ADN vs BSN Managers - page 2

by CrispyRN 1,746 Views | 17 Comments

Don't get me wrong. I'm an ADN. However, our nurse manager is an ADN in a BSN program. What I was curious about is what difference you think an ADN vs BSN has when in management. Our manager seems to have multiple faults... Read More


  1. 0
    Well, if she has, it sounds like they didn't "take".
  2. 0
    Crispy, just don't let her fry your already charred butt anymore.

    Rise above.

    And fuhgedaboudid.
  3. 1
    Seems like the problem ultimately is with management above her who hired her for the job. They should have known about her character/behavior before promoting her, yet they promoted her anyway ... tolerating that kind of idiocy doesn't make them look good. Wait until half the RNs quit because of her. Maybe the entire management at the hospital is of really poor quality. FWIW, if an ADN is promoted into management, I'd think it would be a condition of the job for her to finish a BSN and get a graduate degree. (As well as stopping her junior high schoolgirl behavior.) Managers need to be wise enough to not act from or be manipulated by the cliques and gossip on the floor but be completely above all that to see the bigger picture and deal fairly with everyone.
    CrispyRN likes this.
  4. 1
    I went to a BSN program, and the management/leadership class was a joke. Overall program was good. This was an entry to practice program, so the school was more interested in clinical/safety area of the curriculum, rather than educating future managers.

    I am so sorry that you are having problems with your floor manager. I can relate to that. I have to say that I hope that it does not change your attitude/ability to provide great care to your patients. Hold tight, and remember the saying, "this too, shall pass"

    Wayunderpaid
    SuesquatchRN likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from wayunderpaid
    I went to a BSN program, and the management/leadership class was a joke. Overall program was good. This was an entry to practice program, so the school was more interested in clinical/safety area of the curriculum, rather than educating future managers.

    I am so sorry that you are having problems with your floor manager. I can relate to that. I have to say that I hope that it does not change your attitude/ability to provide great care to your patients. Hold tight, and remember the saying, "this too, shall pass"

    Wayunderpaid
    You bring up a good point here. Some people mistakenly believe that BSN programs include management education that prepares people for positions in administration. That's not true in most cases. The "leadership" courses in a generic BSN program tend to be more focused on the Charge Nurse role and general principles of delegation than on actual administration skills. Any content on actual administration is usually very introductory.

    Why a BSN is often required for positions in management is often because it is believed that the general education and introducion to some basic management priniciples provides a stronger founder for the learning of management skills later. People are not expected to graduate from their entry level programs (e.g. BSN) fully educated for leadership roles. The BSN provides just a basic introduction that needs to be built upon.

    BSN completion programs tend to include a little more becasue they expect their students to be already competent as staff nurses, charge nurses, etc. and ready to learn more advanced content.
  6. 0
    frankly, i dont care what nursing credentials you have , i think a BS in management should be req
  7. 0
    All the education in the world does not make a good leader. It may teach you how to fill out papers. It may offer ideas on how to motivate people. But unless you have the heart of a servant, you will not be a good leader. A good leader puts others before themselves. They can see all points of view and make good decisions, even when those decisions go against their own personal biases. A good leader puts aside their ideas of climbing the ladder and instead focuses on helping their "followers" achieve success in their work. A good leader knows where to go when they need help. They recognize when they do need help and are not to proud to ask for it. A good leader stands for what is right without regard for personal cost.

    I could go on and on but the gist is - education and classes are nothing compared to the type of character is required to be a an effective, fair, pleasant manager. You have to be a leader in your heart and you can learn to get your mind on the right track. Too many people think that classes are what teach managers to be good. Much to the detriment of nursing.
  8. 0
    I agree with the others. One can be an excellent nurse manager with an ADN. However, I personally believe all nurse managers should have a BSN.

    I believe the nuse manager position is an advanced one....therefore, requiring an advanced or higher education level.


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