North Carolina Central University

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    are you or do you know anyone that graduated from nccu's bsn program? was it a positive experience? how equipped were you for your first job?
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    Quote from lilwill27330
    are you or do you know anyone that graduated from nccu's bsn program? was it a positive experience? how equipped were you for your first job?
    I know of two people who went through the nursing program there. One dropped, and the other went, but it took her awhile. Can't exactly remember the details....some of the classes she needed was only offered once a year?? So at one point she had to sit out, and wait until the next year to get the course. It took her a while to get through it, but she eventually made it. I am assuming its equally as hard as ALL the nursing programs. Are you at NCCU?
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    Quote from LBHOTGIRL99
    I know of two people who went through the nursing program there. One dropped, and the other went, but it took her awhile. Can't exactly remember the details....some of the classes she needed was only offered once a year?? So at one point she had to sit out, and wait until the next year to get the course. It took her a while to get through it, but she eventually made it. I am assuming its equally as hard as ALL the nursing programs. Are you at NCCU?


    yeah, im trying to figure out rather i should come home to the local community college. im finishing up my prereqs this year at central. im worried because ive heard so many negative things about the program. i've heard extremely positive things, but the negatives are down right scarey. if i went to the community college i would have less debt, and less classes. i have almost all of my prereqs completed for the comm collegel, minus my a&p's which i would have to take over at the community college, because of credit issues. at the community college i have 24 hr day care arranged, im closer to my family. the bad part is im stuck in a lil town (not saying durham is metropolitan). im just trying to way my options. ive been weighing them for almost 6 months now, my crazy, non decision making butt needs to make up my mind. ..........................heeeeeeeelpppppppppppppp ppppp
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    These statistics may be of benefit to you:
    http://www.ncbon.com/LicStat-CATRNWEB.asp
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    Quote from VickyRN
    These statistics may be of benefit to you:
    http://www.ncbon.com/LicStat-CATRNWEB.asp

    i dont understand why central's testing numbers are so low. they permit approx 45 students in a year. why are only 11 ppl taking boards? im so frustrated with them i could scream......the community college i was going to attend has a 100 average. what would you do? get your adn in a city with lower cost of living, or take the exact amount of time, work like a dog and go to school to finish with my bsn and approximately $25,000 in debt?
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    Quote from lilwill27330
    i dont understand why central's testing numbers are so low. they permit approx 45 students in a year. why are only 11 ppl taking boards? im so frustrated with them i could scream......the community college i was going to attend has a 100 average. what would you do? get your adn in a city with lower cost of living, or take the exact amount of time, work like a dog and go to school to finish with my bsn and approximately $25,000 in debt?
    I would NOT let the debt scare me. You just have to figure out which is more important to you. If you know that you want to advance in nursing, maybe work as a practitioner, then I would go for the BSN because advance practice nursing will require graduate school. Think of it this way--it's going to take you the same amount of time to obtain both degrees, so why not go for the higher one?? Still you could choose to go the ADN route, and then do the RN-BSN thing. I think once you are an RN, its not as competitive to get in for your BSN. So those are my thoughts. Also just appy to both! It seems to be difficult to get in anywhere. Apply to both schools, and see what happens. Then you will at least have a back up plan in-case one falls through. Good luck with whatever you decide.
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    Hi,

    I attended NCCU from 2003 until this spring with hopes of earning my BSN. I recently transferred to JCC in Smithfield to go through their ADN program instead.
    NCCU's nursing department does have quite a lot of issues and I personally made the decision that I would rather go to a school with a 100% NCLEX passing rate rather than stay at a school with a 80% passing rate (during a good year) and put up with all of the nonsense.
    Although, I recently heard that Central's nursing dept has a new dean so hopefully she will come in and make the necessary changes the program needs.

    Like someone else suggested, if you are interested in pursuing an advanced degree you might want to consider staying and praying that you are accepted into the upper division (as I'm sure you've heard they try hard to deny applicants since space is so limited). Or, if you feel you'd be content right now with an ADN performing in a clinical setting, I would seriously think about attending your local community college and maybe enrolling in a RN-BSN program later.

    I researched ECU and a few other schools' RN-BSN programs and based on the pre-req's I took at NCCU, I would be able to earn a BSN in less than one year. While I will be getting my BSN a year later than the other students I started at Central with, at least I know that when I sit for the boards, I will be well prepared to pass.


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