or any type of bedside nursing -- nope, you don't need a BSN. An ADN/RN is fine.

    For management & "research" type positions -- depends. Some employers have a bias for the BSN thing, which is ridiculous in my opinion. The BSN is hardly any different than a BA/ADN combination in reality, but many managers/employers don't seem to understand this. Maybe you should emphasize all of your coursework and academic achievements on the resume & at the interview -- help them understand what you have already achieved.

    I went back to school for the BSN after obtaining a BS in another field. The BSN has not offered me any advantages over ADN co-workers, for I have NO DESIRE to go into management. For the bedside, and RN is an RN is an RN.
    mxgandhi likes this.
  11. Visit  TXHorns profile page
    0
    My gosh I have a VERY similar situation to you! I have a BA in Psych, and am about ot finish my ADN in Dec of this year. HOwever, I also have a MEd in Health Education, want to do research nursing. I plan to get a recruiter to help me find the best fit and an amployer who would be able to let my education and work experience compensate the same. My advice to you.....finish what you are doing then do either an RN-BSN or RN-MSN later if that's what you want to do.
  12. Visit  ADNCyn profile page
    0
    Quote from Maisie
    Most schools have a 5 year limit on the science classes.
    But only if you have gotten "some" degree within those 5 years. Of course this may vary by school or state in which you are applying. Also, one can go straight BSN-MSN track with previous BA's or BS's with an ADN (in shorter or equal amount of time than getting the BSN with a concurrent BA or BS)... Great options either way.
  13. Visit  DC2RN profile page
    0
    If you want a specific position, and the job description says BSN required, and you have a BA and ADN, just apply anyway. It cannot hurt. The worst they could say is "No."

    Some schools have a bridge between a BS or BA and a BSN. These schools usually only offer the bridge program if you are getting your MSN through them. The bridge programs consist of just two or three classes. You can find out about this at www.allnursingschools.com. This web site is a great resource.
  14. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    How much difference there is between a BSN and a ADN plus BS in another field depends upon the specific schools in question. Anyone who says they are "always the same" or "always different" is giving you an answer too superficial to use in your decision-making.

    Some ADN programs include most of the same content found in most BSN programs -- but not all. Also, some BS programs in other fields include the content that is "missing" in a particular ADN program, but most do not. Also, you must consider that each discipline has its own traditions and perspectives upon which it is founded. Taking similar courses grounded in another discipline would be helpful, but might not include some key points pertinent to nursing. It can be very helpful to take classes in another discipline -- but in order to maintain a nursing perspective and remain grounded in the nursing disciplines, those courses need to be taken IN ADDITION TO nursing courses, not INSTEAD OF nursing courses.

    The type of content that is often not included in the ADN program, but is often included in BSN programs includes:
    1. More emphasis on nursing theory and the major schools of thought within the nursing discipline
    2. Nursing reseach -- methods, particular problems, issues, etc. related to NURSING research that might be different from the research traditions of other disciplines.
    3. Familiarity with the nursing literature. Granted, a lot of BSN programs do a bad job of this -- but the better programs have the students writing papers, researching topics, doing presentations, etc. that get the students to explore the literature a bit. ADN programs tend to do less of this.
    4. Nursing leadership issues -- not just administration/management, but issues related to the profession and to being a leader (any type of leader) within the profession. Neither ADN programs nor courses in other disciplines would routinely cover that content.
    5. Some introductory content related to advanced roles and patient education.

    Those are just the things I thought of off the top of my head. It's not that ADN programs never include any of the above topics ... they just tend not to emphasize them as much. Courses in other disciplines wouldn't cover them at all. Unless they have made an extra effort to get that content, people whose degrees are in other fields sometimes find themselves "out of step" with their colleagues who have BSN's and graduate degrees in nursing because they never got the advanced content within nursing. Even though they may have higher degrees, their NURSING education stopped at the beginner level. That puts them at a disadvantage -- a disadvantage that can be overcome, but a disadvantage nonetheless.

    llg


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