NP residency/fellowship

  1. 0
    I am curious to see if there is any interest out there, particularly from the new grad NPs, for NP residencies, similar to ones offered for PAs.

    I'm thinking of something that is a year long in specialties like EM or surgery where the NP is paid a small stipend and treated like a resident. Long hours and low pay, yes, but excellent opportunity to build confidence and marketability.

    Mark
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  4. 3
    here are all the ones i know about:

    residency/fellowship programs for nps not all offer paid salary

    virginia commonwealth university- residency in tertiary care
    http://www.vcu.edu/ look in postmasters certificates

    md anderson cancer center- residency in oncology nursing
    http://www.mdanderson.org/prof_education/nursefellow/

    baylor college of medicine/texas children’s cancer center- oncology/hematology
    http://www.txccc.org/content.cfm?menu_id=118 is the pediatric np training program

    university of north carolina at chapel hill- orthopedics
    http://www.med.unc.edu/ortho/np/npinfo.html

    lahey clinic- dermatology
    http://www.lahey.org/medical/dermatology/dermatology_nursefellowship.asp

    american association for the study of liver disease- hepatology fellowship
    https://www.aasld.org/eweb/dynamicpage.aspx?site=aasld3&webkey=d18920e3-c01d-4177-aa82-3f6d5867c6dc

    mount sinai school medicine- palliative care
    http://www.mssm.edu/grecc/activities.shtml interprofessional palliative care fellowship

    memorial sloan-kettering cancer center- palliative care
    http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/2891.cfm

    national multiple sclerosis society- multiple sclerosis
    http://www.nationalmssociety.org john dystel fellowship

    university of arizona- integrative medicine
    http://integrativemedicine.arizona.edu/af/index.html
  5. 0
    Thank you...these all look great. What about ones in surgery or ED that are more predominantly occupied by PAs? Is there a place where I can find a listing?
  6. 1
    Quote from mark2climb
    Thank you...these all look great. What about ones in surgery or ED that are more predominantly occupied by PAs? Is there a place where I can find a listing?
    http://www.appap.org/

    There are also some programs out there that haven't joined APPAP.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    jlcole45 likes this.
  7. 0
    unfortunately there is not a centralized database of residencies/fellowships for nps... i used google to find the ones i listed. the nln and ccne do not recognize or accredit np residencies/fellowships. i wish someone would, it would open up new doors for us as a profession. even physical therapy, optometry and, pharmacy has accredited residencies and fellowships.

    pas have an advantage in this area by having approved accredited residencies. i do not think that a np could gain acceptance into a pa residency but i could be wrong.

    traditionally if a np wants further training they do a post masters certificate you pay for tuition and have a structured learning experience. there are certificates in urgent care, oncology, derm, ectů not just traditional np roles.

    i am not aware of a post masters np certificate in surgery the closest i can think of would be an rnfa program but there may be other options out there. i believe that the orthopedic residency has a surgical component.

    jeremy
  8. 2
    Thanks for doing all the leg work on Google, Jeremy. I've done the same thing. I came across University of Maryland Medical Center earlier and they do have a fellowship program for NPs. It's not a prescribed program. They let you design your own fellowship based on your interest and time available. There is no stipend and I'm not sure if there is an associated cost.

    And NPs cannot apply for PA residencies. I did check on that as well.

    I would like to see more NP residencies that are established with specific didactic and clinical content, small stipend, and solid preceptors in specialties such as surgery, EM, and critical care. I don't think these need to be necessarily procedure-based but that can be a component or focus, but more on the specific guidelines of care prescribed by the appropriate medical specialty associations.

    I know there are those out there who would disagree with a focus on medicine for NPs. Yes, I agree that nurses focus more holistically on the patient than many diagnosis focused physicians and we don't have to stop doing that. What we do need is more rigorous medical training to compliment the other aspects of nursing. I know there are many new grad NPs who would desire more indept specialty training.

    Perhaps we can all go to our favorite county hospital and propose it to their residency coordinators. They treat us like residents, pay us like residents, but also train us like residents. We would be cheap for them and they would teach us medicine.

    Thoughts?
    lananp and jlcole45 like this.
  9. 3
    Quote from mark2climb
    Thanks for doing all the leg work on Google, Jeremy. I've done the same thing. I came across University of Maryland Medical Center earlier and they do have a fellowship program for NPs. It's not a prescribed program. They let you design your own fellowship based on your interest and time available. There is no stipend and I'm not sure if there is an associated cost.

    And NPs cannot apply for PA residencies. I did check on that as well.

    I would like to see more NP residencies that are established with specific didactic and clinical content, small stipend, and solid preceptors in specialties such as surgery, EM, and critical care. I don't think these need to be necessarily procedure-based but that can be a component or focus, but more on the specific guidelines of care prescribed by the appropriate medical specialty associations.

    I know there are those out there who would disagree with a focus on medicine for NPs. Yes, I agree that nurses focus more holistically on the patient than many diagnosis focused physicians and we don't have to stop doing that. What we do need is more rigorous medical training to compliment the other aspects of nursing. I know there are many new grad NPs who would desire more indept specialty training.

    Perhaps we can all go to our favorite county hospital and propose it to their residency coordinators. They treat us like residents, pay us like residents, but also train us like residents. We would be cheap for them and they would teach us medicine.

    Thoughts?
    There is no reason to treat you like residencies. Unlike residents you have a license and can bill even in a residency/fellowship. They make plenty of money off you if they know what your are doing. The other issue is that they would have to design the didactic component. Sometimes that is done for you other times it is not. For example the AASLD fellowship does not meet minimum requirements to be listed as a PA post graduate programs. The PA side has existed as a structured entity since 1988. Going to any old community hospital invites abuse and neglect. Realistically the DNP is a structured post graduate program if you already have your NP. If you really feel the need for post grad training that is the route to go.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  10. 2
    I had forgotten about the ability to bill. Thanks, Core0. By the way, where did that term, "Cor Zero", come from? I've never heard an arrest called that before I moved. I agree that there is no need to treat anyone like residents.

    The complaint that I have with most DNP programs is the relatively small amount of clinical hours available. Most DNP curriculum spend more than half of the credits on management and research courses and only a small portion on science or clinical practice.

    What I like about residencies/fellowships is the total focus on clinical practice.
    bluecloud and PICUPNP like this.
  11. 0
    Quote from mark2climb
    I had forgotten about the ability to bill. Thanks, Core0. By the way, where did that term, "Cor Zero", come from? I've never heard an arrest called that before I moved. I agree that there is no need to treat anyone like residents.

    The complaint that I have with most DNP programs is the relatively small amount of clinical hours available. Most DNP curriculum spend more than half of the credits on management and research courses and only a small portion on science or clinical practice.

    What I like about residencies/fellowships is the total focus on clinical practice.
    I'm not sure where core0 came from. I have only heard it used on Colorado. I think that it means core functions are zero. It is used instead of code blue around here. It is also a computer term to dump core memory.

    You should look again at the DNP requirements. While the credits may not reflect this by NONPF standards they require 1000 hours of clinical experience in the area selected. They also require seperate classes in pathophysiology, pharmacology and disease process. This is double the average amount of clinical hours in most NP programs. The advantage is that per the guidelines you can essentially design these programs to meet your needs. The disadvantage that I see is that it will be difficult for outsiders to evaluate the exposure and learning of the individual student.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  12. 0
    Do you happen to know how those numbers compare to PA residencies?


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