I should have gone to med school! (rant) - page 3

by BmoreCRNP | 10,325 Views | 25 Comments

Have you ever felt like this? I am having one of those weeks right now, lol. Sometimes I feel that I missed the mark by going the nursing route. I feel that as an NP I don't have the autonomy and respect that I really want. ... Read More


  1. 2
    As an NP it may be challenging to find a job in a state where you will be respected and are given a lot of autonomy. I know some posters have also mentioned the fact that as a new NP, sometimes there is insecurity in the level of knowledge. I guarantee you that will change with time and experience. The more you do your job, the more you will learn and you will gain people's respect, even the docs.

    I used to work in a pediatric office made up of 13 docs and 1 NP. But, boy that one NP sure knew her stuff. She had been practicing for years and she was very well respected and often times, believe it or not, she found stuff the docs didn't. For example, I remember this new doc started working with us fresh out of residency and this 7 year old girl came in to the office with a rash and a fever for 1 week. Well the new doc saw her and couldn't tell what the rash was. So she asked the NP to go in there and take a look at the rash. The NP comes of out the exam room 30 seconds later and says, "It's chicken pox." I always have to laugh at this story because someone could have all the knowledge in the world but they could be lacking so much when it comes experience, which could make all the difference. So, years later let's hope that doc who is no longer a new doc can recognize chicken pox.

    We all have to give ourselves time to adjust to the role of the NP. Docs train for years. The EP docs I work with have had 7-8 years of training post med school. With time and experience we can perfect our knowledge and skills as an NP. Patience is one the biggest virtues INMHO.
    FemmeDuJour and diamondmeadowsRN like this.
  2. 0
    Well said! I agree that we NPs just need to have patience with ourselves and really give ourselves a chance to develop our knowledge and skills. We do get much less clinical training in medicine compared to MDs so it's perfectly ok to realize it will take time to be an expert

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  3. 1
    If you've ever had the chance to work around 1st year residents, your confidence would be greatly boosted. New residents are quite frankly, clueless and a lot would ask RNs advice when taking care of a patient especially on night shift. I can't tell you how many times I heard "what do the other docs usually do for this" or the flipping pages of some book when calling for an order from a new resident. The great thing about working at a teaching hospital is you got to see these residents progress from the bumbling stage to that of a competent MD as they went along in their residency for those 4 to 5 years. A lot of my classmates have stated several times that a residency for NPs would be a great idea especially that first year out of school. Of course this is not something that is widely offered, but hold fast in the fact that even new MDs need years of experience before becoming confident as well as gaining the respect of the staff. I can't tell you how many eye rolls I've seen or done myself when dealing with a first year resident.
    SycamoreGuy likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from Cardiology EP NP
    As an NP it may be challenging to find a job in a state where you will be respected and are given a lot of autonomy. I know some posters have also mentioned the fact that as a new NP, sometimes there is insecurity in the level of knowledge. I guarantee you that will change with time and experience. The more you do your job, the more you will learn and you will gain people's respect, even the docs. I used to work in a pediatric office made up of 13 docs and 1 NP. But, boy that one NP sure knew her stuff. She had been practicing for years and she was very well respected and often times, believe it or not, she found stuff the docs didn't. For example, I remember this new doc started working with us fresh out of residency and this 7 year old girl came in to the office with a rash and a fever for 1 week. Well the new doc saw her and couldn't tell what the rash was. So she asked the NP to go in there and take a look at the rash. The NP comes of out the exam room 30 seconds later and says, "It's chicken pox." I always have to laugh at this story because someone could have all the knowledge in the world but they could be lacking so much when it comes experience, which could make all the difference. So, years later let's hope that doc who is no longer a new doc can recognize chicken pox. We all have to give ourselves time to adjust to the role of the NP. Docs train for years. The EP docs I work with have had 7-8 years of training post med school. With time and experience we can perfect our knowledge and skills as an NP. Patience is one the biggest virtues INMHO.
    I catch stuff that MD miss frequently, especially when I was in prison (working BTW), but also in the heart hospital I work in now. It is possibly due to EMR check box mentality. Take a breath give yourself a break. I'm working in a heart hospital and playing catchup like mad. I'm learning a metric ton and even though some might think what I do is scut monkey work (residents) but I like it. I feel like I'm in nomansland as well. The nurses kept introducing me as the new PA. Not that this burns me or in any way diminishes me, but I am one of them, sort of. No biggie.
    NPAlby likes this.
  5. 0
    I guess it depends on where you work and the culture there. I work in AZ and I feel NPs are valued. Now nursing in general in AZ sounds a lil effy but as an NP I have a lot of autonomy.
  6. 0
    I wouldn't want to give or take zofran IM, zofran barely works unless it's prophylaxis IMHO; and you can give it IV or subL so why go with IM? OUch!


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