need lots of mgt advice----wanna online mentor?? - page 2

hi all :wave: this is a copy of my post from the gen discussion board...maybe i'll have good luck here :confused: this is a copy of my posts: Hi, I'm charis and new to this board.... Read More

  1. by   RNPATL
    I think any new manager needs to establish themselves as an individual that is fair, honest and consistent. Most nurse managers have little experience in management and can really mess up. Many nurses have been subjected to this poor leadership and over time they develop a leadership or manager phobia .... the common thing I hear is .... "we don't need to change a thing ... he or she will be gone (like the rest of them were) in a matter of months and then we can go back to doing what we were doing." As a new manager, being able to establish repor and decent communication with the staff is probably the single most important thing to do.

    I was asked recently by one of my nurses (I just re-entered nursing management and am running a great MS unit) ...."how do you know where to start with so many issues that need to be addressed?" My response to her was, "I listen to the nurses." Really, that is all it is. Listen, observe and inquire ..... those simple tips and tools are what you need to be successful. Another thing that I have found helpful is asking the nurses on a daily basis if they have the tools and equipment they need to do the job. It is amazing how nurses survive out there with little tools and equipment. Something as simple as taking vital signs can take a lot of time if the equipment is not working. Nothing is more frustrating to a nurse than not having functional equipment.

    As a manager, I not only see myself as a patient advocate, but I see my role as one that makes the lives of the nurses a little better. For me, if the nurses are happy (within reason) ... then, it is my hope and belief that patient's benefit from better care.

    Just my 2 cents for what it is worth.
  2. by   steff_rn1
    I totally agree with the last reply. I think the most important part of being a nurse manager is to listen to your employees, ask their opinions, and pitch in when times are tough. I have gained respect (and cooperation) from my employees by asking their opinions when their is a problem and considering their input in my decisions. My staff also knows that if there is a crisis (even short of staff), I will pitch in and help. This makes them feel that we are all a team and work together. Of course, I still have the "problem children". I just try to make myself available to the staff, talk to them when they have concerns, and address the problems at hand. I feel this has helped me to develop a very good rapport and working relationship with the staff. I have been told many times that the managers before me would "never help someone to the bathroom" or never help the nurse on the floor with orders. I think, that as managers, you should remember where you came from and not think of yourself as on a higher level than the staff under you. Good luck with your position. It takes a very special, people oriented person to be a manager.
    Quote from RNPATL
    I think any new manager needs to establish themselves as an individual that is fair, honest and consistent. Most nurse managers have little experience in management and can really mess up. Many nurses have been subjected to this poor leadership and over time they develop a leadership or manager phobia .... the common thing I hear is .... "we don't need to change a thing ... he or she will be gone (like the rest of them were) in a matter of months and then we can go back to doing what we were doing." As a new manager, being able to establish repor and decent communication with the staff is probably the single most important thing to do.

    I was asked recently by one of my nurses (I just re-entered nursing management and am running a great MS unit) ...."how do you know where to start with so many issues that need to be addressed?" My response to her was, "I listen to the nurses." Really, that is all it is. Listen, observe and inquire ..... those simple tips and tools are what you need to be successful. Another thing that I have found helpful is asking the nurses on a daily basis if they have the tools and equipment they need to do the job. It is amazing how nurses survive out there with little tools and equipment. Something as simple as taking vital signs can take a lot of time if the equipment is not working. Nothing is more frustrating to a nurse than not having functional equipment.

    As a manager, I not only see myself as a patient advocate, but I see my role as one that makes the lives of the nurses a little better. For me, if the nurses are happy (within reason) ... then, it is my hope and belief that patient's benefit from better care.

    Just my 2 cents for what it is worth.

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