Surgical NP. Experience in OR in "children's hopital?"

  1. 0 I have been working in med/surg unit for 7yrs. I am to start FNP in August. My goal is to be a surgical NP but I don't have any experience in OR. I am looking for part job in OR. No adult hopital near by my house offers a part time position. There is no way I do full time work and study. There is a children's hospital that offeres a part time position. Do you think working in OR in children't hospital will be beneficial to be a surgical NP in an adult hospital?
  2. Enjoy this?

    Join thousands and get our weekly Nursing Insights newsletter with the hottest discussions, articles, and toons.


  3. Visit  whomiskim profile page

    About whomiskim

    Joined Jun '13; Posts: 17; Likes: 1.

    12 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  kguill975 profile page
    0
    Disclaimer: I'm a Surgical NP and this is MY OPINION. I have worked in the OR for 13 years, first as a scrub tech, then CNOR, and now ACNP. Once again, this is MY OPINION. Some people get so bent out of shape :-) .

    You don't need OR experience to become a Surgical NP. If it's a hospital where the nurses scrub and circulate, then you'll have a small advantage at learning the instruments, draping, sequencing, and providing exposure. Other than that, I think the only benefit to working in the OR is that you're able to network for future jobs. You can attend a RNFA program for 7 days and it'll teach you what you need to know to begin, then you'll go out and build on it while practicing. If you like kids, go into a pedi surgery practice, so you can get congenital surgery cases, reimbursement is pretty nice. If you don't like pedi (like me), spinal cases like fusions and laminectomies pay top dollar. Do not go into general surgery (like me), the hours suck! Good Luck!
  5. Visit  Annaiya profile page
    0
    OR is not my background, but I agree that it doesn't seem like RN OR experience would be overly helpful. As a surgical NP, your job will be very different from an OR RN. I think it would be much better to concentrate your clinical hours in surgical practices, where you will actually be getting the experience that you need.
  6. Visit  whomiskim profile page
    0
    Thank you so much for thoughts!!!
  7. Visit  PediOR profile page
    0
    I've been circulating for almost 4 years and I would love to do something like that! I thought surgeons only hired PAs though! Can you tell me about your master's program and where you work?
  8. Visit  Annaiya profile page
    0
    By your name "pediOR" I'm guessing you're working in peds. One surgeon I know has 2 NPs working for him and they are both ACPNPs. If you want to stay with kids that is what I would suggest getting for your certification. I did clinicals with a pedi surgery PNP, she'd been doing it for 25 years, so she didn't have her acute care certification. We have some PAs but most are NPs. All you need to do is concentrate your clinical hours with surgery. In kids, neurosurgery is an area with a ton of jobs for ACPNPs.
  9. Visit  nomadcrna profile page
    0
    I would recommend an FNP as you can do both adults and kids.
  10. Visit  Annaiya profile page
    0
    Quote from nomadcrna
    I would recommend an FNP as you can do both adults and kids.
    Only in some states, in the state I live in, an FNP cannot be a surgical NP.
  11. Visit  PediOR profile page
    0
    I do have some experience with adults but I prefer working with kids. It's hard to decide between acute care NP and FNP...I didn't realize that some states don't allow FNPs to assist in surgery. Although that might not be the case with an RNFA certification. I think I'm more concerned with being well-rounded and marketable overall.
  12. Visit  kguill975 profile page
    0
    Quote from PediOR
    I do have some experience with adults but I prefer working with kids. It's hard to decide between acute care NP and FNP...I didn't realize that some states don't allow FNPs to assist in surgery. Although that might not be the case with an RNFA certification. I think I'm more concerned with being well-rounded and marketable overall.
    Texas is the only state that currently requires APNs to complete a RNFA program. Look on YOUR state's BON website, it'll tell you if FNPs in your state can be first assists. While everyone means well, take no one's word on anything, look it up for yourself. BTW, I learned very little from my assisting program, the bulk of my knowledge has come from scrubbing in and assisting, not reading a book. Good Luck, it's the best place to be.
  13. Visit  nomadcrna profile page
    0
    Yep we are well aware that not all states allow this practice but your statement of some states may be more accurate as "a few" states or maybe even 1 or 2 states. What state are you in?
    Think about it, how much training do ACNP OR FNP get in surgery? Pretty much none. It either case, you need to be trained, i.e.: OJT.

    Quote from Annaiya
    Only in some states, in the state I live in, an FNP cannot be a surgical NP.
  14. Visit  Annaiya profile page
    0
    Im in TX, of course. And I realize that it isn't a lot of states at this point, but if the consensus model becomes more widespread throughout the states I think it is something that people considering school should be aware of. By the time they are done with their program, they may find that the laws for their state have changed. I believe that FNP programs require clinical hours in certain different areas, or at least, you need to have a good variety to pass boards. Whereas, for ACPNP, there is a lot of flexibility on where you concentrate your hours. If you do 360 hours in surgery, you'd have a pretty good understanding of the basics by the end. And for any specialty, the real learning starts on the job, regardless of how much time you spend working the in the area as an RN or how many clinical hours you did.
  15. Visit  nomadcrna profile page
    0
    I'm licensed in Texas but I refuse to work there until they are not so restrictive. For sure, one of the worst states for NP practice.
    Remember, the consensus model needs to be passed by the states and the states do not necessarily have to pass it exactly as written. In any case, there are paths to get more education so a NP may specialize as long as they stay within their "lifespan".

    FNP and ACNP have flexibility but both have requirements as well. I did many hours in the ER during my fnp rotations. Great experience, all ages and huge variety.
    Speaking of surgery, NONE of the NP programs specifically have surgery training. So how do you get the state board to recognize this practice? It is much more cut and dried for say a FNP doing intensivist work or ACNP doing primary care in regards to the consensus model.
    The easiest way for NPs in restrictive states would be to get their RNFA.
    BTW, medicare and insurances allow NPs to bill for surgery services.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top