What is it with nurses and cell phones? Just a vent. - page 28

by fakebee

27,891 Visits | 289 Comments

Recently my hospital has upgraded or introduced multiple new computer programs that have required almost every level of nurse from bedside to administration to attend class in order to use the new technology. I have assisted in... Read More


  1. 6
    Quote from PatMac10,SN
    Which is solely YOUR opinion, which unfortunately doesn't represent the total workforce.
    It would be odd (and probably unprecedented) if any singular opinion represented the entire workforce (that includes your opinion(s) as well).

    But really, the opinion that will likely matter most to you will be your employer's, and while you can express your opinion on proper uses of technology in the workplace freely here, you may find a very different climate once you graduate and get your first nursing job. Ultimately, whatever your personal views may be, you're likely going to have to decide which is more important to you...justifying behavior that an employer might find unsavory or paying your bills.
    Conqueror+, merd01, Fiona59, and 3 others like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from triquee

    It would be odd (and probably unprecedented) if any singular opinion represented the entire workforce (that includes your opinion(s) as well).

    But really, the opinion that will likely matter most to you will be your employer's, and while you can express your opinion on proper uses of technology in the workplace freely here, you may find a very different climate once you graduate and get your first nursing job. Ultimately, whatever your personal views may be, you're likely going to have to decide which is more important to you...justifying behavior that an employer might find unsavory or paying your bills.
    You are correct. We will certainly have to see!
  3. 7
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    "I'm special! My family is WAY more important than my patients! If I choose to text my family members about the minutiae of every day life that can certainly wait 12 hours, then that's TOTALLY APPROPRIATE! And it's not like I do it in front of anyone! Whenever I feel like talking to my family, I leave my patients, go into the break room, and text away! So it's a completely LEGITIMATE use of a cell phone!" *pops gum*

    Give me a break.
    And now, to Windex my screen where I spewed my soda all over it.
    Conqueror+, merd01, Fiona59, and 4 others like this.
  4. 0
    Personally I think technology these days is a great thing and nurses should embrace it...as long as it doesn't impede patient care. Yes we use our cell phones during our breaks or during downtime - our supervisors do the same. I have even seen our nurse manager whip out her phone at the desk during the daytime. Again, it doesn't impede patient care. I have a lot of apps that I use as a resource on my phone.

    In school, the use of cell phones were prohibited for the most part. We did have instructors who utilized text messaging, though. I remember my public health clinical instructor telling us to text her once we were done for the day. We were also supposed to text her if we were done early to get the "ok" to go home early or to go to another site for another assignment.
  5. 2
    Quote from turnforthenurseRN
    Personally I think technology these days is a great thing and nurses should embrace it...as long as it doesn't impede patient care. Yes we use our cell phones during our breaks or during downtime - our supervisors do the same. I have even seen our nurse manager whip out her phone at the desk during the daytime. Again, it doesn't impede patient care. I have a lot of apps that I use as a resource on my phone.
    This is completely separate from those who whip out their phones when there is work to be done- I work with a surgical tech who, as soon as she takes her sterile gown off, pulls out the phone and starts texting/checking Facebook or email. Meanwhile, the patient still needs dressings finished, foley secured, and moved to the patient's bed. Most people only have an issue with the phones when they interfere with patient care. Breaks are something completely different- most times people aren't on the clock.

    Quote from turnforthenurseRN
    In school, the use of cell phones were prohibited for the most part. We did have instructors who utilized text messaging, though. I remember my public health clinical instructor telling us to text her once we were done for the day. We were also supposed to text her if we were done early to get the "ok" to go home early or to go to another site for another assignment.
    Sounds like a legitimate use of texting, and it also doesn't interfere with patient care.
    Fiona59 and turnforthenurseRN like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from Sweet_Wild_Rose
    This is completely separate from those who whip out their phones when there is work to be done- I work with a surgical tech who, as soon as she takes her sterile gown off, pulls out the phone and starts texting/checking Facebook or email. Meanwhile, the patient still needs dressings finished, foley secured, and moved to the patient's bed. Most people only have an issue with the phones when they interfere with patient care. Breaks are something completely different- most times people aren't on the clock.
    In this case, yes, it is a problem. As I mentioned before, as long as it doesn't impede patient care, I don't see a problem with it. In this example, however, there is definitely a problem.
  7. 4
    From what I see and hear in all kinds of places, including restrooms, I think cell phones are horrid fomites.

    Would love to see the surveillance folks swab a few of them and see what grows out.
    Fiona59, turnforthenurseRN, nursel56, and 1 other like this.
  8. 0
    I didn't mean to cause such a commotion with my, I'm still a good nurse comment. I find it odd that people have absolutely zero idea what a good nurse should include. I have an idea of what that entails at least for me, that involves making sure my patients are taken care of and all the millions of little things that go along with that. I don't feel I have to justify my need to 'constantly be in touch with the world', but since it was asked directly.. I am 300 miles from home, I moved for my job (I actually really really like my job) but when I am here, at this small town 300 miles away from home all I do is work, drive, sleep, get ready for work, drive and repeat. 12 hours between shifts isn't nearly enough; I go home every chance I get, so in the mean time yes, I do still want to be connected to my hometown or what I like to call my real life. As much as I love my co-workers and patients this is still a job and I wouldn't be here if my check didn't clear. I work night shift and there is lots of down time, which is partly why I chose this job. All that being said even if I was 3 miles from home, I would still text. Now time to hang my 0500's
  9. 8
    Quote from Milo27
    I didn't mean to cause such a commotion with my, I'm still a good nurse comment. I find it odd that people have absolutely zero idea what a good nurse should include. I have an idea of what that entails at least for me, that involves making sure my patients are taken care of and all the millions of little things that go along with that. I don't feel I have to justify my need to 'constantly be in touch with the world', but since it was asked directly.. I am 300 miles from home, I moved for my job (I actually really really like my job) but when I am here, at this small town 300 miles away from home all I do is work, drive, sleep, get ready for work, drive and repeat. 12 hours between shifts isn't nearly enough; I go home every chance I get, so in the mean time yes, I do still want to be connected to my hometown or what I like to call my real life. As much as I love my co-workers and patients this is still a job and I wouldn't be here if my check didn't clear. I work night shift and there is lots of down time, which is partly why I chose this job. All that being said even if I was 3 miles from home, I would still text. Now time to hang my 0500's
    If you're at work, you should be working rather than keeping in touch with the home town. Whether you work 300 miles from home or 3 blocks, your employer is paying for your time. If you're spending all your "free time" at work texting, I beg to differ with your assertion that you're "still a good nurse." Competent, I might buy. But someone who is constantly texting at work does not excel at working, or at nursing.
    Conqueror+, merd01, Fiona59, and 5 others like this.
  10. 1
    I hate.hate.hate it when I see a patient's call light ringing and ringing, know that they are a sicker/"busier" patient, assume the nurse is busy, go to help the patient and then....see that the RN is sitting in the alcove next to the room engrossed in their phone. You HAVE to hear the light!

    If you are going to be glued to your phone, at least put it away when one of YOUR PATIENTS who is within feet of you clearly needs something.

    I find it amusing too that I'm saying this, because I'm actually pretty young and should fit into the demographic of the most phone-obsessed people, but oddly enough I've never been super enthralled with mine. It's with me at work, and I'll definitely check it on breaks, but I frequently enjoy going hours w/o checking it. Go figure.
    Fiona59 likes this.


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