NP education - a rant - page 2

I came to the site today and saw lot's of posts of wonderfully excited people interested in becoming NP's. The vast majority of the tones of education were: "I have the opportunity to become and NP... Read More

  1. by   CatskillNP
    Congrats on a huge accomplishment YRNS. I graduated at 19 with my LPN,a nd was pretty sure I was headed for a masters in nursing anesthesia some day. Oh well, times and ideas change.


    This wasn't a "don't become an NP" rant. It's great that yo want to become an NP, I'd be hard presses to have found another career I would have anjoyed more. This was more of a don't take the easy road, or don't let NP's give the career away for nothing rant. Hard work and experience will prove successful and good luck in your endeavors. Scott
  2. by   youngRNstudent
    Quote from CatskillNP
    Congrats on a huge accomplishment YRNS. I graduated at 19 with my LPN,a nd was pretty sure I was headed for a masters in nursing anesthesia some day. Oh well, times and ideas change.


    This wasn't a "don't become an NP" rant. It's great that yo want to become an NP, I'd be hard presses to have found another career I would have anjoyed more. This was more of a don't take the easy road, or don't let NP's give the career away for nothing rant. Hard work and experience will prove successful and good luck in your endeavors. Scott
    Catskill,
    I understand! I just dont want others who have hopes of going further with their RN license to be discouraged!
  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from youngRNstudent
    Some people know what they want, yes even before they have R.N. experience.

    I will be graduating this December with my R.N. license, and already have plans to become an NP. The program I chose is a program where I will have 2 years RN experience before entering the program, and I can continue to work during the 3 years of schooling for the NP.

    So, when I do become an NP, I will have had 5 years nursing experience. I commend students who look beyond the RN license. I don't think it is impossible to know that you want to be an NP before becoming an RN!!!! The reason I went to nursing school was to become an NP.

    Experience is something you cannot get in school, and it is extremely valuable, but please do not think someone needs 10+ years of bedside nursing to have what it takes to be an NP.
    You actually know what area that you want to specialize in, before you even work as a nurse? Glad that you are getting the two years of experience first, as many ideas will change.

    Good luck to you.................
  4. by   Cardiology EP NP
    I agree that one should have experience before becoming an NP. I don't doubt that at all. However, for myself personally, I don't feel like I need to work as an RN for 10 years before I become an NP. I have worked in medical field in various capacities over the last 14 years. I have had experience in surgical intensive care unit, medical oncology, cancer treatment center, pediatrics, acute care centers and telemetry. I have worked enough along side both physicians and nurses to know what's going on.

    When we look at the time it takes to become a physician, these people only get 3 years of very intense clinical training in residency and after that they are done. Now, I doubt they know everything there is to know but they have a wide scope of practice. Even after working as an RN for 15 years, one still won't know everything there is to know. We are always still learning as we continue to work and go to school.

    I know it's not worth much, but that's my 2 cents.
  5. by   dtwaa
    I completely agree with the problem of churning out NP's without any experience but I don't think the solution is previous nursing experience. Being a nurse and being a NP are so different, I don't see the correlation. It is like saying that to be an accountant for a trucking firm, you should have trucking experience. The NP programs should, in my opinion, have some form of residency. Popping them out without experience doing what they have a license for is trouble. RN experience is certainly a benefit, but not the solution. Just my opinion.
  6. by   youngRNstudent
    Quote from suzanne4
    You actually know what area that you want to specialize in, before you even work as a nurse? Glad that you are getting the two years of experience first, as many ideas will change.

    Good luck to you.................
    No, I do not know what I want to specialize in, but I do know I want to be a nurse practitioner. (That would be the point of the 2 years RN experience, before starting the program, and then 3 more during my program!) You don't start to specialize until your MSN, halfway through the FNP program.

    I'm sorry I think its smarter to continue with school than to stop, work for 10 years, and then try to go back. Experience is needed, as everyone has said, but I think its ridiculous to try and hold someone back from doing what they really wanted in the first place. That's my opinion
  7. by   youngRNstudent
    Quote from dtwaa
    I completely agree with the problem of churning out NP's without any experience but I don't think the solution is previous nursing experience. Being a nurse and being a NP are so different, I don't see the correlation. It is like saying that to be an accountant for a trucking firm, you should have trucking experience. The NP programs should, in my opinion, have some form of residency. Popping them out without experience doing what they have a license for is trouble. RN experience is certainly a benefit, but not the solution. Just my opinion.
    NP programs give you HOURS and HOURS of clinical experience. How is that any different than the clinical experience you got in nursing school? Tons of people have told me that no matter what you learned in nursing school, its completely different than what happens when you start to work. This may be the case for NP school too.
  8. by   youngRNstudent
    Quote from helper
    I agree that one should have experience before becoming an NP. I don't doubt that at all. However, for myself personally, I don't feel like I need to work as an RN for 10 years before I become an NP. I have worked in medical field in various capacities over the last 14 years. I have had experience in surgical intensive care unit, medical oncology, cancer treatment center, pediatrics, acute care centers and telemetry. I have worked enough along side both physicians and nurses to know what's going on.

    When we look at the time it takes to become a physician, these people only get 3 years of very intense clinical training in residency and after that they are done. Now, I doubt they know everything there is to know but they have a wide scope of practice. Even after working as an RN for 15 years, one still won't know everything there is to know. We are always still learning as we continue to work and go to school.

    I know it's not worth much, but that's my 2 cents.
    I completely agree with you. That much experience does not mean you will be a better NP than the RN with a few years experience
  9. by   suzanne4
    Quote from helper
    I agree that one should have experience before becoming an NP. I don't doubt that at all. However, for myself personally, I don't feel like I need to work as an RN for 10 years before I become an NP. I have worked in medical field in various capacities over the last 14 years. I have had experience in surgical intensive care unit, medical oncology, cancer treatment center, pediatrics, acute care centers and telemetry. I have worked enough along side both physicians and nurses to know what's going on.

    When we look at the time it takes to become a physician, these people only get 3 years of very intense clinical training in residency and after that they are done. Now, I doubt they know everything there is to know but they have a wide scope of practice. Even after working as an RN for 15 years, one still won't know everything there is to know. We are always still learning as we continue to work and go to school.

    I know it's not worth much, but that's my 2 cents.
    Yes, you stated that you have had previous experience in the healthcare field. Many of the posters here have never worked in a hospital other than some clinical hours and there is a big difference. Specialties can vary greatly.
    Good luck to you.
  10. by   suzanne4
    Quote from dtwaa
    I completely agree with the problem of churning out NP's without any experience but I don't think the solution is previous nursing experience. Being a nurse and being a NP are so different, I don't see the correlation. It is like saying that to be an accountant for a trucking firm, you should have trucking experience. The NP programs should, in my opinion, have some form of residency. Popping them out without experience doing what they have a license for is trouble. RN experience is certainly a benefit, but not the solution. Just my opinion.
    It is not experience just as an RN, but experience of working in healthcare and seeing all of the options that are available. Look at the numbers of nursing students that want to become NNPs. You do not do any type of rotation in school in an NICU, it takes a year or two of training to just feel comfortable in that area, let alone making life and death decisions on these kids.
    How many of you started working in one area of nursing, only to find that you didn't like it or enjoy it after a year or so, and then switched to a different unit and were much happier?
    Being in school and actually working and seeing what is out there are completely two different things. Look at how many posts are also from students that applied to nursing school and were accepted, yet, have no idea of what being a nurse is even like. How many nurses that were in your class are actually there 5 years later? Even finished the program? The drop-out rates from nursing school now is probably about 50%, meaning only about 50% of the students that started with you will finish with you.

    From a business standpoint, as well as management, you would be much wiser to take a year or two and work, and make sure that this is something that you really want to do before investing all of that time and money.

    And when talking about doctors, their curriculum when they are in school rotates thru every area, nursing does not.
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RN4NICU
    IMO this is how the CRNAs have set themselves apart as professionals. They require at least one year of critical care experience before entry into the program. This is a main differentiation of the CRNA from the Anesthesiologist Assistant (anesthesia's version of a PA - no health care experience required to enter). There is no "fast track" to becoming a CRNA. You must get experience, there is no way around it - and actually working in nursing has a way of "weeding out" people who are just out for $$$.

    If NP programs set similar standards, perhaps the profession would enjoy similar recognition/compensation?
    Actually, there are accelerated "fast-track" CRNA programs now. You don't have to be an RN to qualify. Just a bachelor's of science degree (not a BSN).

    Some people say it's OK and that there's no shortcuts with the requirements. But I have doubts. There seems to accelerated everything these days. It's worrisome.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 10, '04
  12. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I have a friend who had been a certified critical care RN, with a BSN, for 15 years. She went back to school for another 4 years and got her CFNP. She has been looking for an NP job for almost a year, and can't find anything.
  13. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from lizz
    Actually, there are accelerated "fast-track" CRNA programs now. You don't have to be an RN to qualify. Just a bachelor's of science degree (not a BSN).

    Some people say it's OK and that there's no shortcuts with the requirements. But I have doubts. There seems to accelerated everything these days. It's worrisome.

    I wonder how they are getting away with this. The AANA requires 1 year of critical care experience as an RN to enter an accredited CRNA program. The bachelors can be in something other than nursing (but I think it still has to be a science), but how do they get around the experience requirement - I thought that one was non-negotiable?
    You're right. If this info is correct it is VERY worrisome. I wouldn't want someone who took shortcuts pushing drugs into MY veins.

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